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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Behavioral and demographic characteristics of northern sea lion rookeries /

Merrick, Richard L. January 1987 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Oregon State University, 1988. / Typescript (photocopy). Includes bibliographical references (leaves 90-96). Also available via the World Wide Web.
2

Behaviour of lactating Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) during the breeding season : a comparison between a declining and stable population in Alaska /

Milette, Linda Leontine. January 1999 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of British Columbia, 1999. / "July 1999." Includes bibliographical references (leaves 49-55). Also available via the World Wide Web; file in PDF format.
3

Investigating the use of blubber fatty acids to detect Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) foraging on ephemeral high-quality prey /

Hoberecht, Laura K. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 2006. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 233-247).
4

Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) of Oregon and Northern California : seasonal haulout abundance patterns, movements of marked juveniles, and effects of hot-iron branding on apparent survival of pups at Rogue Reef /

Scordino, Jonathan. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Oregon State University, 2007. / Printout. Includes bibliographical references. Also available on the World Wide Web.
5

A multistate mark recapture analysis to estimate reproductive rate in the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus), an endangered species

Taylor, Rebecca Lynn. January 2009 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (PhD)--Montana State University--Bozeman, 2009. / Typescript. Chairperson, Graduate Committee: Daniel Goodman. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 104-112).
6

Stranding Mortality Patterns in California Sea Lions and Steller Sea Lions in Oregon and Southern Washington, 2006 to 2014

Lee, Kessina 02 June 2016 (has links)
As changing ocean conditions lead to declining fish stocks and movement of forage fish, sea lions on the Oregon coast are subject to the pressures of declining prey availability and increasing conflicts with commercial and recreational fisheries. An analysis of strandings of California sea lions, Zalophus californianus, and Steller sea lions, Eumetopias jubatus, from 2006 to 2014, included cause of death, changing ocean conditions, and anthropogenic activity. Causes of death included disease, injury, and human interaction, such as gunshot wounds, fisheries net entanglements and boat strikes. Oregon and Washington strandings of California sea lions are primarily adult and subadult males that migrate north from California rookeries, while Steller sea lions are year-round residents and strandings are comprised of males and females of all ages. While the California sea lion population is currently at or near carrying capacity, the Eastern Pacific population of Steller sea lions was designated as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act until October 2013. Understanding impacts to these two pinniped species is vital to implementing effective management and conservation policies. Oregon and southern Washington strandings of California sea lions and Steller sea lions from 2006 to 2014 were analyzed spatially using the geographic information system (GIS), and temporally to identify possible correlations with prey availability and human interaction. Strandings were found to follow seasonal patterns from year to year: Steller sea lion strandings were highest from May to July, California sea lions peaked in September, October, and November. There was a correlation between significantly high numbers of strandings and the three largest commercial fisheries in Oregon: Chinook salmon, Coho salmon, and Dungeness crab. This analysis provides a format for continuing to monitor primary ecological and anthropogenic drivers of pinniped mortality in Oregon and southern Washington.
7

The evolution of a physiological system: the pulmonary surfactant system in diving mammals.

Miller, Natalie J January 2005 (has links)
Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins that lowers surface tension, increases lung compliance, and prevents the adhesion of respiratory surfaces and pulmonary oedema. Pressure can have an enormous impact on respiratory function, by mechanically compressing tissues, increasing gas tension resulting in increased gas absorption and by increasing dissolved gas tensions during diving, resulting in the formation of bubbles in the blood and tissues. The lungs of diving mammals have a huge range of morphological adaptations to enable them to endure the extremely high pressures associated with deep diving. Here, I hypothesise that surfactant will also be modified, to complement the morphological changes and enable more efficient lung function during diving. Molecular adaptations to diving were examined in surfactant protein C (SP-C) using phylogenetic analyses. The composition and function of pulmonary surfactant from several species of diving mammals was examined using biochemical assays, mass spectrometry and captive bubble surfactometry. The development of surfactant in one species of diving mammal (California sea lion), and the control of surfactant secretion using chemical and mechanical stimuli were also determined. Diving mammals showed modifications to SP-C, which are likely to lead to stronger binding to the monolayer, thereby increasing its fluidity. Phospholipid molecular species concentrations were altered to increase the concentration of more fluid species. There was also an increase in the percentage of alkyl molecular species, which may increase the stability of the monolayer during compression and facilitate rapid respreading. Levels of SP-B were much lower in the diving species, and cholesterol was inversely proportional to the maximum dive depth of the three species. Surface activity of surfactant from diving mammals was very poor compared to surfactant from terrestrial mammals. The newborn California sea lion surfactant was similar to terrestrial mammal surfactant, suggesting that these animals develop the diving-type of surfactant after they first enter the water. The isolated cells of California sea lions also showed a similar response to neuro-hormonal stimulation as terrestrial mammals, but were insensitive to pressure. These findings showed diving mammal surfactant to have a primarily anti-adhesive function that develops after the first entry into the water, with a surfactant monolayer, which would be better suited to repeated collapse and respreading. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, 2005.
8

Persistent organic pollutants in Stellar sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) / Persistent organic pollutants in Steller's sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus)

Hülck, Kathrin January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2007. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 110-136). / xvi, 177 leaves, bound ill., maps 29 cm
9

The evolution of a physiological system: the pulmonary surfactant system in diving mammals.

Miller, Natalie J January 2005 (has links)
Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins that lowers surface tension, increases lung compliance, and prevents the adhesion of respiratory surfaces and pulmonary oedema. Pressure can have an enormous impact on respiratory function, by mechanically compressing tissues, increasing gas tension resulting in increased gas absorption and by increasing dissolved gas tensions during diving, resulting in the formation of bubbles in the blood and tissues. The lungs of diving mammals have a huge range of morphological adaptations to enable them to endure the extremely high pressures associated with deep diving. Here, I hypothesise that surfactant will also be modified, to complement the morphological changes and enable more efficient lung function during diving. Molecular adaptations to diving were examined in surfactant protein C (SP-C) using phylogenetic analyses. The composition and function of pulmonary surfactant from several species of diving mammals was examined using biochemical assays, mass spectrometry and captive bubble surfactometry. The development of surfactant in one species of diving mammal (California sea lion), and the control of surfactant secretion using chemical and mechanical stimuli were also determined. Diving mammals showed modifications to SP-C, which are likely to lead to stronger binding to the monolayer, thereby increasing its fluidity. Phospholipid molecular species concentrations were altered to increase the concentration of more fluid species. There was also an increase in the percentage of alkyl molecular species, which may increase the stability of the monolayer during compression and facilitate rapid respreading. Levels of SP-B were much lower in the diving species, and cholesterol was inversely proportional to the maximum dive depth of the three species. Surface activity of surfactant from diving mammals was very poor compared to surfactant from terrestrial mammals. The newborn California sea lion surfactant was similar to terrestrial mammal surfactant, suggesting that these animals develop the diving-type of surfactant after they first enter the water. The isolated cells of California sea lions also showed a similar response to neuro-hormonal stimulation as terrestrial mammals, but were insensitive to pressure. These findings showed diving mammal surfactant to have a primarily anti-adhesive function that develops after the first entry into the water, with a surfactant monolayer, which would be better suited to repeated collapse and respreading. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, 2005.
10

Operation Sea Lion German plans for the invasion of England, 1939-1942.

Wheatley, Ronald. January 1958 (has links)
Thesis (B. LITT.)--Oxford. / Without thesis statement. Bibliography: p. 170-174.

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