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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Implications of writing about philosophy of life for health and mood /

Eells, Jennifer Emilia, January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2003. / Typescript. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 59-63). Also available on the Internet.
2

Implications of writing about philosophy of life for health and mood

Eells, Jennifer Emilia, January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2003. / Typescript. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 59-63). Also available on the Internet.
3

Where We Belong: A Memoir

Merrill, Mark Reed 24 April 2012 (has links)
Where We Belong is more than a memoir. It is a love story about the untimely death of the oldest of five daughters born to a prominent New Haven, Connecticut family. It is also a tale of hubris, rage and frustration, a Greek tragedy about a man's life as re-examined through the lens of the two weeks his wife spent dying, a tale in which chronic illness and good intentions ensure the death of a loving wife, artist and mother. The journey on which her husband takes the reader explores a health care system oblivious to her plight, her family's unwitting complicity and a 12-step mythology that unfolds while he, her six weeping children and her aging mother helplessly look on. The author endures an agony that dwarfs incentives to lie, learning that people lie out of fear, and genuine grief supplants fear with the stark reality of what we fear most: death. Where We Belong gives voice to the internal dialogue the author encounters when reexamining not just memories, but the accoutrements of memory, as well. It is a voice that addresses his own grandiosity, sentimentalism and self-pity in the face of his wife's death, in addition to those details, circumstances and impressions that speak to the arrogance he brought to the task of being all he thought she and her six children needed him to be. He concludes the task was well beyond him, a realization evoked by the gut wrenching decision to literally "pull the plug" on this heartbreaking tale of reconstituted hope and great promise reduced to rubble by chronic illness, alcoholism, drug addiction and death. Born is the lesson that when we grieve, we are free to be ourselves. When we are free to be ourselves, we are free to love again.
4

Personal narratives of newly qualified nurses in a public hospital in Gauteng province

Mqokozo, Nontutuzelo Joyce 27 March 2014 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to explore the work-related experiences of the newly qualified nurses and their views about their own performance adequacy, in clinical area in a Public Hospital in Gauteng Province during their first year of clinical professional practice. The objectives of this study were to explore the work-related experiences of the NQNs and their views about their own performance adequacy in clinical practice during their first year of clinical professional practice, and to describe the work-related experiences of the NQNs and their performance adequacy in the clinical area during their first year of clinical professional practice. An exploratory, descriptive and interpretative qualitative research was selected using a narrative approach to data collection. Benner‟s model of novice to expert guided the research. The research was conducted with thirteen newly qualified professional nurses. NQNs, who trained in the nursing college that is associated with the selected hospital, and who were in their first year as professional nurses, were consciously and purposefully selected using the snowballing method. Ethical considerations were maintained throughout the study. In line with the story theme, Owen (1984)‟s model of data analysis was used. Five major themes and five sub-themes emerged from the data. Two levels of analysis were used in developing meaning from the narratives. The results revealed that transitioning from student nurse to becoming a newly qualified nurse is challenging, shocking and humiliating.
5

Feminist Narratives of Sport: a second- and third- wave consciousness-raising project

Barnes, Sarah 05 May 2010 (has links)
In Canada there are increasing numbers of girls and women playing sport (Ifedi, 2005). In part, these opportunities are the result of earlier feminist efforts in the 1970s and 1980s and yet feminism itself is very rarely a part of the experiences of girls and women once they are involved in sport. The purpose of this thesis is to explore how this might be different and to create feminist politics around women’s high performance sport in Canada. This consciousness-raising qualitative writing project features three narratives written from a first-person perspective based on my experiences playing interuniversity sport. Chapters on methodology, second- and third-wave feminism and Canadian sport history provide a context for the narratives chapter. I urge other athletes to take up feminisms so that they might gain a different perspective to understand their experiences and see greater connections between themselves and other women. This might inspire women to change what they expect from and how they evaluate their experiences in sport in ways that align with feminist ideas. The project concludes with some thoughts on doing a qualitative writing project that might be helpful to other graduate students who are considering doing this type of research. / Thesis (Master, Kinesiology & Health Studies) -- Queen's University, 2010-05-04 23:43:53.475
6

What we are given /

Smith, Andrew L., January 1997 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 1997. / Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 68-70). Also available on the Internet.
7

What we are given

Smith, Andrew L., January 1997 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 1997. / Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 68-70). Also available on the Internet.
8

Performing our pasts : representing history, representing self /

Hermer, Carol A. January 1998 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 1998. / Vita. Includes bibliographic references (leaves [191]-199).
9

Personal narratives of nationalism in Turkey

Uzun, Emel January 2016 (has links)
The Kurdish Question, which dates back to the Ottoman Era, has been a constituent element of narratives of Turkish nationalism for the past 30 years. The Kurdish Question stands as the most prominent “other” of Turkish nationalism. The members of two groups, Kurds and Turks, became highly politicised throughout 30 years of internal conflict and through their daily encounters, giving way to a constant redefinition of the understanding of nationalism and ethnicity. The encounters and experiences of these two groups have facilitated the development of various narrative forms of personal nationalism in daily life. Accordingly, the daily manifestations of the Kurdish Question and Turkish nationalism have grown as an object of academic interest. The question of how ordinary people produce – and are produced in – personal narratives of nationalism is a subject that still needs to be addressed, and this thesis aims to fill this gap by examining the notion of “personal narratives”. Analysing nationalism through personal narratives enables us to see how hegemonic nationalist ideology is reproduced and practiced by individuals through various dynamics. The thesis finds that the determining theme in the personal narratives of Turks and Kurds follows fundamentally the official ideology of the state about the Kurds, which is based principally on „a strategy of denial‟. The macro political transformations of the 2000s and the increased potential of encountering the “other” in daily life underline the challenging nature of this ideological strategy of denial. Herein, while the Turkish participants define themselves as the benevolent party in their nationalist narratives, they mark Kurdish people as terrorists, separatists and primitives. In contrast, the narratives of the Kurdish participants are characterised by the adoption of a “self-defence” strategy against the dominant negative perceptions of Turkish society about their culture: they assert that they are in fact not ignorant; not terrorists; not disloyal citizens, and so on. The narratives of the Turkish participants about the ethnic “other”, the Kurds, generally follow a strategy of contempt and accusation; yet personal experiences give them the opportunity to politicise the problem on different grounds by empathising or humanising. On the Kurdish side, the subjects of the personal narratives are more often the state and the army than Turkish individuals, and again they construct a narrative that endeavours to reverse the dominant negative perceptions about Kurds. They attempt to negate the denial strategy through both collective and personal stories of the discrimination they have experienced over the years and generations. Vital questions such as through which mechanisms of resistance do ordinary people construct and practice their ethnic identities, again become visible through their personal narratives.
10

Stand together or fall alone : narratives from former teachers

Wennås Brante, Eva January 2012 (has links)
In 2004 as many as 25% of teachers in Sweden, Denmark, and England were willing to leave their profession immediately; in the United States much effort has been invested in studying why teachers leave the profession. In this paper, four teachers who left the profession were interviewed from within the life-story tradition. In the narratives, which were rendered in a poetic style during the analysis, colleagues were mentioned both positively and negatively. The theme of having colleagues, and especially trust or mistrust between colleagues, was thus explored. The existence or non-existence of lateral trust between teachers can be connected both to school development and to student learning outcomes.

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