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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The application of electrostatic techniques to the analysis of pre-fracture phenomena in rocks

Itani, Fawzi Saadeddine, 1954- January 1978 (has links)
No description available.
2

Laboratory study of stick-slip friction

Illfelder, Herbert Max Joseph. January 1979 (has links)
Thesis--University of Wisconsin--Madison. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 75-77).
3

An examination of failure criteria for some common rocks in Hong Kong /

Lock, Yick-bun. January 1996 (has links)
Thesis (M. Phil.)--University of Hong Kong, 1996. / Includes bibliographical references (leaf 207-212).
4

Project report on direct shear tests for rock joints

Cheng, Pei-fen, Caral, 鄭佩芬 January 2002 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Applied Geosciences / Master / Master of Science
5

Complete stress-strain behavior for shear failure of rocks

Zhou, Guolin, 周國林 January 1999 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Civil Engineering / Doctoral / Doctor of Philosophy
6

Three-dimensional geometrical analysis of rock mass structure

Ikegawa, Yojiro January 1992 (has links)
No description available.
7

The elastic properties of shales

Hornby, Brian E. January 1994 (has links)
No description available.
8

PROBABILISTIC ANALYSIS OF FRACTURED ROCK MASSES.

SAVELY, JAMES PALMER. January 1987 (has links)
Stability analysis of rock masses composed of small, discrete rock blocks that are in-place and interlocked should consider four components of failure: (1) Sliding between blocks. (2) Shearing through rock blocks. (3) Rolling blocks in a shear zone. (4) Crushing of rock blocks. Statistical rock mass description is used to define the characteristics of the rock blocks and the block assemblage. Clastic mechanics is one method of predicting stresses produced by the arrangement of rock blocks and the loading conditions. Failure begins at a point of maximum stress behind the slope. Progression of the failure is assumed if the first block fails because adjacent blocks will become overstressed. The location of the point of maximum stress is determined from the shape and arrangement of the constituent rock blocks. Because strength is mobilized block-by-block rather than instantaneously along a continuous shear surface, sliding between blocks shows less stability than a soil rotational shear analysis or a rigid block sliding analysis. Shearing through rock blocks occurs when maximum shear stress exceeds rock shear strength. Crushing of rock blocks is predicted if the normal stress exceeds the compressive strength of the rock block. A size-strength relationship is combined with the rock block size distribution curve to estimate crushing strength. Rotating blocks in a shear zone have been observed in model studies and as a mechanism in landslides. Stability analysis assumes that the rock mass is sufficiently loosened by blasting and excavation to allow blocks to rotate. The shear strength of rolling blocks is dynamic shear strength that is less than static sliding shear strength. This rolling mechanism can explain release of slope failures where there are no other obvious structural controls. Stability of each component of rock mass failure is calculated separately using capacity-demand reliability. These results are combined as a series-connected system to give the overall stability of the rock mass. This probability of failure for the rock mass system explicitly accounts for the four components of rock mass failure. Criteria for recognizing rock mass failure potential and examples applying the proposed method are presented.
9

ROCKBOLT ANALYSIS FOR REINFORCEMENT AND DESIGN IN LAYERED ROCK (COMPOSITE).

JEFFREY, ROBERT GRAHAM, JR. January 1985 (has links)
The displacements and stresses in layered rock above underground openings can be calculated using a beam model for the rock layers. The traditional approach assumes that interfaces between layers are frictionless and layers can slip past one another freely as they deflect. In contrast, the design of structural laminated beams has traditionally been based on the assumption that the interfaces between layers were welded, with no slip occurring there. In this work, the theory of composite laminated beams, which allows for partial slip on layer interfaces, is applied to the problem of predicting displacements and stresses in layered roof rock. The effects of rockbolt reinforcement are modeled by discrete shear and normal stiffnesses incorporated at locations in the model where the rockbolts cross layer interfaces. Published solutions and results for laminated composite beams are reviewed. Composite laminated beam theory provided a means of accounting for rockbolt reinforcement effects and provided a conceptual framework that was used to develop two FORTRAN programs; one, based on the force method of analysis, that automatically finds shear and tensile interface failures in the system, and the other a finite element program that employs beam elements, elastic interface elements, and rockbolt elements to model a rockbolted layered rock system. Published data together with results from these programs suggest that shear reinforcement may be more effective when placed near the ends of roof layers. The normal interaction between layers tends to be uniformly distributed unless rockbolt forces act on the layers or if partial delamination of layers has occurred. Both shear and normal reinforcement will cause stresses to be redistributed within the system of layers. Analysis of this redistribution of stresses requires that the sequence of interface failure be predicted which, in turn, requires that the properties of the individual layers, of the interfaces between layers, and of the rockbolts be properly taken into account. Laminated composite beam theory and programs based on this theory provide rational and efficient ways to study and analyze the behavior of layered roof rock.
10

DESIGN OF TUNNELS IN ROCK USING STRAIN ENERGY AND LIMIT STATE CONCEPTS.

Finley, Ray Edward, 1956- January 1986 (has links)
No description available.

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