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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Lines written in my closet volume one of Judith Sargent Murray's poetry manuscripts

Mills, Tammy. Murray, Judith Sargent 2006 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Georgia State University, 2006. Title from title screen. Reiner Smolinski, committee chair; Tanya Caldwell, Robert D. Sattelmeyer , committee members. Electronic text (440 p.) : digital, PDF file. Description based on contents viewed July 20, 2007. Includes bibliographical references (p. 116-120).
2

A laudable ambition fired her soul conduct fiction helps define republican womanhood, female communities, and women's education in the works of Judith Sargent Murray, Hannah Webster Foster, and Susanna Haswell Rowson

Workman, Jessica Crystal 1 December 2011 (has links)
This study examines the major works of Judith Sargent Murray, Hannah Webster Foster, and Susanna Haswell Rowson, three major writers of the 1790s whose writing responds to the ideologies of the early American Republic. I suggest that Murray, Foster, and Rowson write conduct fiction which responds to the changing attitudes toward women and education after the American Revolution. Using fiction, these authors comment on the republican woman, the need for women's education, and the necessity for women to gather in communities for support. Despite the prevailing notion that reading too many novels would corrupt young women, Judith Sargent Murray's novella, The Story of Margaretta (1786), Hannah Webster Foster's novels, The Coquette (1797) and The Boarding School (1798), and Susanna Rowson's novels, Charlotte Temple (1794) and Reuben and Rachel; or, Tales of Old Times (1798), were some of the most popular books in the late eighteenth century. If these novels were not meant to be read by young women, who were the authors' primary audience, why were they so popular? This project situates these questions in the political environment the authors were writing in to show that a relationship exists between what women were reading and how authors of conduct fiction helped facilitate the changing roles of women in the early Republic. ID: 030646201; System requirements: World Wide Web browser and PDF reader.; Mode of access: World Wide Web.; Thesis (M.A.)--University of Central Florida, 2011.; Includes bibliographical references (p. 101-108). M.A. Masters English Arts and Humanities English; Literary, Cultural and Textual Studies Track

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