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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A comparison of the accomplishments in art education as reported for the years 1948-1951 between a group of Florida counties employing special art supervisors and a group employing general supervisors

Unknown Date (has links)
The problem as considered for this paper is to compare and study the accomplishment, expansion, and enrichment in art education between the years 1948 and 1951 in four counties employing special art supervisors with the accomplishment in art education for the same period in four counties employing only general supervisors concerned with the total curriculum. / Typescript. / "August, 1952." / "Submitted to the Graduate Council of Florida State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science." / Advisor: Julia Schwartz, Professor Directing Paper. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 52-53).
2

FORMAT AND LEXICON FOR DISCUSSION OF VERNACULAR ARTS.

White, Margaret deRosset. January 1984 (has links)
No description available.
3

Art Education as a Means of Promoting Democracy: Preparing Pre-Service Art Teachers for Social Justice Education

Unknown Date (has links)
The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the use of art as a pedagogical tool with pre-service art teachers in a graduate-level art education class. A curriculum was developed focusing on educational social justice theories and their application in regard to gender inequity and diversity issues. The goal was to lead students to engage in more self-directed learning and to become more pro-active in their society. The results indicate the value of using art making to help students explore, investigate, and examine self and self in relation to society. In addition, they shed light on transformational moments in the art making process when students’ awareness of self and social justice issues was heightened and democratic ideas were reinforced. The results have implications for classroom practice as well as enhancing the quality of art education by incorporating social justice concerns in art education for individual and community developments. / A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Art Education in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. / Summer Semester 2017. / July 7, 2017. / Educational Democracy, Practitioner research, Pre-service art teacher, Social justice Art, Social justice education, Students-centered curriculum / Includes bibliographical references. / Sara Shields, Professor Directing Dissertation; Tamara Bertrand Jones, University Representative; Ayesha Khurshid, Committee Member; Jeff Broome, Committee Member; Ann Rowson, Committee Member.
4

The Museum as a Space for Therapeutic Art Experiences for Adolescents with High Functioning Autism (HFA)

Unknown Date (has links)
Museum education and art therapy collaborations have emerged to work together to achieve simultaneous education and therapeutic goals for adolescent populations (Peacock, 2012). There is a need for research in the area of improving the services and quality of lives of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). This study explored the responses of adolescents with high functioning autism (HFA) as they engaged in therapeutic art experiences in the museum setting. Four adolescents ages 13-17 participated in two hour-long sessions twice weekly over the course of ten weeks. They created thematic exhibitions with artist statements that were displayed in a university-based art museum in an exhibition titled My Own Expression. A thematic analysis identified four themes that emerged to describe the therapeutic benefits of utilizing the museum as a space for art therapy sessions with this population. Participant responses indicated four areas of development that occurred across the cases: cognitive and language development, adolescent identity development, socioemotional development, and sensory and affect regulation development. Keywords: art therapy, art museum education, high functioning autism (HFA), joint attention, cognitive and language development, socioemotional development, sensory regulation / A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Art Education in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. / Spring Semester 2018. / April 2, 2018. / Art museum education, Art therapy, High functioning Autism (HFA), joint attention, sensory regulation, socioemotional development / Includes bibliographical references. / David E. Gussak, Professor Directing Dissertation; Holly Hanessian, University Representative; Pat Villeneuve, Committee Member; Barbara Parker-Bell, Committee Member; Ann Rowson-Love, Committee Member.
5

Facilitating the Interactive Mural Experience as an Act of Creative Placemaking

Unknown Date (has links)
Community mural projects exist in a medium of high visual payoff, illustrating desired subject matter meant to serve a specific audience. While the result is indeed an important element, it is not the only point of emphasis. This dissertation focused on the community mural experience from the planning and installation phases, completed by youth volunteers at a teen center. Designed and executed through the lens of creative placemaking, this dissertation research relies on visual and narrative data. The findings highlight the importance of an inclusive interactive culture during community mural dialogues. As the researcher and facilitator, I enlisted participant feedback for both the pilot and primary mural projects, and led the transformation of both efforts onto their respective walls in the center. I used a visual journal to document the research. My arts based findings are centered on visual vignettes and artistic renderings made in response to the finished mural projects. In translating the impact and value of collaboration through art making, I argue in favor of involving the participant voice in all phases of the creative process. In addition to providing a workbook for initiating similar hands-on opportunities, I focus on the potential of executing murals with people rather than for them. / A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Art Education in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education. / Fall Semester 2018. / November 8, 2018. / Aesthetic Identity, Arts Based Community Engagement, Community Engagement, Community Murals, Creative Placemaking, Empowerment / Includes bibliographical references. / Sara S. Shields, Professor Directing Dissertation; Stephen Tripodi, University Representative; Pat Villeneuve, Committee Member; Jeff Broome, Committee Member.
6

Visualization of Invisible Disabilities an Arts Based Exploration of Disability Identity Development

Unknown Date (has links)
This research investigates how arts based research methods contribute to the development of a positive disability identity for a person living with invisible disabilities through the act of un/covering. Through the theoretical framework of critical disability studies, the intersection of identity, embodiment and agency are explored via narrative and visual methods of inquiry including reflexive journaling, drawing, watercolor and sculpture. The heuristic process of arts based reflexivity is then used as a means to create a comprehensive portrait of the disability experience. This study concludes with research implications that address teacher preparedness and the need for critical awareness in relation to complex concepts of critical disability studies such as performativity, vulnerability, the transitioning nature of identity. / A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Art Education in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. / Fall Semester 2018. / November 15, 2018. / Art Education, Arts Based Research, Disability Studies, Identity Development, Invisible Disabilities, Un/covering / Includes bibliographical references. / Rachel Fendler, Professor Directing Dissertation; Jim Dawkins, University Representative; Sara Scott Shields, Committee Member; Jeff Broome, Committee Member; Skip Horack, Committee Member.
7

Experimenting with Art-Infused Civic Activities to Promote School and Community Engagement among Disaffected Adolescent Students

Unknown Date (has links)
Engagement among adolescents is a crucial factor for identity formation and positive youth development (Barker, 2015; Kegan, 1994). To help address disengagement, socially engaged art education (SEAE) practices have emerged, combining art with action-oriented curricula to critically examine the community and connect to it through meaningful experiences (Helguera, 2011). This current study aimed to better understand how the social dynamics at school and in the student’s own neighborhood impacted the roots of engagement, particularly from school and the larger community, and to address the need to understand interventions that engage, such as those led by art. To study youth engagement in the context of disenfranchised school environments, I designed a pragmatic informed participatory research study, which included six art-infused civic activities that incorporated reflection, action, and artful dialogue framed by Reason’s (1994) co-operative inquiry process. Through this research approach, I explored the perceptions that 16 12th-grade high school students had about their community and their desire to connect and to serve. Using an embedded mixed-methods design (Creswell, 2014), the art-infused civic activities and data collection took place simultaneously. The methods used included questionnaires and surveys, field observations, participant-produced documents, visual methods, interviews, and focus groups. An analysis of the data yielded several findings regarding the participants’ perceptions and connections to their community. For the participants in this study, community was the product of finding and discovering commonalities and feeling safe, as well as having opportunities to attain new skills. The students identified a lot of deficiencies at school, which led them to feel that school was not part of their community. However, despite this apathy, the students expressed appreciation for opportunities that allowed them to bond with their peers and teachers. Engagement in the art-infused civic activities resulted in students attaining newly formed perspectives about their peers and the school staff. The participants reported viewing them as having the capacity to show a caring side. Through these activities, they also saw themselves as more empathetic and able to make an impact in their community. Although some of the participants had been involved in service activities prior to this study, they felt that in this study the experiences were more meaningful because they were able to reflect and understand the magnitude of their contribution. Even though most participants expressed having a desire to help both their community and school, they also felt that this could not be accomplished until they became financially stable. This study contributes to the field of art education by examining the viability of art projects that aim to address youth disengagement, and to better understand the impact that art education has on youth engagement dynamics in the context of low-SES communities. / A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Art Education in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. / Summer Semester 2017. / June 29, 2017. / Civic Engagement, Community Engagement, Participatory Research, Photovoice, Service-Learning, Youth Engagement / Includes bibliographical references. / Theresa Van Lith, Professor Directing Dissertation; Peter Easton, University Representative; Rachel Fendler, Committee Member; Sara Scott Shields, Committee Member.
8

Analyzing art works through components affecting visual expression

Unseld, Teresa S. 03 June 2011 (has links)
Studies and research in art education have centered mostly upon curriculum issues, creativity development, and perceptual or cognitive skills. The purpose of this study was to :identify, isolate, and define various components of expression relating to visual art. The literature suggests various aspects of expression inherent in viewing and forming visual art, but the connections between these components appear unclear. An explanatory theoretical framework was therefore developed as a logical means of portraying and examining components affecting visual expression and their potential relationships.The problem of the study focuses on two research questions: (1) what components of expression can be identified within the literature of art and art education, and (2) what theoretical relationships can be hypothesized among these components: The purpose of the study was to develop a t :eoretical framework utilizing expressive components which might generate furtherr knowledge of expression in the visual arts.The methodology develops the procedures involved in determining what factors affect expression within the visual arts and suggests possible theoretical ponents of visual art expression are:General Response,interrelatedness among these components. The procedures consisted of: (1) conducting an exploratory research to determine factors thought to affect visual expression, (2) defining and examining features of theory models, (3) investigating the functions of theory types, and(4) examining and utilizing appropriate techniques necessary to develop a theory model. The initial research resulted in consideration of expression in three areas: the artist, the art product, and the response of the observer.The result of the research is the Expressive Components Model. In a cybernetic theory framework, the model provides a basis for explaining, interpreting, and suggesting the functions and relationships of individual factors affecting visual expression. The identified comSelective Response, Conceptual Planning, Aesthetic Response, Production, Reaction, and the Art Product. The procedures used for selection of components considered significant in analyzing art forms are detailed in the section depicting the model development.The culmination chapter summarizes and provides implications and recommendations for art education purposes. Observations drawn from the study are presented as they relate to the purpose of the study and to the Expressive Components Model. Development of the Expressi°vve Components 3Model may be useful in defining and examining the expressive qualities found in art works. Art education usage of the model may be the most worthwhile result of the research. Students of art may respond with a be `ter understanding of how and why an art work is expressive instead of relying solely on intuition and feeling. Most importantly, the Expressive Components Model may generate additional research on expression and the components which seem to affect visual expression in the arts.
9

Career skills needed to be a successful artist: Finding links between art teachers' practices and artists' beliefs

Dohm, Alexandra Maria Ethlyn January 2000 (has links)
By interviewing professional artists, I explore the career skills fine artists perceive as necessary for financial success in the art world. Through interviews with art teachers, I examine how these necessary career concepts are being taught in elementary and secondary art classrooms. I also discuss reasons for insufficient implementation of career skills and provide suggestions for how art teachers can improve their career education curriculum.
10

Examining relationship building in a donor participation program for the arts in higher education: A case study of selected members of the Medici Circle and the College of Fine Arts at the University of Arizona

Metcalfe, Jason Lauth January 2000 (has links)
High quality relationships between philanthropic organizations and their donors are central to the success of development and fund raising practices. The purpose of this study was to examine what components in a philanthropic relationship influence "relationship building" between a philanthropic organization and its donor base. A philanthropic program supporting the fine arts in higher education was used as the basis for a case study. Theories relating to philanthropy and social psychology were used to guide the research. Eight donors were interviewed and qualitative research methods were employed to analyze the data. Results indicated that creatively communicating the results of a donor's involvement, building a social and/or advocacy reference group, and utilizing dynamic leaders in donor relations valuably contribute to building high quality philanthropic relationships.

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