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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
31

'Same hell, different horrors' : women in the Holocaust : testimony into fiction

Johnson, Jay 2001 (has links)
No description available.
32

Inducing false memories

Matheson, Mark Philip 1999 (has links)
No description available.
33

Directed forgetting of autobiographical events

Oakes, Mark A. 2005 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 2005. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 143-149).
34

Mechanisms Linking Early Behavioral Inhibition to Later Social Functioning: The Role of Autobiographical Memory Biases

Levin, Laura 1 January 2008 (has links)
This study examined the associations between behavioral inhibition in early childhood and patterns of social-emotional functioning in adolescence. As part of a larger longitudinal study on temperament and social development, adolescents who were recruited as infants completed two tasks to assess social-cognitive biases at follow-up: an information-processing task and an autobiographical memory task. The information-processing task assessed adolescents? interpretations of ambiguous situations. Next, adolescents completed an autobiographical memory task where they were exposed to both social and neutral-cued words, and recalled the first memory that came to mind. Memories were coded for specificity, affective tone, response latency, and emotional intensity. Afterwards, adolescents were also presented with a word recall task. In addition, shyness and socially anxious behaviors were observed as adolescents participated in a self-presentation speech task with an unfamiliar peer. Behavioral inhibition at age two was found to predict higher levels of observed anxious behaviors (self-presentation anxiety) during the peer interaction. This relation appears to be mediated by a pattern of blunted affect in response to socially-cued autobiographical memories. While the relation between temperament ratings of early behavioral inhibition and the blunted memory affect was content-specific to social-cued words, current self-presentation anxiety during the peer interaction was related to a more generalized bias that was not content-specific. In addition to the blunted memory affect, adolescent self-presentation anxiety was associated with less affective interpretations on the story task, poorer word recall, slowed response times, decreased emotional intensity.
35

Measuring Visual Perspective in Autobiographical Memory Across Time Periods and Events

Rice, Heather Joy 2007 (has links)
Visual perspective in the context of autobiographical memory research refers to the point of view from which an individual constructs a visual image of a past event. While the number of studies focusing on this phenomenological aspect of retrieval has increased in the last decade, a basic understanding of the meaning of perspective and its fundamental characteristics has not been fully established. The current studies attempt to further this understanding. The first series of studies examine the role of memory age in perspective using continuous scales to measure self-reported perspective. These studies show memories change in a linear fashion, from first- to third-person perspective, as memories become more remote. Furthermore, individuals report more than one perspective during a single retrieval episode, females report more third-person perspective than do males, and individual differences in perspective use were observed. These individual differences were not accounted for by personality differences, such as levels of public self-consciousness. A second series of studies asked participants to describe the location of their visual perspective, rather than using continuous scales. These studies show visual perspective location varies greatly and consistently across space and for different events. For example, memories of giving a presentation were more likely to be visualized from in front of the individual, whereas memories of running from a threat were visualized from behind the individual. Although perspective location varies across events and space, location did not affect other phenomenological aspects of retrieval, such as memory vividness, belief in the accuracy of one's memory, or the degree of reliving experienced, nor did location map onto the ideal location for watching an event unfold or for watching one's self complete a task. Together these studies further characterize visual perspective during retrieval, suggesting it is more complex than a simple, dichotomous distinction between first- and third-person perspective. Additionally, they highlight the importance of understanding the phenomenological experience of perspective in order to appreciate its significance in other domains. Dissertation
36

Surrendered resistance playing dead in American autobiographical writing, 1840-1933

Kreiger, Georgia R. Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--West Virginia University, 2006. Title from document title page. Document formatted into pages; contains v, 271 p. Includes abstract. Includes bibliographical references (p. 252-271).
37

Je est un autre: multiple selves in autobiographical fictions. Multiple selves in autobiographical fictions

2004 (has links)
Wong Chun-chi. Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2004. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 95-98). Abstracts in English and Chinese.
38

The responsibility of memory : poems

Chavez, Sarah A. 2007 (has links)
This creative thesis consists of a collection of original poetry. The poems, written in the style of the confessional, follow one speaker through the trials and joys of family, neighborhood community, work, and self. Though the poems do not follow a narrative or chronological path, they are organized by theme and subject matter. The cohesive thread that runs through the collection is the exploration of the question of both personal and societal responsibility. The speaker in the poems constantly challenges the expectations and conventions of responsibility by looking back on the events and situations that brought her to where she is in the present of the collection. Department of English
39

Autobiographical memory in posttraumatic stress disorder

Sutherland, Kylie Anne, Psychology, Faculty of Science, UNSW 2006 (has links)
This program of research investigated the nature and processes of autobiographical memory deficits in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Study 1 examined the proposition that difficulties in the retrieval of specific memories present a risk factor for posttraumatic psychopathology. A prospective study of fire-fighters found that a significant predictor of posttraumatic stress was a deficit in retrieving specific memories to positive cues before trauma. Study 2 investigated whether autobiographical retrieval deficits in PTSD can be modified by psychological treatment. Results found that as PTSD symptoms reduced following treatment, individuals with PTSD retrieved more specific memories to positive cues. Together, these results indicated that specific retrieval deficits to positive cues present a vulnerability factor for PTSD. However, this memory style appears to be receptive to modification following therapy. Study 3 investigated the association between autobiographical retrieval deficits and impaired problemsolving in PTSD. Participants with PTSD retrieved more overgeneral categoric memories and took longer to retrieve memories than non-PTSD trauma controls. This deficit was associated with impaired social problem-solving, suggesting that specific retrieval is related to successful problem solving. In an analogue design, Studies 4 and 5 investigated the proposition that resource limitations may underpin autobiographical retrieval deficits. Results generally supported the proposal that reduced cognitive resources may be a mechanism contributing to specific retrieval deficits. Studies 6 and 7 examined rumination as another possible mechanism responsible for these retrieval deficits. Study 6 found high anxious participants retrieved fewer specific memories to positive cues following rumination, compared to distraction. Study 7 found evidence that negative rumination in the high anxious group increased categoric retrieval, whereas positive rumination had no effect. Study 8 found retrieval of trauma-related self-defining memories was strongly associated with personal goals connected to the trauma. Study 9 found that discrepancies in one???s self construct were related to the retrieval of trauma memories to positive cues. This program of research extends current theories of autobiographical memory by identifying risk, maintenance, and recovery factors in the context of PTSD.
40

Autobiographical memory in posttraumatic stress disorder

Sutherland, Kylie Anne, Psychology, Faculty of Science, UNSW 2006 (has links)
This program of research investigated the nature and processes of autobiographical memory deficits in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Study 1 examined the proposition that difficulties in the retrieval of specific memories present a risk factor for posttraumatic psychopathology. A prospective study of fire-fighters found that a significant predictor of posttraumatic stress was a deficit in retrieving specific memories to positive cues before trauma. Study 2 investigated whether autobiographical retrieval deficits in PTSD can be modified by psychological treatment. Results found that as PTSD symptoms reduced following treatment, individuals with PTSD retrieved more specific memories to positive cues. Together, these results indicated that specific retrieval deficits to positive cues present a vulnerability factor for PTSD. However, this memory style appears to be receptive to modification following therapy. Study 3 investigated the association between autobiographical retrieval deficits and impaired problemsolving in PTSD. Participants with PTSD retrieved more overgeneral categoric memories and took longer to retrieve memories than non-PTSD trauma controls. This deficit was associated with impaired social problem-solving, suggesting that specific retrieval is related to successful problem solving. In an analogue design, Studies 4 and 5 investigated the proposition that resource limitations may underpin autobiographical retrieval deficits. Results generally supported the proposal that reduced cognitive resources may be a mechanism contributing to specific retrieval deficits. Studies 6 and 7 examined rumination as another possible mechanism responsible for these retrieval deficits. Study 6 found high anxious participants retrieved fewer specific memories to positive cues following rumination, compared to distraction. Study 7 found evidence that negative rumination in the high anxious group increased categoric retrieval, whereas positive rumination had no effect. Study 8 found retrieval of trauma-related self-defining memories was strongly associated with personal goals connected to the trauma. Study 9 found that discrepancies in one???s self construct were related to the retrieval of trauma memories to positive cues. This program of research extends current theories of autobiographical memory by identifying risk, maintenance, and recovery factors in the context of PTSD.

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