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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

Initial exploration of the experiences of same sex domestic violence among lesbians from "ethno-racial" communities

Vázquez-Roldán, Marjorie January 2001 (has links)
Despite increasing interest on the topic of violence in intimate relationships, research exploring the experiences of same sex domestic violence among lesbians from "ethno-racial" communities remains considerably rare. In this qualitative study, semi structured interviews were conducted with four (4) lesbians (one experiencer, one aggressor and two community workers) and one heterosexual shelter worker. The aim was to explore the intersections of gender, "race"/ethnic group, and sexual orientation and their impact upon the experience of violence. The accounts of the participants demonstrated that converging identities and experiences of oppression, such as homophobia, heterosexism, sexism and racism, affect the nature of same sex domestic violence and negatively impact upon the conceptualization of the experience of violence. The attitudes of social workers and other professionals are also identified as being a significant barrier to the help seeking strategies of both experiencers and aggressors.
12

White racial identity and social work practice

Ferguson, Debbie Elizabeth January 2003 (has links)
A most deafening silence is the effect created by the omission of Whiteness from racial discourses. Those within the social work profession, who seek to eradicate racism have for the most part, restricted their analyses to dissecting and defining the racial "Other". This has perhaps unwittingly implied an acceptance of "Whiteness" as an all-powerful, unnamed normality, exempted from the requirement of definition. This examination of White racial identity is an attempt to engage in a discussion of a different sort---exploring racism at its source. Those actively involved in the practice and/or study of Social Work in Montreal (Quebec) were asked to contemplate the meaning of "Whiteness" in society and in their own lives. Their interpretations were aligned with social and cultural interpretations, as well as my own interpretations. This study illustrates that, in spite of its elusive nature, Whiteness does indeed have very powerful meanings for those who have access to this racial category, those excluded, and the society in which we live.
13

Exploring the relationship between adolescent sex abusers and attachment : a literature review

Pashak, Darlene January 2002 (has links)
This study examined the relationship between attachment and adolescent sex abusers through a literature review. Due to the dearth of literature on this subject, separate literature reviews were conducted on attachment theory and on predisposing factors to adolescent sex abusing. The results indicated that a causal relationship between attachment and the development of adolescent sex abusers is unlikely; however, insecure attachment styles were found to be one of many factors related to adolescent sex abusing. Theories related to emotional stress, the developmental stage of adolescence, intergenerational transmission and sibling incest were generated within the theoretical context of attachment. A typology was constructed that suggests how different attachment styles may be associated with various types of adolescent sex abusers. Implications for primary prevention, treatment interventions and research were discussed.
14

Street outreach programs for homeless and underhoused people : a grounded theory study

Tanner, Alan Gordon January 2003 (has links)
As extreme poverty and homelessness continue to increase and become more visible in urban centres throughout Canada, it is increasingly more important to develop and critique interventions within the field. This grounded theory study provides and overview of one type of intervention---street outreach programs. It is informed by interviews with front line street outreach workers in Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal. It includes an outline of the academic literature on homelessness and street outreach programs and stresses the importance of viewing this social phenomenon through a structural lens. It describes in detail the main aspects of street outreach work, as well as evaluates the greater the political significance of this type of work. Conclusions demonstrate the importance of establishing trusting relationships with clients and working from a structural approach that satisfy peoples immediate needs while addressing the root causes of extreme poverty and oppression.
15

Representations of family : the effect of the National Alliance of [i.e. for] the Mentally Ill-Provider Education Program on assertive community treatment provider representations of family

Kent, Tracey January 2003 (has links)
There is growing evidence of the important role that family members play in the support and recovery of individuals diagnosed with a serious mental illness. The National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) Provider Education Program (PEP) trains providers of mental health services to work collaboratively with families in the treatment of individuals with a mental illness. This study examines the effect of the NAMI-PEP on Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) provider representations of and services provided to families at Frontenac Community Mental Health Services. Qualitative and quantitative methods of research are combined to explore ACT provider beliefs about, feelings toward and services provided to families before and after participating the NAMI-PEP. Findings suggest that the NAMI-PEP is effective in initiating changes in provider representations of family at a cognitive level. Changes in provider views are detected indicating movement toward a strengths-based orientation and an improved understanding of the components of collaborative practice with families. Analysis of changes to ACT practice patterns illuminates the challenges of implementing cultural change at an organizational level and identifies a fertile area for further research.
16

The nature and degree of stress experienced by child protection social workers /

Robson, Clint Hyatt January 2003 (has links)
This quantitative study was conducted using a population of Child Protection Social Workers (CPSWs) and other staff at a relatively small Child Welfare agency in Eastern Ontario (Northumberland County). The participants (n = 29) completed four questionnaires aimed at gathering data regarding demographics, Ongoing Stressors, Critical Incidents, and Horowitz's Impact of Events Scale (IES). The goal of the research was to add to the scant empirical data regarding stress and post-traumatic stress in CPSWs and Child Welfare organizations as a whole. The results indicated that 9 out of 11 front-line CPSWs were considered to be experiencing post-traumatic stress disorder based on their IES scores at the time of the testing. The study includes descriptive and correlational data for the participants.
17

The bullying spectrum in grade schools : parents, teachers, child bullies and their victims

Zaklama, Christine January 2003 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions and practices of children, their parents, and their teachers with regards to bullying at the grade school level. Eight children were interviewed; three that were identified by their teachers as victims, two identified as bullies and three identified as regular peers. Three parents, each taken from the victim, bully, peer groups were also interviewed, as was four teachers taken from the fifth and sixth grade, within the English and French language stream program. The subjects were interviewed using a semi-structured qualitative interview format. / Victim children were generally perceived negatively by the bullies, their peers and by some teachers. The school used in this study did not adopt a formal bullying program and teachers received no bullying training. Parents of victims and bullies were seen to have had similar childhood experiences. Victims felt they did not receive enough support by their teachers. / The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions and practices of children, their parents, and their teachers with regards to bullying at the grade school level. Eight children were interviewed; three that were identified by their teachers as victims, two identified as bullies and three identified as regular peers. Three parents, each taken from the victim, bully, peer groups were also interviewed, as was four teachers taken from the fifth and sixth grade, within the English and French language stream program. The subjects were interviewed using a semi-structured qualitative interview format. Victim children were generally perceived negatively by the bullies, their peers and by some teachers. The school used in this study did not adopt a formal bullying program and teachers received no bullying training. Parents of victims and bullies were seen to have had similar childhood experiences. Victims felt they did not receive enough support by their teachers.
18

Critical analysis of the resurgence of attachment theory

Piano, Linda Maria January 2004 (has links)
Over the past few years, attachment theory has taken on increased significance in academic and professional discourse, particularly in the field of child welfare. While this appears to be a relatively new area of interest in social work, the history of attachment theory dates back over five decades. This thesis aims to identify some of the reasons behind the resurgence of attachment theory, in particular, in child welfare practice. This renewed interest in attachment theory is tied to the current social climate and context for social work practice. This context, it is argued, contributes to the tendency for attachment theory to become a tool of social control. The thesis concludes by exploring how attachment theory might be used instead as a means to empower families in relationship-based social work.
19

Gender and child protection work : voices from the front-lines

Morgan, Katherine L. January 2004 (has links)
Child protection work largely relies on mothers in fulfilling its aim to protect children and support families. Mothers are expected to shield children from abuse and neglect regardless of circumstance. Fathers evade such expectations, and are rather treated as unimportant or as aggressors. In either case, they are distanced from the child protection process. These divergent expectations of mothers and fathers often go unnoticed in child protection practice, as social workers are consumed with the urgent need of assessing risk to children. Workers' reliance on mothers becomes a habit that is not easily countered because there is neither the time nor the tools to engage in such a battle. The present study seeks to illuminate gender constructions and their reproduction in front-line child protection work through the voices of social workers. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight former and current front-line workers for this study.
20

Smoke and mirrors : reflections of policy and practice for those with a mental illness and who are in conflict with the law

Thibault, Kathleen January 2005 (has links)
This study examined the use of language in the development and implementation of mental health policy. It focused on the current discourse of mental health reform in Ontario as it related to individuals with a mental illness and who are in conflict with the law. Using a qualitative design, informed by critical inquiry and a postmodern perspective, the researcher explored administrative perceptions of the accomplishments and challenges faced at different levels of the mental health and criminal justices systems in Ontario. The participants' understandings of the provincial mental health reform policy, Making it Happen, and the extent they felt that their organizations and related policies were able to create positive change in the lives of service users were also examined. While the language of mental health policy encompasses an empowerment, community integration approach to providing services, findings indicated that a biomedical-model, public safety discourse appear to inform both policy and practice. A number of questions and apparent inconsistencies in the manner in which the mental health and criminal justice systems deal with the needs of this population were also identified. This thesis concludes with recommendations for future research.

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