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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

Lived experiences of lesbian-identified women who abuse alcohol: An interpretative phenomenological analysis

McKenzie, Sharon Lynda January 2019 (has links)
Magister Artium (Psychology) - MA(Psych) / Although research has shown that alcohol abuse in the Western Cape is amongst the highest in South Africa, lesbian-identified women have largely been ignored in this area of research. International literature has identified alcohol abuse amongst lesbian-identified women as a significant problem, with alcohol consumption rates considerably higher than their heterosexual counterparts. This interpretative phenomenological analysis explored lesbian-identified women’s lived experiences (n = 25) with alcohol abuse through in-depth semi-structured interviews, in order to gain insight into their motivations for abusing alcohol and the impact this had on their lives and relationships. The core theme that emerged from the analysis of participants’ narratives was that alcohol abuse was related to coping with emotional distress and pain. The emotional distress participants experienced was due to their sexual minority status and encompassed aspects related to internalised homophobia, escaping pain, rejection, discrimination based on sexual orientation, mental health issues, patriarchy, heteronormativity, and homophobia. Results substantiate the need for the development of prevention, intervention, and support strategies, aimed specifically at sexual minority groups, in order to facilitate effective coping with sexual minority stress, mental health issues, and other distresses related to alcohol abuse.
42

Exploring how gay men manage their gay identity in the workplace

Roberts, Simon Peter January 2014 (has links)
In the UK, as in many western nations, there have been a number of progressive pieces of legislation enacted with the intent to eradicate discrimination on the basis of sexuality in the workplace. The pace and scale of acceptance of gay equality laws has been relatively rapid in recent years. To cite an example, in 2004 gay marriage was only legal in Belgium and Holland, whereas in 2013 it is legal in 11 countries (The Guardian, 2013). Up until this legislation came into force, the focus of previous research probably unsurprisingly has been predominately around two strands; sexual minorities’ experiences of discrimination in the workplace and the issue of disclosure/non-disclosure of a gay identity. There has been little exploration ‘beyond the closet’, in how gay men manage their identity post anti-discrimination laws combined with more liberal attitudes towards homosexuality. In particular, there has been a paucity of research on the ways gay men challenge, negotiate and conform in the two way process of managing their identities; this thesis aims to address this gap. Data were gathered from forty-five semi-structured in-depth interviews with self-identified gay men in a wide range of occupations and ages working in a seaside resort on the South coast of England. A qualitative methodology was used in order to obtain a deeper understanding of the ways gay men manage their gay identity in their interaction with others. Furthermore, by using reflexivity this thesis aims to show how the sample of respondents had modified and changed the ways they presented their gay identity throughout their working lives. In particular, the thesis aims to uncover critical incidents based upon their sexuality that respondents confronted in their interaction with others. The key findings that emerged from the data include; the identification of a range of strategies gay men deployed in how they managed their identity and dealt with discrimination from confrontation to conformity; the multiple constraints and opportunities that impacted upon the ways gay men both managed and disclosed their gay identity; the perceived incongruity around positions of authority, professionalism and a gay identity; and finally how silence was used as a form of exclusion creating significant barriers in the ways gay men could make themselves visible and use their voice within organisations. These findings considerably extend our understanding of the pervasiveness of heteronormativity in the workplace; the impact of contextual influences on managing a gay identity, and gay men’s experiences against a back drop of post-anti-discrimination laws in the U.K. The thesis will aid HR practitioners in giving them a better understanding of the dilemmas gay men face in their interactions with others in the workplace.
43

Power and Pleasure: Heteronormativity and Homophobia in Heterosexual Sex

Stewart, Lauren 06 September 2018 (has links)
How do sex practices get constructed as normal? This research evaluates discussions of pegging, a gender non-conforming sex practice within heterosexual sex whereby women anally penetrate men. Data were collected from the website Reddit and its subreddit r/sex. 3,485 comments posted to 30 discussion threads were analyzed for common themes. Findings suggest that pegging confuses gendered expectations for “having sex”. Additionally, heteronormativity and homophobia were found to structure heterosexual interactions, including the ways in which gender and sexual identities, desire, and bodies are understood. This is illuminated by findings supporting “gender accountability” or the idea that we “do gender” because people anticipate how others will perceive their actions based on gender expectations. Finally, an examination of homophobia reveals ways in which homophobia operates in a hate-free zone. Homophobia was found to encourage heterosexuals’ treatment of homosexuals as distinctly different kinds of people than heterosexuals, including frequent boundary setting between what is gay and straight. Overall this project reveals that pegging is a culturally unintelligible sex act that causes a great deal of confusion, anxiety, and sometimes pleasure for those who partake.
44

Challenges faced by gay and lesbian students at the University of Limpopo (Turfloop Campus)

Letsoalo, Daniel Lesiba January 2016 (has links)
Thesis (M. A. (Clinical Psychology)) -- University of Limpopo, 2016 / A qualitative study was conducted to investigate challenges faced by gay and lesbian students at the University of Limpopo (Turfloop Campus). Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. Purposive sampling (snowball sampling) was used to find participants for focus groups. Data were analysed using Thematic Content Analysis (TCA). The results of this study gave an insight into challenges faced by lesbian and gay students at the University of Limpopo (Turfloop Campus). It also indicated the impact of these challenges on their psychological, emotional and academic functioning. Results indicate that gay and lesbian students face a multitude of problems on campus environment which includes among other things bullying, discrimination, victimisation, abuse, academic disruption and derogatory remarks from their peers (heterosexual students) and staff members. KEYWORDS: Homophobia, LGBTI, Discrimination, Prejudice, sexuality.
45

Lived experiences of lesbian-identified women who abuse alcohol: An interpretative phenomenological analysis

McKenzie, Sharon Lynda January 2018 (has links)
Magister Artium (Psychology) - MA(Psych) / Although research has shown that alcohol abuse in the Western Cape is amongst the highest in South Africa, lesbian-identified women have largely been ignored in this area of research. International literature has identified alcohol abuse amongst lesbian-identified women as a significant problem, with alcohol consumption rates considerably higher than their heterosexual counterparts. This interpretative phenomenological analysis explored lesbianidentified women’s lived experiences (n = 25) with alcohol abuse through in-depth semistructured interviews, in order to gain insight into their motivations for abusing alcohol and the impact this had on their lives and relationships. The core theme that emerged from the analysis of participants’ narratives was that alcohol abuse was related to coping with emotional distress and pain. The emotional distress participants experienced was due to their sexual minority status and encompassed aspects related to internalised homophobia, escaping pain, rejection, discrimination based on sexual orientation, mental health issues, patriarchy, heteronormativity, and homophobia. Results substantiate the need for the development of prevention, intervention, and support strategies, aimed specifically at sexual minority groups, in order to facilitate effective coping with sexual minority stress, mental health issues, and other distresses related to alcohol abuse.
46

Teacher educators' practice of queer-care : a necessary expansion of Noddings' model care

Benson, Fiona. January 2008 (has links)
This study explores the hitherto unexamined phenomenon of queer-care in higher education from the teacher educators' perspectives. While care in education has been the subject of scholarly interest for many years and demonstrating caring for the wellbeing of students is an important component of teaching, the lack of attention to queer-care is a significant oversight in the body of care research and teacher education. Pertinent to this study is the investigation of how well Noddings' enactments of care (modeling, dialogue, practice, and confirmation) address the care needs of queer students. / Four teacher educators shared stories of their efforts to care for the emotional wellbeing of their queer students. As the fifth teacher educator in this work, I investigate my journey to becoming a queer-care practitioner, and my own practice of queer-care. The theoretical frameworks of qualitative and phenomenological research and feminist theory undergird this study. Two processes of analysis were employed, the first being the key sensitizing concepts of Noddings' enactments of care as points of entry into an understanding of the teacher educators' narratives of queer-care. The second level of analysis used the insights so gleaned to guide the focus of the self-study undertaken in this work. / Analysis of the teacher educators' narratives indicates that the practice of queer-care, while sharing certain similarities, is idiosyncratic, complicated, lonely, and often exhausting work. Alongside these findings are indicators that queer-care as practiced by these teacher educators is welcomed by queer students as being all too rare in their university experience, and of benefit to their sense of wellbeing. Findings also reveal that Noddings' enactments of care neither include nor address the particular care needs of queer students. This led me to identify particular care needs of queer students as being those of unwavering discretion, absolute safety, full social membership, and unstinting succour. This necessary awareness expands Noddings' model of care allowing it to include and be responsive to queer students. / This research has implications for teacher educators and any educators concerned with the wellbeing of queer students. It provides suggestions to enrich caring practice in teacher education programs and field experience.
47

Is it because I'm gay? :the effect of sexual orientation on perceived discrimination: a cross-cultural study

Kim, Sarang Unknown Date (has links)
Previous research have theorized that causes of the psychological distress faced by lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals (LGBs) are stigma and discrimination they face in the society. Perceptions of discrimination, whether it actually occurs or not, also affect behaviours. This project investigated whether non-heterosexuals (LGBs) perceive more discrimination than do heterosexuals in the same given situations. In Study 1, LGBs’ levels of perceived discrimination in non-discriminatory situations (those where no actual discrimination took place) were compared with the responses of heterosexuals. In addition, Study 1 also examined which psychological well-being related variables (internalized heterosexism (homophobia), marginalization, isolation, alienation, self-esteem, and satisfaction with life) contributed most to perceptions of discrimination. Five hundred and sixty adults (355 Korean, 205 Australian) participated in the study through an online survey. Major findings were: only the Australian LGBs but not the Korean LGBs showed significantly higher levels of perceived discrimination than did heterosexual counterparts. Using a priming stimulus did not increase the perception of discrimination; heterosexuals were more aware of others knowing their sexual orientation than LGBs. Alienation was the variable that most related to perceived discrimination. Study 1 had used only situations where no actual discrimination was included or intended. This study also showed that there were a number of differences between the Australian and Korean samples: Korean LGBs had significantly lower psychological well-being; and most of the Korean LGBs were in Stage 4 (acceptance) whereas the majority of Australian LGBs were in Stage 6 (synthesis). Further cross-cultural studies are needed. Study 2 examined the responses of perceived discrimination using an actual discriminatory scenario and a non-discriminatory scenario. It also examined the relationships between outness and perceived discrimination; and between previous experience of discrimination and perceived discrimination. Sixty six Australian university students (44 females, 21 males, and one gender unidentified) participated in this second study. Major findings were: significant differences were found in perceived discrimination between the nondiscriminatory and discriminatory scenario situations for all participants, between heterosexuals and LGBs, between lesbians and heterosexual women, but not between lesbian women and gay men. No correlation was found between outness and perceived discrimination in either the discriminatory or the non-discriminatory situations. However, previous experience of discrimination was correlated sharply with perceptions of discrimination in both scenarios.
48

An investigation into the relationship between homophobic attitudes of female grade 12 students and parental attitudes.

Cahill, Susan Mary. January 2000 (has links)
Prejudice can be defined as the possession of negative attitudes or beliefs that have the potential for people to behave in a discriminatory or hostile manner toward a person because they belong to a certain group. It is believed that attitudes are passed on and communicated inter-generationally. In this context attitudes were examined in a sample of Grade 12 pupils and their parents to establish whether there was a relationship between adolescents and parents attitudes toward homosexuals. Results support the hypothesis that parents' attitudes impact on daughters' attitudes but more specifically that daughters' attitudes are more closely related to mothers' attitudes than they are to fathers' attitudes. Findings for the Attitude Toward Lesbian and Gay men scale revealed that respondents demonstrated more negative attitudes toward gay men than they did toward lesbians, with male respondents (fathers) being more homophobic than females (mothers and daughters). These findings are discussed in terms oftheir implications for research, education strategies, and legislative amendments. / Thesis (M.Soc.Sci.)-University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2000.
49

The impact of internalised homophobia and coping strategies on psychological distress following the experience of sexual prejudice

Cornish, Michael James January 2012 (has links)
It is widely accepted that the LGB (Lesbian, gay and bisexual) population have a higher risk of psychological distress compared to their heterosexual counterparts. Meyer (2003) proposed the minority stress model to explain this increased prevalence. This model proposed that the LGB population are subjected to additional stressors due to their minority status which results in the increased psychological distress observed. The purpose of this study was to investigate some of the risk factors proposed by this model, specifically experiences of sexual prejudice, negative internalised beliefs about homosexuality/bisexuality, coping strategies and how these factors interact to influence the development of psychological distress. This study included 542 LGB individuals who completed measures of sexual prejudice, internalised homophobia, coping strategies and current levels of psychological distress using an online survey. The study found a high prevalence of sexual prejudice within the sample, with 84% of the sample reporting at least one experience of sexual prejudice. 67% reported being verbally abused and 17% reported being physically assaulted. A high number of participants scored above the cut-off for a diagnosis of depression (27%) and anxiety (19%). Regression and path analysis revealed that maladaptive coping had the strongest effect on psychological distress. Sexual prejudice and internalised homophobia, also both had a significant direct impact upon psychological distress, and they were also partially mediated by maladaptive coping. Problem-focused coping was found to be a protective factor with a direct, albeit weak, effect on psychological distress. Problem-focused coping also partially mediated the relationship between sexual prejudice and psychological distress, slightly reducing the negative impact of sexual prejudice. The results suggest that maladaptive coping was the greatest risk factor, out of the ones measured, in the development of psychological distress in the LGB population. The outcomes suggest that clinical psychologists may wish to target their interventions at the development of more adaptive coping strategies, and the reduction of internalised homophobia. They should consider ways to reduce experiences of sexual prejudice by working at a community level to reduce the stigma of homosexuality/bisexuality.
50

Is it because I'm gay? :the effect of sexual orientation on perceived discrimination: a cross-cultural study

Kim, Sarang Unknown Date (has links)
Previous research have theorized that causes of the psychological distress faced by lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals (LGBs) are stigma and discrimination they face in the society. Perceptions of discrimination, whether it actually occurs or not, also affect behaviours. This project investigated whether non-heterosexuals (LGBs) perceive more discrimination than do heterosexuals in the same given situations. In Study 1, LGBs’ levels of perceived discrimination in non-discriminatory situations (those where no actual discrimination took place) were compared with the responses of heterosexuals. In addition, Study 1 also examined which psychological well-being related variables (internalized heterosexism (homophobia), marginalization, isolation, alienation, self-esteem, and satisfaction with life) contributed most to perceptions of discrimination. Five hundred and sixty adults (355 Korean, 205 Australian) participated in the study through an online survey. Major findings were: only the Australian LGBs but not the Korean LGBs showed significantly higher levels of perceived discrimination than did heterosexual counterparts. Using a priming stimulus did not increase the perception of discrimination; heterosexuals were more aware of others knowing their sexual orientation than LGBs. Alienation was the variable that most related to perceived discrimination. Study 1 had used only situations where no actual discrimination was included or intended. This study also showed that there were a number of differences between the Australian and Korean samples: Korean LGBs had significantly lower psychological well-being; and most of the Korean LGBs were in Stage 4 (acceptance) whereas the majority of Australian LGBs were in Stage 6 (synthesis). Further cross-cultural studies are needed. Study 2 examined the responses of perceived discrimination using an actual discriminatory scenario and a non-discriminatory scenario. It also examined the relationships between outness and perceived discrimination; and between previous experience of discrimination and perceived discrimination. Sixty six Australian university students (44 females, 21 males, and one gender unidentified) participated in this second study. Major findings were: significant differences were found in perceived discrimination between the nondiscriminatory and discriminatory scenario situations for all participants, between heterosexuals and LGBs, between lesbians and heterosexual women, but not between lesbian women and gay men. No correlation was found between outness and perceived discrimination in either the discriminatory or the non-discriminatory situations. However, previous experience of discrimination was correlated sharply with perceptions of discrimination in both scenarios.

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