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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

You bet your life...and mine! Contemporary Samoan gambling in New Zealand

Perese, Lana January 2009 (has links)
Pacific peoples in New Zealand are identified as having the highest risk and prevalence of problem and pathological gambling behaviours. Despite increasing awareness of gambling related harms in New Zealand there is a dearth of research on Pacific gambling, the reasons for problem gambling and the risks gambling poses for these populations. This thesis examines contemporary Samoan gambling and problem gambling through the perceptions and in-depth understandings of thirty-two Samoan participants. Pacific research methodologies premised on Pacific epistemologies, practices and protocols provide the cultural framework that supports the qualitative methods used in this research. These cultural methodologies also provide the context within which data gathered is analysed, interpreted and discussed. The method used within this thesis is an amalgam of Pacific and grounded theory approaches. The research identifies Samoan cultural factors that play a major role in understanding contemporary Samoan gambling. It links the deep-rooted cultural understandings of va/teu le va that are associated with early Samoan games and sports with contemporary Samoan gambling behaviours and practices. The research provides cultural understandings of the complex conditions and processes within which contemporary Samoan gambling and problem gambling are embedded, constituted and differentiated for Samoan people in New Zealand. These understandings are used to explore the extent to which gambling impacts harm Samoan individuals, families and communities. The research also describes cultural factors that are associated with motivations for contemporary Samoan gambling. It demonstrates that concepts such as ‘winning’, ‘fundraising’ and ‘socialising’ act as primary motivations for engagement and explores ways in which these drivers challenge the va and teu le va that are inherent within fa’aSamoa. The potency of these new motivations is illustrated through consideration of cultural practices such as fa’alavelave, status acquisition, religion and hospitality. These factors are not only complex but they also play an important role in the initiation, development and maintenance of Samoan gambling. This thesis articulates a broad knowledge base of cultural factors, practices, influences and understandings that are associated with contemporary Samoan gambling in New Zealand. It highlights how Samoan (problem) gambling while often rationalised in terms of aiga enhancing precepts is in reality most often undermining and eroding of aiga values and practices. In light of these findings, contextually effective Samoan solutions incorporated into Public Health interventions are recommended as a means of addressing the alarming gambling-related issues facing Samoan people in New Zealand. A greater emphasis on aiga/familial interventions rather than focusing on individuals is crucial since aiga and close social networks are identified as playing an important role in the development and maintenance of gambling behaviour and can also be effective catalysts and supports for behavioural change. Further research is indicated to better understand and develop the knowledge-base on contemporary Samoan gambling with specific relevance to Samoan youth and adult populations in New Zealand. / Whole document restricted, but available by request to UoA members, use the feedback form to request access.
12

Gambling safety net : Predicting the risk of problem gambling using Bayesian networks / Ett skyddsnät för onlinekasino : Att predicera risken för spelproblem med hjälp av Bayesianska nätverk

Sikiric, Kristian January 2020 (has links)
As online casino and betting increases in popularity across the globe, the importance of green gambling has become an important subject of discussion. The Swedish betting company, ATG, realises the benefits of this and would like to prevent their gamblers from falling into problem gambling. To predict problem gambling, Bayesian networks were trained on previously identified problem gamblers, separated into seven risk groups. The network was then able to predict the risk group of previously unseen gamblers with an ac- curacy of 94%. It also achieved an average precision of 89%, an average recall of 96% and an average f1-score of 93%. The features in the data set were also ranked, to find which were most important in predicting problem gambling. It was found that municipality, which day of the week the transaction was made and during which hour of the day were the most important features. Also, the Bayesian network was also made as simple as possible, by removing irrelevant features and features which carry very low importance.
13

Intention to employ behavioral tactics to moderate gambling: Effects of gambling history and imagined mood

Lang, Brent Alan 07 August 2019 (has links)
No description available.
14

Gambling by Ontario Casino Employees: Gambling Behaviours, Problem Gambling, and Impacts of the Employment

Guttentag, Daniel January 2010 (has links)
This study investigated various aspects of the gambling engaged in by Ontario casino employees. Five casinos participated in the study, which involved a survey sample of 934 employees and an interview sample of 21 employees. The study found that the casino employees exhibited rates of problem gambling that were over three times greater than rates that past studies have found in Ontario’s general population. The employees’ problem gambling was primarily explained by employees who increased their gambling after beginning their jobs and employees who were attracted to their jobs because of prior gambling involvement, although neither of these characteristics was especially common overall. The increases and decreases in gambling that some employees experienced after beginning their jobs were precipitated by a variety of workplace influences associated with the employees’ exposure to gambling; their exposure to patrons; their exposure to the casino work environment; and the existence of training, regulations, and resources. The prevalence of problem gambling and other behavioural gambling patterns also were found to relate to numerous employment variables, such as department and shift. Based on all of these results, various policy recommendations and suggestions for future research are provided.
15

Gambling and gender : A public health perspective

Svensson, Jessika January 2013 (has links)
Prevalence studies around the world show that men are the largest group at risk of becoming problem gamblers and that men gamble more than women. However, gambling research has long been gender blind. The gambling market is rapidly changing, with the Internet making gambling more accessible. Further, despite the well-documented presence of health, social and financial problems among the concerned significant others (CSOs) of someone close with gambling problems in clinical and help-seeking samples, there is little research investigating on this population. This thesis aims to examine the relation between gender and problem gambling among regular gamblers and CSOs, and to determine whether there was a convergence of men’s and women’s gambling behavior between 1997/98 and 2009/10 in Sweden. A further aim is to examine health problems associated with Internet gambling and CSOs. The data collections were taken from three different but linked gambling and health representative national population based studies in Sweden, all using the same methods: telephone interviews supplemented by questionnaires. The studies are as follows: 1) prevalence study 1997/98, age 15-74 years, n = 10,000, response rate 72% (n = 7,139) 2) prevalence study 2008/09, age 16-84 years, n = 15,000, response rate 63% (n = 8,165); and 3) incident study 2009/10, the 8,165 participants from the 2008/09 prevalence study were contacted again, response rate 74% (n = 6,021). Gambling was generally merged into domains based on the axis chance-strategy and public-domestic. The dichotomy of public and private spheres is relevant in since there is a link between the public sphere and notions of masculinity and a link between the private and femininity. Further, the literature suggests that men are attracted to gambling that involves features of strategy, whereas women generally prefer game of chance. Problem gambling was measured using SOGS-R and PGSI. Health variables included measures such as self-reported health, psychological stress, social support, alcohol consumption, and financial situation as a determinant of health. There were very few indications of a convergence between men’s and women’s gambling behavior. Men and women generally gambled in different domains. Men gambled more than women and dominated all domains except the domain of chance-domestic, a domain associated with less risk and Internet gambling. However, men and women who gambled regularly were just as likely to be problem gamblers. No gender differences were found in the score from separate PGSI analyses in the chance-public domain (games of chance in public spaces, such as gambling machines and bingo in halls). This domain was also the only domain associated with problem gambling for women who gambled regularly. Men and women were just as likely to report that they were CSOs and they constituted a large proportion of the Swedish population (18%). CSOs experienced a range of social, economic and health related problems including psychological stress, risky alcohol consumption, exposure to violence, and separations. For women who were CSOs, no relation with own problem gambling was found. This thesis suggests that the presence of gambling machines must be addressed to prevent problem gambling and that separate analyses for men and women are required to identify important differences between genders. The findings indicate that gambling domains produce and reinforce gender. Further, to be able to prevent problem gambling we require further knowledge about these gendered processes. However, it is also important to see the overall similarities between men and women to avoid reinforcing stereotypical images of gender which would have an negative impact on the preventive work. Male and female gamblers are both very heterogeneous categories where the specific gambling site, context and life circumstances must be acknowledged. Prevention, research and interventions should also target CSOs if a public health approach is applied because they require help and support in their own right. CSOs also play an important to the problem gambler. More qualitative research is required to understand gendered processes in gambling, as well as further research on interventions that go beyond the individual and address gambling and problem gambling at various levels. When addressing the harmful effects of gambling from a public health perspective, it is imperative to recognize the ethical principles of justice, autonomy, doing no harm and beneficence. / -
16

The Roles of Religious Affiliation and Family Solidarity as Protective Factors against Problem Gambling Risk in a Métis Sample

Koorn, Keehan 14 September 2011 (has links)
Protective factors against problem gambling are important to study, and this thesis focuses on religious affiliation and family solidarity. In this study, 100 Métis Ontarians aged 46-88 completed a cross-sectional survey. The relationships of problem gambling risk with alcohol misuse, age, gender, religious affiliation, and family solidarity were explored. Intergenerational religious concordance (passing down religious affiliation through generations) was examined in the context of healthy family functioning. A qualitative research question asked participants about the potential relationship between religious beliefs and gambling behaviour. Participants at moderate or high risk of problem gambling (score of two or more on the Problem Gambling Severity Index) were more likely than those at no or low risk to say that they perceive a relationship between their gambling behaviour and their religious beliefs. / Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Ontario Problem Gambling Research Centre
17

Assessing Problem Gambling and Co-Occurring Substance Use and Criminal Activity among Drug Court Clients

Zorland, Jennifer L. 01 December 2009 (has links)
Research has demonstrated that problem gambling is associated with substance and alcohol abuse (Petry, Stinson, & Grant, 2005), participation in criminal activities (McCorkle, 2002; Meyer & Stadler, 1999), and involvement in the criminal justice system (NORC, 1999). This study assessed problem gambling and its relation to crime and substance use within a population in which these risk factors are compounded: Adults mandated to participate in drug and DUI courts. Results indicate that the prevalence and severity of problem gambling may be higher within this population than any other. Furthermore, the results of qualitative and quantitative analyses converged to highlight that gambling, crime and substance use are interrelated behaviors, as each may lead to and/or reinforce the other. These findings suggest that problem gambling is a salient issue among substance-abusing offenders and that resources should be dedicated to screening those involved with the criminal justice system for problem gambling, establishing evidence based best practices in the prevention and treatment of problem gambling within this population, and that such practices may incorporate components addressing gambling, crime, and substance use.
18

Assessing Problem Gambling and Co-Occurring Substance Use and Criminal Activity among Drug Court Clients

Zorland, Jennifer Lee 11 September 2009 (has links)
Research has demonstrated that problem gambling is associated with substance and alcohol abuse (Petry, Stinson, & Grant, 2005), participation in criminal activities (McCorkle, 2002; Meyer & Stadler, 1999), and involvement in the criminal justice system (NORC, 1999). This study assessed problem gambling and its relation to crime and substance use within a population in which these risk factors are compounded: Adults mandated to participate in drug and DUI courts. Results indicate that the prevalence and severity of problem gambling may be higher within this population than any other. Furthermore, the results of qualitative and quantitative analyses converged to highlight that gambling, crime and substance use are interrelated behaviors, as each may lead to and/or reinforce the other. These findings suggest that problem gambling is a salient issue among substance-abusing offenders and that resources should be dedicated to screening those involved with the criminal justice system for problem gambling, establishing evidence based best practices in the prevention and treatment of problem gambling within this population, and that such practices may incorporate components addressing gambling, crime, and substance use.
19

Assessing Problem Gambling and Co-Occurring Substance Use and Criminal Activity among Drug Court Clients

Zorland, Jennifer L. 01 December 2009 (has links)
Research has demonstrated that problem gambling is associated with substance and alcohol abuse (Petry, Stinson, & Grant, 2005), participation in criminal activities (McCorkle, 2002; Meyer & Stadler, 1999), and involvement in the criminal justice system (NORC, 1999). This study assessed problem gambling and its relation to crime and substance use within a population in which these risk factors are compounded: Adults mandated to participate in drug and DUI courts. Results indicate that the prevalence and severity of problem gambling may be higher within this population than any other. Furthermore, the results of qualitative and quantitative analyses converged to highlight that gambling, crime and substance use are interrelated behaviors, as each may lead to and/or reinforce the other. These findings suggest that problem gambling is a salient issue among substance-abusing offenders and that resources should be dedicated to screening those involved with the criminal justice system for problem gambling, establishing evidence based best practices in the prevention and treatment of problem gambling within this population, and that such practices may incorporate components addressing gambling, crime, and substance use.
20

Gambling Behaviors among Youth Involved in Juvenile and Family Courts

Mooss, Angela Devi 01 December 2009 (has links)
Problem gambling currently affects between 5-7% of youth ages 12-18 (Hardooon & Derevensky, 2002); however, rates of problem gambling among youth who are involved with the Juvenile Justice System are more than twice that of school sample rates (Lieberman & Cuadrado, 2002). Furthermore, disordered gambling often co-occurs with substance use and criminal activity (Huang & Boyer, 2007), issues that are compounded in the Juvenile Justice population. The current study assessed gambling behaviors and risk factors of 145 youth involved in juvenile, juvenile drug, and family courts. Results indicated that nearly 13% of these youth are currently problem gamblers, and that males and African-Americans had higher problem gambling rates than female and Caucasian youth. Furthermore, gambling-related crime, substance use, scope of gambling activities, and time in detention facilities were all predictive of problem gambling severity, while suicidal ideation, urban environment, and lottery sales per capita were not. Finally, having a parent with a gambling problem also emerged as a risk factor;however, the risk was greater for males than for females. These results present a distinct need for youth to be screened for gambling problems upon entering and exiting the Juvenile Justice System, and for prevention and intervention services to be offered within juvenile and family court settings. Furthermore, communities need to take an active role in preventing youth gambling problems through increasing public awareness and insuring that appropriate and accurate messages reflecting gambling opportunities and outcomes are presented.

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