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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Systematic and ecological relations of Peromyscus oreas and P. maniculatas

Sheppe, Walter Alvin January 1958 (has links)
Systematic analysis of 2500 Peromyscus specimens from Washington and British Columbia shows that P. oreas is largely reproductively isolated from P. maniculatus, and it is raised to specific status. These species maintain their identities over large areas in which they are sympatric. Some specimens may be hybrids, and a few samples may be from intergrade populations. P. m. austerus and P. m. artemisiae produced fertile hybrids in the laboratory, but P. oreas failed to breed. Field studies revealed that oreas and maniculatus are in part ecologically isolated in areas where both occur. Both species have more restricted habitat distribution in the presence of the other, and interspecific competition is suggested as a cause. Greatest reproductive activity was in spring and early summer; there was no breeding in late summer. Oreas ceased to breed earlier than maniculatus. In June adults outnumbered young of the year in the catch, but by July this was reversed. Young males were caught more often than young females, but adult females were caught more often than adult males, suggesting that females live longer than males. Oreas probably developed partial reproductive isolation when separated from other Peromyscus stocks by Pleistocene glaciation. It has remained distinct from maniculatus through a combination of geographical, ecological, temporal, psychological, and genetic isolation. / Science, Faculty of / Zoology, Department of / Graduate
2

An investigation into the physical basis of the pirouette mutation in the house mouse (Mus musculus)

Walden, Adelene Mary January 1951 (has links)
The object of this investigation was to study the abnormal behavior produced by the pirouette mutation in the house mouse (Mus musculus) and to determine its physical basis. The pirouette mutation first appeared in 1943 and was described by Wolley and Dickie (1945) who gave it the genetic symbol pi. This recessive mutation is located on the third chromosome of the house mouse. Mice homozygous for this mutation show mixed circling, head shaking and deafness. The abnormal movements commence fourteen days after birth and these mice are evidently deaf throughout their entire lives. Similar abnormal movements and deafness have been produced not only by other mutations in mice but also in other animals including man. A survey of the literature revealed many possible sources of abnormalities which could produce the atypical behavior of the pirouette mouse and these reported sources of abnormalities were investigated with the following results: 1. Muscles of the head, neck and thorax were normal. 2. Liver gross and histological anatomy was normal. 3. Brain gross anatomy was normal. 4. Skull - gross anatomy was normal. 5. Eighth nerve - gross and histological study revealed no tumors. 6. Ear - gross anatomy and blood supply normal. - histological studies showed degenerative changes within the spiral ganglion, stria vascularis and organ of Corti within the cochlea. The degenerative changes within the cochlea of pirouette mice are similar to those reported in waltzing and shaker-1 mice but their time of onset and sequence of degenerative changes are different. In the pirouette mouse the extensive loss of nerve cells within the spiral ganglion later followed by degenerative changes in the stria vascularis and in the organ of Corti suggests that the cause of these changes lies outside the cochlea. The fact that the degenerative changes of all structures are found first and most extensively in the basal whirl and later in the middle and upper whirls of the cochlea also supports the contention that the change is external to the cochlea and gradually involves the whole organ. Similar changes are known to be produced by tumors, osseous compression or severing of the eighth nerve or lesions within the brain. Since in the pirouette mouse no tumors were present and since the nerve was intact, there remains only the possibility, of osseous compression or lesions within the central nervous system causing this abnormality. / Science, Faculty of / Botany, Department of / Zoology, Department of / Graduate
3

Development of mouse morulae after encapsulation in alginate microgels or poly-l-lysine microcapsule /

Krentz, Kathleen J., January 1991 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1991. / Vita. Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 78-87). Also available via the Internet.
4

Development of the embryonic trisomy 1 mouse

Smith, Barbara S. January 1985 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1985. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 132-139).
5

Selecting for lean gain efficiency in mice using different seletion criteria /

Holder, Ridley B. January 1996 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 1996. / Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 78-87). Also available on the Internet.
6

Selecting for lean gain efficiency in mice using different seletion criteria

Holder, Ridley B. January 1996 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 1996. / Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 78-87). Also available on the Internet.
7

Refining the location of the frizzy (fr) mutation on Mus musculus Chromosome 7 /

Thompson, David S. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.) -- Central Connecticut State University, 2006. / Thesis advisor: Thomas R. King. "... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts in Biomolecular Sciences." Includes bibliographical references (leaves 36-41). Also available via the World Wide Web.
8

... A comparative life history study of the mice of the genus Peromyscus

Svihla, Arthur, January 1932 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Michigan, 1931. / Thesis note in foot-note on p. [5]. "Literature cited": p. 37-39.
9

Is mshi/mshi sterility the result of caspase-3-mediated apoptosis of spermatogonia at puberty? /

Compton, Tiwanna M., January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Central Connecticut State University, 2004. / Thesis advisor: James Mulrooney. " ... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Cell and Molecular Biology." Includes bibliographical references (leaves 32-35). Also available via the World Wide Web.
10

Brain development in the trisomy 19 mouse

Mieden, Gregory Dean. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1983. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 57-68).

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