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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Enuresis the incidence of relapse following bell and pad conditioning, and the relationship of operant behaviors to improvement.

Avsar, Fatma Zehra, January 1972 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1972. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
2

A comparison of avoidance and classical conditioning in the treatment of nocturnal enuresis

Lynch, N. Timothy. January 1973 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1973. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
3

The effects of dry-bed training without the adjunct of an enuresis-alarm on the elimination of nocturnal enuresis in children /

Langeluddecke, Pauline Mary. January 1976 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (B.A.(Hons.))-- University of Adelaide, Dept. of Psychology, 1977.
4

The treatment of urinary incontinence : cost utility analysis and quality of life benefits /

Foote, Andrew John. January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (M. D.)--University of New South Wales, 2003. / Also available online.
5

Living with incontinence : a qualitative study of elderly women with urinary incontinence

Foster, Patricia Margaret January 1987 (has links)
Urinary incontinence has been described as a devastating symptom, an embarrassing condition, and a major geriatric problem, creating substantial personal, medical, and social difficulties. Urinary incontinence is a problem which affects men and women of all ages, but is predominantly a concern for elderly women! It is estimated that 50% to 75% of cases of incontinence are hidden or unreported. A review of the literature on urinary incontinence reveals numerous studies describing prevalence rates and types of incontinence. Characteristics of incontinent individuals and experimental studies comparing different treatments are also available. However, qualitative studies of urinary incontinence as it is experienced by elderly women are nonexistent. The purpose of this study is to explore and describe the impact of living with untreated urinary incontinence upon the daily lives of elderly women living in the community. The phenomenological approach to qualitative methodology was used for this study. This approach seeks to discover and describe the human experience as it is lived, and for this study, that experience was living with untreated urinary incontinence. Incontinent women, 60 years of age and over, were contacted through seniors' community centres, seniors' newspapers, and community service agencies. Nine women served as informants and participated in intensive interviews guided by open-ended questions. Verbatim transcriptions of these interviews and field notes from contact with seniors provided the data for analyses. Four major themes comprise the research findings: the recognition of incontinence, the avoidance of exposure, the need for information, and the redefinition of normal. The first theme describes the women's struggle to recognize the incontinence for what it was, acknowledging to themselves that it was an ongoing problem. Even after incontinence was recognized, the women emphasized the importance of keeping their symptoms hidden. This avoidance of exposure necessitated reorganization of their lives and limited opportunities to talk about problems with incontinence. Despite their hesitation in talking about incontinence, the women identified a compelling need for information. Finally, over and above these three management strategies, living with incontinence led to an attitudinal strategy of redefining what would constitute normal. For these women, this new definition of normal included incontinence. In light of these findings, implications for nursing education and practice are identified. Suggestions for future research stemming from this study conclude the discussion. / Applied Science, Faculty of / Nursing, School of / Graduate
6

Effect of behavioral therapy on urinary incontinence among community-dwelling older women

黃智君, Wong, Chi-Kuan, Ada. January 2008 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Nursing Studies / Master / Master of Nursing
7

Urinary incontinence in the elderly aspects of knowledge and quality of aids /

Månsson-Lindström, Ann. January 1994 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Lund University, 1994. / Added t.p. with thesis statement inserted.
8

Urinary incontinence in the elderly aspects of knowledge and quality of aids /

Månsson-Lindström, Ann. January 1994 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Lund University, 1994. / Added t.p. with thesis statement inserted.
9

Effect of behavioral therapy on urinary incontinence among community-dwelling older women

Wong, Chi-Kuan, Ada. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.Nurs.)--University of Hong Kong, 2008. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 73-82)
10

A critical study of the application of the fluid bridge test before, during and after surgery for stress incontinence in women

Murray, A. January 1988 (has links)
No description available.

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