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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The Chronicler's Genealogies:Towards an Understanding of 1 Chronicles 1-9

Sparks, James Thomas 2007 (has links)
The genealogies of 1 Chronicles 1-9 have typically been viewed as the work of a redactor or redactors with no internal consistency, purpose or plan, and little, if any, relation to the narrative portions of Chronicles. In contrast to these opinions, this study shows that the genealogical section of the Chronicler's work is an ordered, well structured, unified whole. The Chronicler presents his genealogies chiastically, with the central focus of the chiasm upon the proper cultic officials, performing the proper cultic duties, in the proper cultic place. Each of the supporting levels of the chiasm build to this climax by declaring the inability of kings and armies to maintain the people within their land. The genealogies indicate that, in spite of the best efforts of leaders or people, society is sent into exile because of the unfaithfulness of the people and their leaders. The genealogies also declare the way out of exile. Humility and prayer are shown to bring blessing, prosperity and land, while periods of mourning over unfaithful behaviour results in the blessings of children and the building of cities. In the centre of it all is the cult. The cult is the means by which atonement is made for past acts of unfaithfulness, and without the cult, atonement for unfaithfulness is impossible. The genealogies indicate that the cult must be at the centre of the lives of the people. It cannot be neglected, but must be fully maintained and supported. Each of the cultic guilds must be present for the cult to function properly. Each guild must perform its function, and must do so in the place authorised by Yahweh. Only then can atonement for the people be made, and only then can the people possess their land.
2

The Chronicler's Genealogies:Towards an Understanding of 1 Chronicles 1-9

J.Sparks@murdoch.edu.au, James Thomas Sparks 2007 (has links)
The genealogies of 1 Chronicles 1-9 have typically been viewed as the work of a redactor or redactors with no internal consistency, purpose or plan, and little, if any, relation to the narrative portions of Chronicles. In contrast to these opinions, this study shows that the genealogical section of the Chronicler's work is an ordered, well structured, unified whole. The Chronicler presents his genealogies chiastically, with the central focus of the chiasm upon the proper cultic officials, performing the proper cultic duties, in the proper cultic place. Each of the supporting levels of the chiasm build to this climax by declaring the inability of kings and armies to maintain the people within their land. The genealogies indicate that, in spite of the best efforts of leaders or people, society is sent into exile because of the unfaithfulness of the people and their leaders. The genealogies also declare the way out of exile. Humility and prayer are shown to bring blessing, prosperity and land, while periods of mourning over unfaithful behaviour results in the blessings of children and the building of cities. In the centre of it all is the cult. The cult is the means by which atonement is made for past acts of unfaithfulness, and without the cult, atonement for unfaithfulness is impossible. The genealogies indicate that the cult must be at the centre of the lives of the people. It cannot be neglected, but must be fully maintained and supported. Each of the cultic guilds must be present for the cult to function properly. Each guild must perform its function, and must do so in the place authorised by Yahweh. Only then can atonement for the people be made, and only then can the people possess their land.
3

Een genealogie van twee moderniteiten Jean Bodin, Michel de Montaigne en het verval van een teleologisch wereldbeeld

Valkhoff., Rudolf Johan Unknown Date (has links)
Proefschrift Universiteit van Amsterdam. Met een samenvatting in het Engels.
4

Die Cruywagens van Suid-Afrika : 'n genealogiese en kultuurhistoriese ondersoek, 1690-1806 / Willem Adriaan Cruywagen

Cruywagen, Willem Adriaan 2004 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D. (History))--North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2004.
5

Die ontwikkeling van 'n elektroniese genealogiese databasis van burgerlike sterftes tydens die Anglo-Boereoorlog 1899-1902 / deur Elizabeth Connie Celesté Reynolds (néé Aucamp)

Reynolds, Elizabeth Connie Celesté 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.A. (History))--North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2007.
6

Die Cruywagens van Suid-Afrika : 'n genealogiese en kultuurhistoriese ondersoek, 1690-1806 / Willem Adriaan Cruywagen

9 November 2009 (has links)
Thesis / Dissertation ETD
7

Die ontwikkeling van 'n elektroniese genealogiese databasis van burgerlike sterftes tydens die Anglo-Boereoorlog 1899-1902 / deur Elizabeth Connie Celesté Reynolds (néé Aucamp)

17 November 2009 (has links)
Thesis / Dissertation ETD
8

Die Cruywagens van Suid-Afrika : 'n genealogiese en kultuurhistoriese ondersoek, 1690-1806 / Willem Adriaan Cruywagen

Cruywagen, Willem Adriaan 2004 (has links)
The research covers the time of Dutch East India Company rule at the Cape from 1690 to 1806, and focuses on a branch of an early Cape family, the Cruywagens, of which the writer is a lineal descendant. The Cmywagen ancestor, Jan, a miller, his second wife, and a son, Meendert; born from his first marriage arrived at the Cape in 1690 during the governorship of Simon van der Stel. He soon became a free burgher and, like most other Capetonians, provided board and lodging to the crews and passengers of passing fleets. The good profits reaped from the lucrative boarding business enabled Jan and his son to acquire town properties and extensive agricultural land. Meendert's son, Johannes who inherited most of the farmland, was for eighteen years, from 1724 to 1742, the holder of part of the "pag" or licence to provide the Company with meat for its ships, the hospital and the town. His cattle farms which stretched from St. Helena Bay in the north to the mouth of the Gourits River near Mossel Bay in 1739 covered nearly 39 000 morgen. By 1739 he was considered to be one of the most affluent burghers of the time. He had many dealings with the government and senior Company officials and exerted a meaningful influence on the affairs of the Cape. The same accounts for his two sons Jan (IV) and Gerhardus Hendrik, notable gentlemen who were prominent in the Patriot movement of 1779. The research ends with the second British occupation of the Cape in 1806. Attention was not only given to notable individuals but also to the general living conditions, customs, traditions, beliefs and dispositions of the ordinary citizens and countrymen. Interesting evidence on certain historical periods was collected by studying the lives and activities of the quiet, sometimes unnoticed individuals -their life stories impart meaning to the events which they experienced. The research underlined the basic truth advanced by L.G. Pine in his The Genealogist's Encyclopedia, namely The genealogy of every country is determined by the course of history; conversely, the history of a country is elucidated by its genealogy.' By integrating genealogy with cultural history and other historical disciplines a new methodology is advanced in the belief that it may prove advantageous to future researchers. Thesis (Ph.D. (History))--North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2004.
9

Die ontwikkeling van 'n elektroniese genealogiese databasis van burgerlike sterftes tydens die Anglo-Boereoorlog 1899-1902 / deur Elizabeth Connie Celesté Reynolds (néé Aucamp)

Reynolds, Elizabeth Connie Celesté 2007 (has links)
Much has been written on the Anglo-Boer War 1899-1902. Different themes, ranging from battles to more personal experiences, have been documented. Furthermore there are many statistics regarding the war. The aim of this study is to obtain, through the existing sources, the total number of civilian deaths during the Anglo- Boer war. To compile a genealogical database regarding the civilian deaths is not an easy task. Almost all sources have conflicting figures regarding the number of civilians who actually died. Deaths were not restricted to the concentration camps. There were also those of people on their way to the camps, or those fleeing from captivity. The aim of this study is to give an account of the process used to compile the genealogical database. By putting certain criteria in place the database should be stripped of any duplication. The reasons for [him concentration camps being created, and the number of camps that came into existence, including the total of deaths with unique abstracts from the database, are described in detail. There is confusion about the terms "refugee" and concentration camps. This is clarified. A brief explanation is given of how, where and when the camps came into being. The number of camps, and their period of existence, as well as the total numbers of civilian deaths in the camps, were compiled in an effort to secure greater accuracy. With the relevant support of information from the electronic database, it was possible to compile a comprehensive picture of the numbers of deaths that occurred. There are furthermore, some observations on the spelling of surnames. It is important because the use of Afrikaans, Dutch and English has led to different forms of spelling. The core objective of this study was to find the exact number of civilian deaths during the Anglo-Boer War. The penultimate chapter is a detailed explanation of related deaths. A list containing the main causes of deaths, mainly disease, is included. The number of deaths is tabulated in terms of their causes. It is possible to see the profound impact of what really happened. Information of unique deaths, deaths in certain families, as well as statistics regarding the overall age and gender of victims is included. Another aim of the study was to compile a complete list of all the civilians who died during the Anglo Boer War, more complete and with more detail than that of P.L.A. Goldman. This was indeed an overwhelming exercise. P.L.A. Goldman had a total of 27 927 names and the database total account for 33 978 individual deaths. Included are the 759 names of black names as compiled by S.V. Kessler. Hopefully the database will succeed in bringing us closer to the civilian deaths during 1899-1902. It should be useful to genealogical researchers. Thesis (M.A. (History))--North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2007.
10

Die Cruywagens van Suid-Afrika : 'n genealogiese en kultuurhistoriese ondersoek, 1690-1806 / Willem Adriaan Cruywagen

Cruywagen, Willem Adriaan 2004 (has links)
The research covers the time of Dutch East India Company rule at the Cape from 1690 to 1806, and focuses on a branch of an early Cape family, the Cruywagens, of which the writer is a lineal descendant. The Cmywagen ancestor, Jan, a miller, his second wife, and a son, Meendert; born from his first marriage arrived at the Cape in 1690 during the governorship of Simon van der Stel. He soon became a free burgher and, like most other Capetonians, provided board and lodging to the crews and passengers of passing fleets. The good profits reaped from the lucrative boarding business enabled Jan and his son to acquire town properties and extensive agricultural land. Meendert's son, Johannes who inherited most of the farmland, was for eighteen years, from 1724 to 1742, the holder of part of the "pag" or licence to provide the Company with meat for its ships, the hospital and the town. His cattle farms which stretched from St. Helena Bay in the north to the mouth of the Gourits River near Mossel Bay in 1739 covered nearly 39 000 morgen. By 1739 he was considered to be one of the most affluent burghers of the time. He had many dealings with the government and senior Company officials and exerted a meaningful influence on the affairs of the Cape. The same accounts for his two sons Jan (IV) and Gerhardus Hendrik, notable gentlemen who were prominent in the Patriot movement of 1779. The research ends with the second British occupation of the Cape in 1806. Attention was not only given to notable individuals but also to the general living conditions, customs, traditions, beliefs and dispositions of the ordinary citizens and countrymen. Interesting evidence on certain historical periods was collected by studying the lives and activities of the quiet, sometimes unnoticed individuals -their life stories impart meaning to the events which they experienced. The research underlined the basic truth advanced by L.G. Pine in his The Genealogist's Encyclopedia, namely The genealogy of every country is determined by the course of history; conversely, the history of a country is elucidated by its genealogy.' By integrating genealogy with cultural history and other historical disciplines a new methodology is advanced in the belief that it may prove advantageous to future researchers. Thesis (Ph.D. (History))--North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2004.

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