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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Protocol Use in a Professional Learning Community: Teachers' Perceptions of Instructional Design and Understanding of Students' Critical Thinking

Rieck, Jeffery D. 01 January 2011 (has links)
Leaders in business, government, and education have sought to improve students' ability to think critically. While research on professional learning communities (PLCs) suggests PLCs positively impact standardized test scores and teacher efficacy, there is little evidence of how PLCs using inquiry protocols influence teachers' perceptions of instructional design for critical thinking and understanding students' critical thinking. Demands for critical thinking instruction rather than test preparation, plus teachers' misunderstanding of their students' critical thinking, support the purpose for this case study. This study examined how PLCs using inquiry protocols influence teachers' perceptions of instructional design for critical thinking and understanding students' critical thinking. The theoretical framework for this study drew from several theories, its emphasis was on constructivism in PLCs' use of inquiry protocols and critical thinking. PLC participants from an existing PLC agreed to join the study when asked during a PLC meeting. Eleven voluntary participants taught in 3 different grade levels and 8 subject areas. An inductive analysis of participant field notes, transcripts from PLC sessions, and group interviews indicated a divergence in participant understanding. Participants reflected either clarity or confusion in designing critical thinking projects and understanding students' critical thinking. Implications for a positive social change develop as the PLC becomes a model for other classroom teachers seeking to teach beyond state testing mandates. This study addressed the district's perceived need to advance instruction for critical thinking. PLC stakeholders seeking to maximize teacher clarity and minimize teacher confusion around critical thinking may use this study to identify actions to emulate as well as actions to eliminate.
2

A first study of local attitudes and problems in providing sex education in Hong Kong secondary schools.

Ho, Yan-tak, Katherine. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.(Ed.))--University of Hong Kong, 1972. / Mimeographed.
3

An evaluation of individually prescribed instruction in the primary grades of the Urbana schools

Gaskill, Edgar Allen. Thomas, Clayton F. January 1970 (has links)
Thesis (Ed. D.)--Illinois State University, 1970. / Title from title page screen, viewed Sept. 9, 2004. Dissertation Committee: Clayton Thomas (chair), J.H. McGrath, Ronald Layman. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 107-112) and abstract. Also available in print.
4

Legislating sex : the influence of public opinion on sex education policy in Virginia /

Rafal, Emily Suzanne. January 2010 (has links)
Thesis (Honors)--College of William and Mary, 2010. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 62-68). Also available online.
5

A first study of local attitudes and problems in providing sex education in Hong Kong secondary schools

Ho, Yan-tak, Katherine. January 1971 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.(Ed.))--University of Hong Kong, 1972. / Also available in print.
6

Task-based Language Teaching versus Present, Practice, Produce: Efficacy in Language Learning and Assessment

Noroozi, Majeed 01 November 2018 (has links)
Long (2015) defines Task-based Language Teaching (TBLT) as “an approach to course design, implementation, and evaluation intended to meet the communicative needs of diverse groups of learners” (p. 5). Task-based Language Teaching has been introduced and developed by second language acquisition researchers as well as language educators in response to the teacher dominated and focus-on-formS methods of language teaching in classrooms such as the approach of Present, Practice, Produce (PPP) (Van den Branden, 2006). The present study aimed to build upon the previous literature on the possible differential effects of the PPP approach and TBLT on students’ language learning (e.g., De la Fuente, 2006;; Lai, Zhao, & Wang, 2011; Li, Ellis & Zhu, 2016; Gonzalez-Lloret & Nielson, 2015; Shintani, 2011, 2013) which have examined the differential effects of these two language methodologies on learners’ language learning. The present study aimed to address the methodological drawbacks of the Li et al. (2016) study by including Task-based Language Assessment (TBLA) in its methodology alongside the GJT and the EIT so as to obtain a more comprehensive picture of the comparison of PPP and TBLT. Thirty-four [e1] participants from three English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classes at the lower intermediate level of proficiency participated in this study, which took place at the Parsian Language Institute located in the city of Ghaemshahr in Iran. The three classes were randomly assigned to three groups of TBLT, PPP, and Control. Learning was measured with the same types of tests as the Li et al. (2016) study, i.e., a GJT and an Elicited imitation test; however, a Task Assessment was added. Participants were administered the pre-assessments, then participated in the TBLT, PPP and Control group treatments, respectively, and finally performed the post-assessments. A Wilcoxon Signed Ranked Test revealed that the performance of TBLT and PPP on the GJT and the EIT significantly improved from pre-assessment to post-assessment, while the Control group did not show any significant improvements on any of the tests. As for the task assessment, results showed that only the TBLT group made significant improvements on their post-assessment, while the PPP and Control group did not statistically improve [e1]Spell out at the beginning of sentences.
7

Using Fan Fiction to Bridge Students’ Understanding of Science

Jennings, LaShay, Moran, Renee M., Pierce, Blake 01 January 2022 (has links)
The purpose of this chapter was to present current literature focused on integrating science and literacy and describe the teaching of a science unit of study that incorporated fanfiction literature in a fourthgrade classroom. Ms. Bardon’s instructional techniques were focused on integrating science learning with reading and writing based within a fictional text read together as a classroom community throughout the unit of science study. The unit of study was presented alongside background literature to illustrate how such teaching is indicative of a larger movement in the educational field toward science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)-based pedagogy and curriculum. The account of teaching was presented according to the close reading of the fictional text, the hands-on science activities, and the culminating student writing of a fanfiction narrative that constituted the assessment of science learning.
8

Teacher Decisions About Using Fan Fiction To Bridge Students’ Understanding of Science

Jennings, LaShay, Moran, Renee M., Pierce, Blake 01 November 2020 (has links)
The purpose of this chapter was to present current literature focused on integrating science and literacy and describe the teaching of a science unit of study that incorporated fanfiction literature in a fourthgrade classroom. Ms. Bardon’s instructional techniques were focused on integrating science learning with reading and writing based within a fictional text read together as a classroom community throughout the unit of science study. The unit of study was presented alongside background literature to illustrate how such teaching is indicative of a larger movement in the educational field toward science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)-based pedagogy and curriculum. The account of teaching was presented according to the close reading of the fictional text, the hands-on science activities, and the culminating student writing of a fanfiction narrative that constituted the assessment of science learning.
9

Integrating Literacy and STEM in a Study of the Black Panther

Honeycutt, Scott R., Keith, Karin, Moran, Renee R., Hong, Huili, Jennings, Jody 01 January 2018 (has links)
No description available.
10

Book Review: Facilitating Learning With the Adult Brain in Mind by Taylor, K. & Marienau, C.

Jennings, LaShay 01 January 2020 (has links)
No description available.

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