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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Elements of the play behavior of the preschool hospitalized child an ethological approach

McDougall, Ruth Ann, 1943- January 1972 (has links)
No description available.
2

Hospital care utilization trends in patients with COPD and lung cancer in the 6 months prior to death

2014 November 1900 (has links)
Background: Hospital care utilization has been described as a key measurable indicator of care quality in patients with terminal respiratory diseases. Knowledge about patterns in service utilization for patients with advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), however, is fairly limited. The goal of this study was to investigate health care utilization patterns in the last six months of life among patients who died with COPD compared with those who died of lung cancer, and also to examine variations in health care among individuals living with COPD between sex, age, comorbidity, and temporal trends. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study using administrative health data in the province of Saskatchewan to identify indicators associated with greater hospital care utilization between 1997 and 2006. Those with either COPD or lung cancer as the underlying cause of death (UCOD) were included in this study. Characteristics examined in this study included socio-demographics, comorbidity, location of death, and use of institutional services. Multiple logistic regression was the primary method of analysis. Results: Between 1997 and 2006, 7,114 persons covered by Saskatchewan Health were identified as having COPD (N=2,332) or lung cancer as the UCOD (N=4,782). Approximately 60% were males with an average age of 74.2 years (S.D. =10.1 years). Half of the decedents were rural dwellers (47.0%), and were married or common law (51.6%). The majority had multiple comorbid conditions (60.3%), died in hospitals (73.5%), and had never received services from long-term supportive care institutions (74.3%). Compared with those who died from lung cancer, people dying from COPD were less likely to be admitted to hospitals (OR=0.71, 95%CI: 0.64-0.80 in the last six months of life; OR=0.81, 95%CI: 0.70- 0.93 in the last month of life) and had shorter LOS for each admission (OR=0.78, 95%CI: 0.70-0.87 in the six months of life; OR=0.67, 95%CI: 0.60-0.75 in the last month of life). However, persons with COPD were more likely to be managed in an intensive care settings (5.3% of COPD subjects vs. 1.7% of lung cancer subjects in the last six months of life; 4.3% of COPD subjects vs. 0.06% of lung cancer subjects in the last month of life) and had higher numbers of transfers between long-term care facilities (7.7% of COPD subjects vs. 3.2% of lung cancer subjects). Between 1997 and 2006, there was no significant change in the hospital utilization among patients who died of COPD or those who died of lung cancer. Conclusions: Marked differences in terms of hospital service utilization in the last six months of life were observed between subjects dying with COPD and lung cancer. Our study results support previous work indicating that the nature of care management at the end of life for people who died of advanced COPD is different from those who died from lung cancer, which was reflected by reduced likelihood of hospital service usage, more ICU admissions, and frequent transfers between supportive care facilities. There is no significant change observed regarding the patterns of hospitalization over 10-year study period. We would suggest collecting more information on services managed in other care settings, such as emergency departments, out-patient settings, and clinics, etc. This would allow an in-depth examination regarding what types of institutional services influenced the usage of in-patient care. In addition, education of all health care professionals on the complex needs of patients living with respiratory illnesses is required.
3

Staff empathy and the outcome of psychiatric hospitalization the patients' perspective /

Morgan, Nancy R. January 1984 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1984. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 53-57).
4

Laboratory data and patient safety

Jenkins, James J., January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Ohio State University, 2005. / Title from first page of PDF file. Includes bibliographical references (p. 180-184).
5

New national strategies for hospital infection control : a critical evaluation

Birnbaum, David Wayne 05 1900 (has links)
Isolation of those ill with contagious disease has been a fundamental infection control concept for hundreds of years. However, recent studies suggest that fewer than 50% of health—care workers comply with their hospitals' isolation precaution policies and that efficacy of some of those policies is questionable. In response, two new systems, based upon fundamentally different goals, were promoted. The Centers for Disease Control, prompted by health—care worker& concerns about occupational risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from a growing number of patients with acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome (AIDS), issued formal guidelines in 1987. This formed the basis for Universal Precautions (UP), a unifying strategy for precautions with all patients regardless of diagnosis intended to reduce risk to hospital staff members. Also in 1987, one hospital issued guidelines for Body Substance Isolation (BSI), hygienic precautions to be used with all patients based on recognition that colonized body substances are important reservoirs for cross—infection to both patients and staff members. These new strategies have been promoted widely, but there have been no formal assessments to reconcile controversies they raised nor to confirm their effectiveness. Further, necessary assessment tools have not been validated. This thesis provides new tools and new information to address three vital questions: Have hospitals adopted Universal Precautions or Body Substance Isolation? Do their staff members use the new system of precautions in daily practice? Has reliable use of a new system led to decreased risk of infection? A confidential mailed survey of all acute—care Canadian hospitals was conducted to measure rates of guideline receipt and adoption. It also obtained information on motivations for and perceived effectiveness of strategies adopted. A self—selected group of responding hospitals subsequently participated in standardized covert observation of their nurses infection control practices, then had the observed nurses complete a test examining their knowledge and beliefs. Employee health records were also examined to determine whether needlestick injury rates had changed since adoption of a new infection control strategy. Most Canadian hospitals adopted and modified new strategies based upon reasonable but unproven extensions of logic to protect health—care workers from HIV. 74% claimed UP (65%) or BSI (9%) but only 5% of 359 claiming UP and 0 of 50 claiming BSI adopted all policies expected. Many hospitals had not received key guideline publications. Guideline source, hospital size, and other variables were significantly associated with receipt. Nurses in 35 hospitals were observed to wear gloves during only z60% of procedures in which gloving was expected; rates varied widely among hospitals. Direct examination of sharps disposal containers confirmed compliance with a policy to not recap used needles (taken as recapping rate of 25%) in only 47% of 32 hospitals. Paired analysis of needlestick injury rates in 11 hospitals during comparable 90—day periods before versus after implementing UP/BSI showed no significant difference. 489 nurses completing a written test achieved their highest scores and least discordance among questions regarding procedural issues established long before UP/BSI, and lower scores or greater discordance on UP/BSJ concepts of philosophy, risk recognition and newer procedures. Positive correlation between knowledge and practice was not evident. UP and BSI now mean different things in different hospitals and have not been effective in harmonizing health—care workers’ infection control practices. Carefully standardized assessment methods are needed to guide their evolution to cost—effectiveness.
6

New national strategies for hospital infection control : a critical evaluation

Birnbaum, David Wayne 05 1900 (has links)
Isolation of those ill with contagious disease has been a fundamental infection control concept for hundreds of years. However, recent studies suggest that fewer than 50% of health—care workers comply with their hospitals' isolation precaution policies and that efficacy of some of those policies is questionable. In response, two new systems, based upon fundamentally different goals, were promoted. The Centers for Disease Control, prompted by health—care worker& concerns about occupational risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from a growing number of patients with acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome (AIDS), issued formal guidelines in 1987. This formed the basis for Universal Precautions (UP), a unifying strategy for precautions with all patients regardless of diagnosis intended to reduce risk to hospital staff members. Also in 1987, one hospital issued guidelines for Body Substance Isolation (BSI), hygienic precautions to be used with all patients based on recognition that colonized body substances are important reservoirs for cross—infection to both patients and staff members. These new strategies have been promoted widely, but there have been no formal assessments to reconcile controversies they raised nor to confirm their effectiveness. Further, necessary assessment tools have not been validated. This thesis provides new tools and new information to address three vital questions: Have hospitals adopted Universal Precautions or Body Substance Isolation? Do their staff members use the new system of precautions in daily practice? Has reliable use of a new system led to decreased risk of infection? A confidential mailed survey of all acute—care Canadian hospitals was conducted to measure rates of guideline receipt and adoption. It also obtained information on motivations for and perceived effectiveness of strategies adopted. A self—selected group of responding hospitals subsequently participated in standardized covert observation of their nurses infection control practices, then had the observed nurses complete a test examining their knowledge and beliefs. Employee health records were also examined to determine whether needlestick injury rates had changed since adoption of a new infection control strategy. Most Canadian hospitals adopted and modified new strategies based upon reasonable but unproven extensions of logic to protect health—care workers from HIV. 74% claimed UP (65%) or BSI (9%) but only 5% of 359 claiming UP and 0 of 50 claiming BSI adopted all policies expected. Many hospitals had not received key guideline publications. Guideline source, hospital size, and other variables were significantly associated with receipt. Nurses in 35 hospitals were observed to wear gloves during only z60% of procedures in which gloving was expected; rates varied widely among hospitals. Direct examination of sharps disposal containers confirmed compliance with a policy to not recap used needles (taken as recapping rate of 25%) in only 47% of 32 hospitals. Paired analysis of needlestick injury rates in 11 hospitals during comparable 90—day periods before versus after implementing UP/BSI showed no significant difference. 489 nurses completing a written test achieved their highest scores and least discordance among questions regarding procedural issues established long before UP/BSI, and lower scores or greater discordance on UP/BSJ concepts of philosophy, risk recognition and newer procedures. Positive correlation between knowledge and practice was not evident. UP and BSI now mean different things in different hospitals and have not been effective in harmonizing health—care workers’ infection control practices. Carefully standardized assessment methods are needed to guide their evolution to cost—effectiveness. / Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies / Graduate
7

A systematic review on integrated care pathway for children who need surgical intervention

Chung, Yuk-lan, Ida., 鍾玉蘭. January 2006 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Nursing Studies / Master / Master of Nursing in Advanced Practice
8

Perceived information needs of the newly admitted medical-surgical patients

Phelps, Sarah Gertrude January 1979 (has links)
No description available.
9

Staff and patient perceptions of psychosocial environmental press on psychiatric wards with high and low patient violence

Sikes, Lucy Anne January 1979 (has links)
No description available.
10

A child's impressions of hospitalization /

D'Agostino, Janice. January 2000 (has links)
The research problem in this qualitative, pilot study explores a child's impressions of hospitalization while in hospital. / Nine children who were in-patients on a pediatric unit of an acute care hospital were interviewed using a semi-structured, self-constructed questionnaire. / The principal finding indicates that these children experienced a neutral emotional response to their hospitalization. Although the subjects were chosen randomly, all children resided in two parent families. This may be a significant factor in enhancing their ability to master hospitalization. Second, their neutral impression of hospitalization may be based on receiving a reasonable level of health care in a child centred environment with support from family.

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