• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 36
  • 15
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 93
  • 29
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 20
  • 19
  • 18
  • 15
  • 15
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 8
  • 8
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

Women-Loving-Women Portrayals in Fiction, a Critical Literature Review

Walker, La Shea 06 1900 (has links)
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) / This critical literature review explores the ways in which scholars have discussed depictions of fictional women-loving women (WLW) in film and on television in the past five years. This study is guided by both sexual script theory and the intersectional perspective. Prior studies of WLW in fiction have largely focused on the areas of homonormativity, race, bisexual-erasure, WLW stereotypes, gender dynamics, WLW communities, and post-modern representation. Earlier research has focused on those areas to the exclusion of giving more attention to exploring the use of queerbaiting in modern storytelling. Future research should include analyses of more recently featured fictional WLW characters and WLW relationships in film and on television in addition to more research on queerbaiting overall.
22

Bisexual Relationships: Investigating the Impact of Attitudes Regarding Bisexuality on  Relationship Satisfaction Among Female Same-Gender Couples

Nedela, Mary Rachel 30 January 2020 (has links)
Bisexual individuals experience negativity toward their identities from heterosexual as well as gay and lesbian individuals. While there is a large body of research on the negative mental health consequences due to bi-negativity among individuals who identify as bisexual, little research exists exploring the relational impacts of bi-negativity. Informed by symbolic interaction theory and minority stress theory, this study investigated the impacts of attitudes regarding bisexuality on relationship satisfaction in female same-gender couples with at least one bisexual-identified individual through the following research questions: (a) How, if at all, do the attitudes toward bisexuality of individual partners influence perceptions of relationship satisfaction? and (b) How do partners negotiate the influence of attitudes toward bisexuality on their relationship? To address these questions, data from semi-structured interviews of eight female same-gender couples were analyzed using constructivist grounded theory methodology. Findings indicated that couples moved through a process of the following: pre-relationship factors, relationship formation, relational emotion work, and shared relational meaning. Couples additionally are influenced in each phase of the process by macrosystemic oppressions. Clinical implications to assist mental health professionals better serve these couples were determined. / Doctor of Philosophy / Bisexual individuals experience negativity toward their identities from heterosexual as well as gay and lesbian individuals. While there is a large body of research on the negative mental health consequences due to bi-negativity among individuals who identify as bisexual, more research is need on the relational impacts of bi-negativity. Informed by symbolic interaction theory and minority stress theory, this study investigated the impact of attitudes regarding bisexuality on relationship satisfaction in female same-gender couples with at least one bisexual-identified individual. Eight couples were interviewed, and data was analyzed using constructivist grounded theory methodology. Findings indicated that couples moved through a process of the following: pre-relationship factors, relationship formation, relational emotion work, and shared relational meaning. Couples additionally are influenced in each phase of the process by macrosystemic oppressions. Clinical implications to assist mental health professionals better serve these couples were determined.
23

Privatsache und unerheblich für Unternehmen? Der Stand der Personalforschung zur "sexuellen Orientierung"

Köllen, Thomas January 2012 (has links) (PDF)
In Deutschland und Europa setzen immer mehr Unternehmen Maßnahmen zur "sexuellen Orientierung", zumeist im Rahmen von aktuell an Bedeutung gewinnenden Diversity Management-Ansätzen. Vor diesem Hintergrund gibt der Artikel einen strukturierten Überblick über den Stand der Personalforschung in diesem Bereich. Neben wenigen Studien zu Bi- und Transsexualität bezieht sich der größte Teil der Forschung auf das Phänomen Homosexualität und lässt sich in drei thematische Gruppen unterteilen: 1. der Umgang mit der eigenen Homosexualität am Arbeitsplatz, 2. das Arbeits- und Organisationsklima für Lesben und Schwule und 3. der organisationale Umgang mit Homosexualität bzw. der "sexuellen Orientierung". Es zeigt sich, dass schwule, lesbische, bisexuelle und auch transidente Beschäftigte unterschiedlichen Barrieren am Arbeitsplatz begegnen und entsprechende Maßnahmen von Unternehmensseite dazu beitragen können, diese abzubauen. Es wird diskutiert, inwieweit sich daraus positive ökonomische Konsequenzen für Unternehmen ergeben können. (author's abstract)
24

BI AII means: the trouble with Tong Zhi discourse : beyond queer looks in the East is red and Swordsman II

Mak, Hoi-shan, Anson, 麥海珊 January 2000 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Comparative Literature / Master / Master of Philosophy
25

From Mrs. Dalloway to The hours : bisexuality/bitextuality and ècriture fèminine /

Lee, Chi-kwan, Anita. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Hong Kong, 2005.
26

From Mrs. Dalloway to The Hours bisexuality/bitextuality and écriture féminine /

Lee, Chi-kwan, Anita. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Hong Kong, 2005. / Also available in print.
27

Bisexual men's identities: (re)defining what it means to be bi. / Bisexual men's identities: redefining what it means to be bi. / Bisexual men's meaning(s): (re)defining what it means to be bi.

Poole, Lisa Dianne 26 August 2011 (has links)
Bisexual identity is formed within the constraints of a heteronormative framework which is infused with power, promotes stability and alignment of apparently binary sex, gender identity, and gender roles, as well as promoting procreation, monosexuality and monogamy. Heteronormative models of sexuality fail to capture the complexity, ambiguity, multiplicity, and fluidity of bisexual experience. Using data collected through interviews with twelve self-identified bisexual men this research explores questions of how bisexual men make sense of what it means to be bisexual within a heteronormative framework of sexuality and if they disrupt or reproduce dominant understandings of sexuality. I found these bisexual men sometimes conformed to a dominant framework; however, as an example of how identity can be unstable in both meaning and expression they also took up a provisional bisexual identity and disrupted dominant discourses by redefining bisexual meanings – offering alternatives to the binary, gender based definitions of sexuality, and monosexuality. / Graduate
28

Straddling (In)Visibility: Representations of Bisexual Women in Twenty-First Century Popular Culture

Cocarla, Sasha January 2016 (has links)
Throughout the first decade of the 2000s, LGBTQ+ visibility has steadily increased in North American popular culture, allowing for not only more LGBTQ+ characters/figures to surface, but also establishing more diverse and nuanced representations and storylines. Bisexuality, while being part of the increasingly popular phrase of inclusivity (LGBTQ+), however, is one sexuality that not only continues to be overlooked within popular culture but that also continues to be represented in limited ways. In this doctoral thesis I examine how bisexual women are represented within mainstream popular culture, in particular on American television, focusing on two, popular programs (The L Word and the Shot At Love series). These texts have been chosen for popularity and visibility in mainstream media and culture, as well as for how bisexual women are unprecedentedly made central to many of the storylines (The L Word) and the series as a whole (Shot At Love). This analysis provides not only a detailed historical account of bisexual visibility but also discusses bisexuality thematically, highlighting commonalities across bisexual representations as well as shared themes between and with other identities. By examining key examples of bisexuality in popular culture from the first decade of the twenty-first century, my research investigates how representations of bisexuality are often portrayed in conversation with hegemonic understandings of gender and sexuality, specifically highlighting the mainstream "gay rights" movement's narrative of "normality" and "just like you" politics. Finally, it is in recognizing how representations of bisexuality are framed by specific reoccurring themes/tropes, as well as how these themes/tropes work together within larger social, cultural, and political climates, that it becomes possible to challenge existing gender and sexuality norms and ideals and create a more nuanced and complex understanding of bisexuality.
29

Me, Myself and BI: An Expression of Sexuality

January 2011 (has links)
abstract: Bisexuality is a unique kind of sexual identity, as a gray area between heterosexuality and homosexuality. The piece You made up the Story and I Played with all the Parts explores bisexuality as a lived artistic experience based on my sexual journey within a society that advocates heterosexuality. The piece includes movement phrases and text derived from conversations with intimate partners, characters based on former partners, storytelling, a 1950s-style sex education video parody, and audience participation via dialogue. The creation of movement and dialogue manipulated heteronormative social stigmas into a canny social acceptance of bisexuality. The multifaceted nature of the piece provokes viewers to consider how sexuality is constructed socially through my own interpretation. As a result, the work suggests that bisexuality is a legitimate sexual identity and represents a culture within American society. / Dissertation/Thesis / M.F.A. Dance 2011
30

Speculative Fictions, Bisexual Lives: Changing Frameworks of Sexual Desire

Wilde, Jenee 18 August 2015 (has links)
While studies of lesbian, gay, and transgender communities and cultural production have dramatically increased, research on bisexuality remains highly undervalued in humanities and social science disciplines. To challenge this lack of scholarship, this doctoral dissertation applies both textual and ethnographic methods to examine bisexual representation in non-realistic or “speculative” narratives and to explore the insider perspectives of bisexual people who are also science fiction fans. The overall trajectory of chapters follows a progression from grounded research and analysis to theory and application. First, I explore bisexual worldviews through ethnographic research in overlapping sexual and fan communities and through textual analysis of a 1980s bisexual fanzine. Next, I establish theoretical and methodological foundations for a new sexual paradigm, called dimensional sexuality, and work to intervene in interpretive methods that may restrict readings of sexuality in cinematic narratives. And finally, I test dimensional sexuality as an interpretive mode by offering dimensional readings of science fiction television and novels. From one direction, the project seeks to understand bisexuality as a position from which to theorize sexual knowledge. A major claim is that bisexual epistemology offers an alternative to dominant monosexual frameworks. Specifically, the multivalent logic of bisexuality refutes the “either-or” structure of heterosexuality and homosexuality. By embracing the logic of “both-and,” bisexuality as a category of knowledge enables the reorganization of sexuality within a non-binary, non-gender based multidimensional framework. From another direction, the project demonstrates the productive textual and social spaces offered by speculative narratives for questioning what we “know” about gender, sex, sexuality, and other intersections of social identities. Science fiction bears a deep structural affinity with the dialectical thinking found in critical theory. By asking “what if” questions that challenge our assumptions about “what is,” non-realistic narratives estrange us from the “known” world, interrogate our assumptions about the world, and make visible ideas and experiences outside of the norms we use to interpret what is “real” in a particular social and historical moment. As such, speculative narratives enable us to imagine sexual and gender possibilities beyond the episteme of the moment.

Page generated in 0.0309 seconds