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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Textual collisions: the writing process and the Modernist experiment

Hollis, Erin Michelle 29 August 2005 (has links)
This dissertation explores textual junctures such as this in the compositional processes of James Joyce, Djuna Barnes, Mina Loy and Ezra Pound that illuminate how these modernists negotiated the fraught position of being an author in the early twentieth century. This approach marks a departure from conventional textual criticism as I look at the intersections between textual criticism and literary theory, demonstrating the effects different theories can have on our understanding of textual criticism. Recent innovations in textual scholarship influenced by poststructuralist theorists allow me to uncover and describe the extent to which each of these four authors construct a self-conscious version of authorship in relation to their larger Modernist aims. This examination reveals how Joyce, Barnes, Loy, and Pound were subject to numerous outside influences, personal insecurities and preoccupations throughout the writing process, indicating their desires to both manipulate and participate in the modernist project of innovation and experimentation. The first chapter addresses the evolution of Joyce??s pre-writing, drafting and revising processes as a form of textual gossip. Joyce excised material from much of his early writing, controlling his work as a gossiper controls rumors. As he becameincreasingly more inclusive in his writing process, he also reflected a more positive regard for gossip as a similarly inclusive process. The second chapter examines the revision and editing of Ryder, Nightwood, and The Antiphon. Barnes increasingly sought legitimacy for her work by subjecting it to the conventionalizing editing of T.S. Eliot and Emily Holmes Coleman. In the third chapter, I interrogate Pound??s poetic practices and his status as an expatriate in order to reveal how Pound felt as an exile to his own writing. The fourth chapter analyzes Loy??s marginal status in the modernist canon, arguing that she created a persona through her public presentation of herself in her poems that is responsible for her constant and perpetual rediscovery.
2

Textual collisions: the writing process and the Modernist experiment

Hollis, Erin Michelle 29 August 2005 (has links)
This dissertation explores textual junctures such as this in the compositional processes of James Joyce, Djuna Barnes, Mina Loy and Ezra Pound that illuminate how these modernists negotiated the fraught position of being an author in the early twentieth century. This approach marks a departure from conventional textual criticism as I look at the intersections between textual criticism and literary theory, demonstrating the effects different theories can have on our understanding of textual criticism. Recent innovations in textual scholarship influenced by poststructuralist theorists allow me to uncover and describe the extent to which each of these four authors construct a self-conscious version of authorship in relation to their larger Modernist aims. This examination reveals how Joyce, Barnes, Loy, and Pound were subject to numerous outside influences, personal insecurities and preoccupations throughout the writing process, indicating their desires to both manipulate and participate in the modernist project of innovation and experimentation. The first chapter addresses the evolution of Joyce??s pre-writing, drafting and revising processes as a form of textual gossip. Joyce excised material from much of his early writing, controlling his work as a gossiper controls rumors. As he becameincreasingly more inclusive in his writing process, he also reflected a more positive regard for gossip as a similarly inclusive process. The second chapter examines the revision and editing of Ryder, Nightwood, and The Antiphon. Barnes increasingly sought legitimacy for her work by subjecting it to the conventionalizing editing of T.S. Eliot and Emily Holmes Coleman. In the third chapter, I interrogate Pound??s poetic practices and his status as an expatriate in order to reveal how Pound felt as an exile to his own writing. The fourth chapter analyzes Loy??s marginal status in the modernist canon, arguing that she created a persona through her public presentation of herself in her poems that is responsible for her constant and perpetual rediscovery.
3

Paper Categorization Using Naive Bayes

Cui, Man 29 April 2013 (has links)
Literature survey is a time-consuming process as researchers spend a lot of time in searching the papers of interest. While search engines can be useful in finding papers that contain a certain set of keywords, one still has to go through these papers in order to decide whether they are of interest. On the other hand, one can quickly decide which papers are of interest if each one of them is labelled with a category. The process of labelling each paper with a category is termed paper categorization, an instance of a more general problem called text classification. In this thesis, we presented a text classifier called Iris that makes use of the popular Naive Bayes algorithm. With Iris, we were able to (1) evaluate Naive Bayes using a number of popular datasets, (2) propose a GUI for assisting users with document categorization and searching, and (3) demonstrate how the GUI can be utilized for paper categorization and searching. / Graduate / 0984
4

Cross-Lingual Text Categorization

Lin, Yen-Ting 29 July 2004 (has links)
With the emergence and proliferation of Internet services and e-commerce applications, a tremendous amount of information is accessible online, typically as textual documents. To facilitate subsequent access to and leverage from this information, the efficient and effective management¡Xspecifically, text categorization¡Xof the ever-increasing volume of textual documents is essential to organizations and person. Existing text categorization techniques focus mainly on categorizing monolingual documents. However, with the globalization of business environments and advances in Internet technology, an organization or person often retrieves and archives documents in different languages, thus creating the need for cross-lingual text categorization. Motivated by the significance of and need for such a cross-lingual text categorization technique, this thesis designs a technique with two different category assignment methods, namely, individual- and cluster-based. The empirical evaluation results show that the cross-lingual text categorization technique performs well and the cluster-based method outperforms the individual-based method.
5

Poly-Lingual Text Categorization

Shih, Hui-Hua 09 August 2006 (has links)
With the rapid emergence and proliferation of Internet and the trend of globalization, a tremendous number of textual documents written in different languages are electronically accessible online. Efficiently and effectively managing these textual documents written different languages is essential to organizations and individuals. Although poly-lingual text categorization (PLTC) can be approached as a set of independent monolingual classifiers, this naïve approach employs only the training documents of the same language to construct to construct a monolingual classifier and fails to utilize the opportunity offered by poly-lingual training documents. Motivated by the significance of and need for such a poly-lingual text categorization technique, we propose a PLTC technique that takes into account all training documents of all languages when constructing a monolingual classifier for a specific language. Using the independent monolingual text categorization (MnTC) technique as our performance benchmark, our empirical evaluation results show that our proposed PLTC technique achieves higher classification accuracy than the benchmark technique does in both English and Chinese corpora. In addition, our empirical results also suggest the robustness of the proposed PLTC technique with respect to the range of training sizes investigated.
6

Cross-Lingual Text Categorization: A Training-corpus Translation-based Approach

Hsu, Kai-hsiang 21 July 2005 (has links)
Text categorization deals with the automatic learning of a text categorization model from a training set of preclassified documents on the basis of their contents and the assignment of unclassified documents to appropriate categories. Most of existing text categorization techniques deal with monolingual documents (i.e., all documents are written in one language) during the text categorization model learning and category assignment (or prediction). However, with the globalization of business environments and advances in Internet technology, an organization or individual often generates/acquires and subsequently archives documents in different languages, thus creating the need for cross-lingual text categorization (CLTC). Existing studies on CLTC focus on the prediction-corpus translation-based approach that lacks of a systematic mechanism for reducing translation noises; thus, limiting their cross-lingual categorization effectiveness. Motivated by the needs of providing more effective CLTC support, we design a training-corpus translation-based CLTC approach. Using the prediction-corpus translation-based approach as the performance benchmark, our empirical evaluation results show that our proposed CLTC approach achieves significantly better classification effectiveness than the benchmark approach does in both Chinese
7

Indexing Compressed Text

He, Meng January 2003 (has links)
As a result of the rapid growth of the volume of electronic data, text compression and indexing techniques are receiving more and more attention. These two issues are usually treated as independent problems, but approaches of combining them have recently attracted the attention of researchers. In this thesis, we review and test some of the more effective and some of the more theoretically interesting techniques. Various compression and indexing techniques are presented, and we also present two compressed text indices. Based on these techniques, we implement an compressed full-text index, so that compressed texts can be indexed to support fast queries without decompressing the whole texts. The experiments show that our index is compact and supports fast search.
8

Indexing Compressed Text

He, Meng January 2003 (has links)
As a result of the rapid growth of the volume of electronic data, text compression and indexing techniques are receiving more and more attention. These two issues are usually treated as independent problems, but approaches of combining them have recently attracted the attention of researchers. In this thesis, we review and test some of the more effective and some of the more theoretically interesting techniques. Various compression and indexing techniques are presented, and we also present two compressed text indices. Based on these techniques, we implement an compressed full-text index, so that compressed texts can be indexed to support fast queries without decompressing the whole texts. The experiments show that our index is compact and supports fast search.
9

Wissenschaftliches Schreiben : Konzeption und Realisierung computerbasierter Trainingsaufgaben /

Proske, Antje. January 2007 (has links)
Techn. Universiẗat, Diss. u.d.T.: Proske, Antje: Entwicklung und Evaluation computerbasierter Trainingsaufgaben für das wissenschaftliche Schreiben--Dresden, 2006.
10

A Critical Edition of the Hexaplaric Fragments of Job 22-42

Meade, John D. 23 May 2012 (has links)
Primarily, this dissertation provides a critical text of the hexaplaric fragments of Job 22-42, which updates the previous editions of Field (1875) and Ziegler (1982), and which may serve as the fascicle for the second half of Job for The Hexapla Project. The critical text includes (1) extant readings of the Three, (2) Aristarchian signs' material, and (3) other materials usually related to the Hexapla. The project includes all relevant and available evidence from Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Syriac, and Armenian sources. Chapter 1 provides a summary of the history of the Hexapla and hexaplaric research. This chapter also presents the methodology for the project and an introduction to interpreting the apparatuses. Chapter 2 gives a full listing and description of the textual witnesses used for the project. These witnesses include the text groups of Ziegler's Edition, but, regarding the catena tradition of Job, this chapter provides an update to the status questionis by providing a brief history of the catena of Job in past hexaplaric editions and a new way forward. Chapter 3 provides the critical text. The Hebrew and Greek lemmas are listed first, followed by the hexaplaric attribution and lemma. All variants to the attribution and lemma are listed in the appartuses underneath along with editorial notes. Chapter 4 contains the readings that are of dubious significance for the Hexapla of Job. These readings are anonymous in the margins of manuscripts, which preserve hexaplaric readings and, therefore, they are included in this separate chapter. Chapter 5 gives a summary of the preliminary results of the project. This chapter focuses on those instances where Ziegler's Edition has been updated with regard to (1) new fragments and attributions, (2) revision of attribution and lemma, (3) revised attributions, (4) revised lemma, and (5) removed readings.

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