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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

An exploration of community attitudes to recycled water use :

Hurlimann, Anna. Unknown Date (has links)
The use of recycled water has been promoted by policy in many parts of the world under the banner of sustainable water management. Impetus for these policies has been provided by increasing water scarcity driven by population growth and rising per capita water consumption. A major barrier to the success of recycled water use policies can be a lack of community support. A further problem is significant gaps, uncertainties and assumptions in the literature about community attitudes to recycled water use. The aim of this thesis was to bridge these gaps answering the specific research question: What are the components of community attitudes to and satisfaction with recycled water use? This was investigated through an urban Australian case study. / The gaps in literature required a theory building rather than theory testing approach to the research which was facilitated through the case study. Due to the sparse literature and few existing case studies, a broad range of parallel literatures from many disciplines were drawn upon to inform the research. The research structure of the thesis drew 56 observations from the combined literature and case studies. The observations informed the development of 5 broad Research Propositions, which translated into 60 specific Research Hypotheses that were tested with multiple methods including: conjoint analysis, contingent valuation, structural equation modelling and unobtrusive methods. The principal research tool was a panel / repeat cross sectional community survey. Three surveys of the community were undertaken, two prior to the use of recycled water commencing (both with 136 respondents), and the third post recycled water use commencing (with 162 respondents). / The case study site for the research was Mawson Lakes in South Australia, where recycled water is used for non-potable purposes, including garden watering, toilet flushing and car washing, through a dual water supply system. Construction of this Greenfields suburb began in 1997 and is expected to be completed in 2010 by which time there will be 10,000 residents. Recycled water began reticulation through the dual water supply system in April 2005; until that time potable water was delivered through the recycled water pipes. / In answer to the research question, the study found the components of community satisfaction with recycled water use were an individual's positive perception of: - the Water Authority's communication, - trust in the Water Authority, - fairness in the recycled water system's implementation, - quality of the recycled water, - financial value of the recycled water system, and - risk associated with recycled water use (negative relationship) / Other issues investigated in the thesis include: attitudes to recycled water attributes including salt, colour, odour and price (when used for clothes washing, garden watering and toilet flushing), risk perception, attitudes to price, willingness to pay for recycled water quality improvements, willingness to pay for non-market benefits of recycled water use, perceptions of institutions, and other related attitudes. / Results of this investigation contribute to building knowledge and understanding of community attitudes to recycled water use, and hence facilitate sustainable management of water resources. / Thesis (PhDBusinessandManagement)--University of South Australia, 2006.
2

The feasibility of utilizing grey water in Hong Kong buildings /

Leung, Suet-fai. January 2002 (has links)
Thesis (M. Sc.)--University of Hong Kong, 2002. / Includes bibliographical references.
3

Adaptive reuse of abandoned historic churches: building type and public perception

Ahn, You Kyong 15 May 2009 (has links)
This study investigates the adaptive reuse of abandoned historic churches. Since churches serve as cultural heritage symbols, the public becomes concerned with maintaining the historic integrity of these buildings. More so, this phenomenon is accentuated when the church is recognized as a historic building by the National Register of Historic Places. Yet, more and more churches are abandoned due to decreases in congregation size and financial constraints that limit the maintenance of the churches. Adaptive reuse projects of these abandoned churches are often initiated to save and preserve these buildings. This research focuses on the question: What is the public perception of critical architectural features of a historic church when it is adapted to a new function (new building type)? To support the importance of this question, the study integrates two major bodies of knowledge. The first body of literature is research conducted in cognitive science focusing on human perception of environments. The second body of literature is on historic preservation with a focus on adaptive reuse. The integration of these literature reviews is further demonstrated in the analysis of examples of past and recent adaptive reuse projects of religious buildings. Following this investigation, a conceptual model was developed to illustrate how research variables and hypotheses were made based on the findings from this literature review. To test the research question and its hypotheses, two prototypes of historic churches were developed. Then, typologies of changes in the important architectural features (interior volume and light quality) of the churches were constructed from examples of adaptively reused historic churches listed in the National Register of Historic Places. These typologies were developed to represent various building types (e.g., community/ cultural, institutional, commercial, and residential). Finally, an experiment was conducted to test public perceptions of acceptable and desirable degree of each reuse and the degree of retaining religious origins by use of these typologies. The findings of this research illustrate the importance of public perception and building type in adaptive reuse projects. This in turn provides theoretical and practical implications for adaptive reuse projects in the field of historic preservation.
4

Adaptive reuse of abandoned historic churches: building type and public perception

Ahn, You Kyong 15 May 2009 (has links)
This study investigates the adaptive reuse of abandoned historic churches. Since churches serve as cultural heritage symbols, the public becomes concerned with maintaining the historic integrity of these buildings. More so, this phenomenon is accentuated when the church is recognized as a historic building by the National Register of Historic Places. Yet, more and more churches are abandoned due to decreases in congregation size and financial constraints that limit the maintenance of the churches. Adaptive reuse projects of these abandoned churches are often initiated to save and preserve these buildings. This research focuses on the question: What is the public perception of critical architectural features of a historic church when it is adapted to a new function (new building type)? To support the importance of this question, the study integrates two major bodies of knowledge. The first body of literature is research conducted in cognitive science focusing on human perception of environments. The second body of literature is on historic preservation with a focus on adaptive reuse. The integration of these literature reviews is further demonstrated in the analysis of examples of past and recent adaptive reuse projects of religious buildings. Following this investigation, a conceptual model was developed to illustrate how research variables and hypotheses were made based on the findings from this literature review. To test the research question and its hypotheses, two prototypes of historic churches were developed. Then, typologies of changes in the important architectural features (interior volume and light quality) of the churches were constructed from examples of adaptively reused historic churches listed in the National Register of Historic Places. These typologies were developed to represent various building types (e.g., community/ cultural, institutional, commercial, and residential). Finally, an experiment was conducted to test public perceptions of acceptable and desirable degree of each reuse and the degree of retaining religious origins by use of these typologies. The findings of this research illustrate the importance of public perception and building type in adaptive reuse projects. This in turn provides theoretical and practical implications for adaptive reuse projects in the field of historic preservation.
5

Small scale determination of alpha in a fine bubble diffuser system

Doyle, Michael L. January 1981 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1981. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 135-141).
6

Investigation of dynamic performance of wastewater treatment plants

Shih, Chun-yen, January 1976 (has links)
Thesis--Wisconsin. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 302-317).
7

Sensitivity analyses of wastewater treatment plant independent state variables and technological parameters

Voelkel, Karl Goodman. January 1978 (has links)
Thesis--Wisconsin. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 218-226).
8

Operational control strategies for final clarifiers, as determined from dynamic pilot plant continuous flow settling column studies

Wilson, Brian Douglas. January 1981 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1981. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 233-244).
9

Effect of the chemical constituents in water on oxygen transfer

Hantz, Patricia J. January 1980 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 90-96).
10

Simulation of diurnal operation of the fluidized bed system for wastewater treatment

Sigmund, Thomas Wayne. January 1982 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1982. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 97-101).

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