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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

An analysis of the demand for new passenger vehicles in South Africa (1995-2005) / Sonwabo Zide

Zide, George Sonwabo January 2012 (has links)
This dissertation analyses the determinants of demand for new passenger vehicles in South Africa over a ten-year period, between 1995 and 2005. The following investigation into the determinants of demand for new passenger cars, is based both on a statistical and empirical analysis of the performance of the South African new passenger car market. Firstly, in Chapter 2 a brief history of the South African motor in industry provides a background for the analysis which follows in this dissertation and gives some insight into the historical developments that created the structure of the industry during the period analysed by the study. The theoretical components of the thesis focus on the macro-economic theory of demand, which seeks to explain the influences which determine consumer demand when purchasing durable goods and more specifically new passenger cars. Chapter 3 explains how consumers trade off preferences and substitutes in their efforts to maximise their utility. When comparing the general theory of demand to the theory of demand for durable goods and more specifically the theory of demand for new passenger cars, it is demonstrated that the theory of demand for new passenger cars is inherently different to that of non-durable goods. New passenger cars and other durable goods require a relatively higher investment, last longer than non-durable goods and literally retain some of their value, as they get older. Chapter 3 creates a theoretical foundation upon which the determinants of demand for passenger cars will be analysed in Chapter 4. Chapter 4 forms the base upon which the South African New Passenger Car Market will to be analysed. In Chapter 4 the study statistically and graphically analyses the primary economic determinants of demand for new passenger cars. The analyses first present the relationship between price and new passenger car demand. It was found that demand for new passenger cars was price elastic. It was also identified that price elasticity of demand changed over the ten-year period analysed. Next, the impact of population growth and personal disposable income on new passenger car demand was analysed. It was discovered that should the population grow faster than the economy; relative prices unchanged, personal disposable income will decline and thereby affect desired stocks of new passenger cars negatively. The effect of disposable income on the sale of new passenger cars was found to be income inelastic. Income elasticity also, however displayed signs of change over the analysed period. The effect of the rate of interest on the demand for the new passenger cars was also analysed. The analysis indicated that changes in interest rates resulted in changes of various proportions in all rates of interest in the economy; such an effect filtered through to the new passenger car market. After this, the effect of GDP on the demand for new passenger cars was examined. The examination found that changes in the new passenger car market correlated very closely with GDP growth changes, hence GDP changes served as an important indicator of the new passenger car market. The result of changes in the price of fuel on new passenger car demand was also examined. The result showed that the structure of the market, i.e. the size of cars, etc. was more affected than the volume of sales. Finally, the effect of the level of confidence in new passenger car demand was analysed. Business and consumer confidence were found to be good indicators of the new passenger car market. Chapter 5 concluded and summarised the findings of the dissertation. The study also noted that the effects of South Africa’s upgraded public transport system in the form of the Bus Rapid Transport System (BRT) and the Gautrain on the demands of new passenger cars could be a case for future research. / Thesis (MCom (Economics))--North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2012
2

An analysis of the demand for new passenger vehicles in South Africa (1995-2005) / Sonwabo Zide

Zide, George Sonwabo January 2012 (has links)
This dissertation analyses the determinants of demand for new passenger vehicles in South Africa over a ten-year period, between 1995 and 2005. The following investigation into the determinants of demand for new passenger cars, is based both on a statistical and empirical analysis of the performance of the South African new passenger car market. Firstly, in Chapter 2 a brief history of the South African motor in industry provides a background for the analysis which follows in this dissertation and gives some insight into the historical developments that created the structure of the industry during the period analysed by the study. The theoretical components of the thesis focus on the macro-economic theory of demand, which seeks to explain the influences which determine consumer demand when purchasing durable goods and more specifically new passenger cars. Chapter 3 explains how consumers trade off preferences and substitutes in their efforts to maximise their utility. When comparing the general theory of demand to the theory of demand for durable goods and more specifically the theory of demand for new passenger cars, it is demonstrated that the theory of demand for new passenger cars is inherently different to that of non-durable goods. New passenger cars and other durable goods require a relatively higher investment, last longer than non-durable goods and literally retain some of their value, as they get older. Chapter 3 creates a theoretical foundation upon which the determinants of demand for passenger cars will be analysed in Chapter 4. Chapter 4 forms the base upon which the South African New Passenger Car Market will to be analysed. In Chapter 4 the study statistically and graphically analyses the primary economic determinants of demand for new passenger cars. The analyses first present the relationship between price and new passenger car demand. It was found that demand for new passenger cars was price elastic. It was also identified that price elasticity of demand changed over the ten-year period analysed. Next, the impact of population growth and personal disposable income on new passenger car demand was analysed. It was discovered that should the population grow faster than the economy; relative prices unchanged, personal disposable income will decline and thereby affect desired stocks of new passenger cars negatively. The effect of disposable income on the sale of new passenger cars was found to be income inelastic. Income elasticity also, however displayed signs of change over the analysed period. The effect of the rate of interest on the demand for the new passenger cars was also analysed. The analysis indicated that changes in interest rates resulted in changes of various proportions in all rates of interest in the economy; such an effect filtered through to the new passenger car market. After this, the effect of GDP on the demand for new passenger cars was examined. The examination found that changes in the new passenger car market correlated very closely with GDP growth changes, hence GDP changes served as an important indicator of the new passenger car market. The result of changes in the price of fuel on new passenger car demand was also examined. The result showed that the structure of the market, i.e. the size of cars, etc. was more affected than the volume of sales. Finally, the effect of the level of confidence in new passenger car demand was analysed. Business and consumer confidence were found to be good indicators of the new passenger car market. Chapter 5 concluded and summarised the findings of the dissertation. The study also noted that the effects of South Africa’s upgraded public transport system in the form of the Bus Rapid Transport System (BRT) and the Gautrain on the demands of new passenger cars could be a case for future research. / Thesis (MCom (Economics))--North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2012
3

Study of a share based passenger mix model

Varghese, Libin Koshy 16 August 2012 (has links)
A passenger mix model (PMM) is used by airlines to find out how many passengers will fly on a fleet schedule. There are numerous ways of modeling passenger mix models and this report studies a share based passenger mix model, proposed by Sabre, and tests its efficacy against a deterministic linear program (DLP) passenger mix model. A DLP passenger mix model cannot recapture spilled passengers and requires iterations of the same model to recapture passengers. In order to eliminate the iterative nature of the DLP model Sabre proposed a new model which eliminates iterations for recapturing passengers. This report studies the proposed share based passenger mix model and compares it with the DLP model in terms of traffic allocation and speed of solution. It is found that the share based model allocates traffic in the same manner as the tried and tested DLP model. / text
4

A 3 dimensional contingency model of project management : An exploration of task-centred groups in two large organisations

Partington, K. D. January 1983 (has links)
The t t es i s explores the structure and process of proje c t manage ment in two Passenger Transport Executives(G .M. P . T. E . and S. Y . ~ . T.E ) In view of thedearth of practical advice on· proj ect management , the research i s con c erned n ot only wi th the wider i mp li cat io~s of pro j ec t management but a l s o to provide valid counsel to practisi ng managers . Issues raised in the litera ture sugg es t ed that successful project management was a com plex, shifting amal gam of four " id eE l~ ty pes , whose boundarie s were delineated by two structural d i mens ion s (Un structured- Structur ed and Proj ect orienta ti on- Functional orientation) . Al th ough the concept of power was c ommon to both dim ens i ons , each wa~ felt to constitute a sepa r ate ~~ pect of proj ect ma ~ agement and it was h ypothes i sed that successful pr oj ect management came about from the management of a II dynamic balance " a cross b ot h dime ns i ons - maintaining a crude trade off which at any poi n t in time would be gov erned by the characteristics of the task , environment and the culture of the incumbent or gani sati on . Exhaustive analysis of 6 pro j ect g r oups added to the working ~ypo theses suggested by the literature . In the empirica l melting pot , observations, analysis and working hypotheses were coalesc ed to g i ve a normative three- dimensional contingency model of proj e c t nan6gement and retros pe ctively , the relative success or fa ilure of proj ect ma nagement i n both organisa tions is explained with reference t o this model. The results underline the i mportance of training and of past experience in group problem- solving te chn i ques . But the experience of project manage~e nt in G. K. T. and S . Y. T. sug gests that admini s trators contemnlating project ma" ageme n~ shoul d consi der the culture of their organi sa ti on and pay due re ga rd to the likely strength of cult ural and historice.l opposi ti on . The research a lso pOi nts to the need fo r careful "hand s-on" manage ment to ensure the mai ntenance of a dynami c balan c e over the life of the proje ct- exe rcising a crude trade~~ff between t he vertical and l ateral dimensions of proj e ct management . In a wider philosophical and theoretical s ense the research shows the folly of exercising simple structural expedients to solve complex problems of organisation and concludes t hat there are no simple solutions to the problem of incre asi ng organisational s i ze and complexity , and no short c uts to organi sational f l exibility .
5

Airport access and travel time uncertainty

Taylor, Robin January 1996 (has links)
The implications of travel time uncertainty on the operational efficiency of airport terminals have until now not been examined. With the forecast growth in congestion levels predicted for all modes of transport, not only will travel time uncertainty increase but its impact may increase also. The first part of this thesis covers the analysis of two passenger surveys conducted at Manchester Airport and Birmingham Airport. These surveys had the objective of providing evidence to support or dispute the belief that air travellers react to travel time uncertainty. The research identifies that passengers do react by allowing margins of safety for their access journeys, and that this change in behaviour will modify the arrival distribution patterns at airports. The second part of this thesis examines how airport passenger flows could be altered by a change in the arrival distribution of originating passengers at airport terminals. Three airports - Manchester, Birmingham and East Midlands International - are modelled using a simulation tool and tested to assess how a shift in arrival distribution affects queuing and peak passenger volumes within the airport terminal. The findings of this thesis show that airport passenger terminal operational efficiency is affected by access journey time uncertainty. It also identifies that passenger decision making can only be explained by various combinations of factors. Possible methods of minimising the effects of travel time uncertainty are considered. The advantages and disadvantages of access journey time uncertainty for airports and airlines are discussed. It concludes that, to be successful in overcoming negative aspects, both parties must provide a service that results in customer satisfaction. This is the only sure way to maintain their respective revenue levels and secure their future in what is becoming an increasingly competitive industry.
6

An analysis of the phases of customer loyalty development and their sustaining and vulnerability elements

McMullan, W. Rosalind I. January 2003 (has links)
No description available.
7

The development and testing of a non-recursive aggregate passenger travel demand modelling approach

Neto, I. U. January 1988 (has links)
No description available.
8

A simulation analysis of the passenger check-in system

Arnett, John Douglas January 1971 (has links)
The objective of this thesis is to provide a comprehensive management tool that will aid in policy formulation and evaluation of Air Canada's Passenger Check-in System. The tool is a computer simulation model that was verified to ensure that representative information could be derived from the model concerning the state of the real system. The model can be used to determine the effects of a given policy or passenger arrival composition on the three performance objectives of the system; namely, the utilization of the baggage and ticket facilities, a minimum passenger waiting time in the system, and the checking-in of passengers in accordance with procedural policy. The simulation model describes the state of the system and subsequent assessment of the effect of a policy on the objectives with their statistics: 1. the average utilization of the facilities, 2. the percentage of passengers exceeding two and a half minutes in any one queue, 3. the average transit time per passenger (summation of delay times in the system). An analysis utilizing the simulation model was undertaken in three areas of policy management. They are: To determine the implications of the behaviour of the Passenger Check-in System on policy formulation. 2. To determine the facility policy that should be implemented in order to achieve the present service policy as well as the maximum capacity of the system. 3. To formulate alternative operating policies and test for viability prior to implementation of the policy. The results of the analysis were as follows: 1. The service policy that a minimum of 15% of the Revenue passengers be allowed to exceed 2.5 minutes of waiting time has been formulated correctly. 2. The nature of the system is such that greater utilization of facilities will not be achieved by a nominal increase in the allowable percentage of passengers exceeding 2.5 minutes. 3. The facility policy and associated methodology has been formulated so that the objectives of the system will be attained. A. The maximum capacity of the system occurs when the arrival rate is in excess of 200 passengers per 15 minute period. 5. The use of a single queue at the Revenue ticket counter will ensure greater attainment of the system objectives than the use of multiple queues. 6. The combining of the baggage and ticket operations at one counter is a viable alternative in the present system. / Business, Sauder School of / Graduate
9

Urban characteristics as the determinants of air passenger generation

Ghosh, Ranen Kumar January 1973 (has links)
Both the process of designing better plans and the process of evaluating plans depend heavily on a detailed understanding of the interrelationships among urban activities. This thesis explores the relationship between some of the characteristics of urban areas and their air passenger generation. The research methodology consists of a review of the literature on air passenger generation. Secondly, data from thirty-nine Canadian cities are used for empirical analysis. Factor analysis, grouping analysis and multiple regression techniques are employed. The results explain that, in general, the factor of urbanization plays an important role in determining air passenger generation from urban areas. Also, for some cities, the trade and service functions discourage air passenger generation to some extent. Moreover, this study suggests that available techniques of analysis can be used successfully, to improve upon those which are commonly used in developing predictive equations for air passenger generation. It is evident from the models developed in this study that, for a group of cities, the more they are similar in their characteristics, the better is the predictive equation. Finally, the implications and limitations of this study have been discussed along with the suggestions for further research. / Applied Science, Faculty of / Community and Regional Planning (SCARP), School of / Graduate
10

The measurement of passenger preferences towards rail station and on-train facilities

Pearmain, David January 1993 (has links)
No description available.

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