• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 10
  • 5
  • Tagged with
  • 16
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE CONTROL OF THE RELEASE OF MELANOCYTE STIMULATING HORMONE FROM THE PARS INTERMEDIA

Bower, Cecile Annette, 1933- January 1972 (has links)
No description available.
2

Melanophores : functional and morphological studies of intracellular transport and transfer of melanosomes /

Aspengren, Sara. January 2006 (has links)
Univ., Diss.--Göteborg, 2006. / Enth. außerdem 5 Zeitschriftenaufsätze.
3

Observations on melanophore control in the larvae of the South African clawed toad, Xenopus laevis (Daudin)

Shaskan, Edward G. January 1965 (has links)
No description available.
4

Melanophores : cell biophysics and sensor applications /

Testorf, Martin, January 1900 (has links) (PDF)
Diss. (sammanfattning) Linköping : Univ., 2001. / Härtill 5 uppsatser.
5

Melanophores : functional and morphological studies of intracellular transport and transfer of melanosomes /

Aspengren, Sara. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Göteborg University, 2006. / Includes bibliographical references.
6

Biologically inspired biosensors from fish chromatophores

Young, Jun 12 July 1996 (has links)
This thesis explores the feasibility of using melanophore-based biosensors from Oreochromis niloticus. Melanophores are one type of pigmented cell of the scales and fins of fish that respond in a motile fashion to a diverse range of stimuli. Fish scales were employed as the first step in determining the utility of melanophores as biosensors. Responsiveness of melanophores in scales was quantitated with several bioactive agents. Experiments with depolarizing potassium ion, guanethidine, yohimbine (an adrenergic antagonist), and capsaicin (a sensory stimulant) provided evidence that melanophores are under nervous regulation. Conditions were developed to allow simplification of intact scale preparations, entailing epidermal removal and dennervation of scales. This simplification resulted in increased sensitivity and responsiveness to a larger array of bioactive agents, including a cyclic AMP analog. The simplified preparation was successfully tested for its ability to function as a biosensor using pharmaceutical eye drops; the response observed was determined to be due to naphazoline, an adrenergic agonist. Methods were developed that enabled culturing of chromatophores independent from scales. Cultured chromatophores were found to be responsive to bioactive agents with a comparable degree of sensitivity as simplified scale preparations. Attempts were undertaken to develop co-cultures of chromatophores with other cell types and with further development melanophore-based biosensors can be exploited. / Graduation date: 1997
7

IONIC REQUIREMENTS FOR MELANOPHORE REGULATION

Vesely, David L., 1943- January 1972 (has links)
No description available.
8

Melanophore signaling : regulation and application /

Andersson, Tony, P. M. January 2003 (has links) (PDF)
Diss. (sammanfattning) Linköping : Univ., 2003. / Härtill 5 uppsatser.
9

An in vitro study of gas and gbs adrenoreceptors in melanosome differential aggregation and dispersion associated with cryptic patterning in winter flounder (Pleuronectes americanus) /

Mayo, Dennis Joseph, January 1996 (has links)
Thesis (M.Sc. )--Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1997. / Bibliography: leaves 77-80.
10

Signaling for color change in melanophores : and a biosensor application /

Karlsson, Annika, January 1900 (has links)
Diss. (sammanfattning) Linköping : Univ., 2001. / Härtill 4 uppsatser.

Page generated in 0.0371 seconds