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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Exploring Usage of the Word "Values": Implications and Opportunities for Planning

Varangu, Anne January 2006 (has links)
Explicitly and implicitly, planners make choices about values and use values to make choices. Values are presented as reasons to do and not to do in setting goals and during participatory planning processes, cited in scholarly articles used as planning knowledge, and purposefully collected by surveys. Attention to values is generally focused on substantive and procedural dimensions, such as determining what peoples' values are or deciding which values are relevant, in what circumstances, and at what point in planning processes. As well, planners may have a particular interest in understanding why people take particular positions on values, especially when values appear to conflict with values embedded in particular planning purposes and proposals. <br /><br /> Most of such usage of "values" takes the meaning of values for granted. It begins with an assumption of shared understanding about what "values" are. This thesis takes a step backwards to explore whether or not this assumption is warranted by identifying what appear to be different and disconnected usages of the word "values". <br /><br /> The first part of the thesis considers the history of usage of the word "values" and objections to using values language before proposing a theory about diverse usage of values. This theory was developed using grounded theory methodology, an iterative method of constant comparison and contrast applied to thousands of examples of values usage. Examples were gathered from contemporary everyday usage and from a broad range of scholarly material dating back to the late 1800s. These examples included but were not limited to examples from planning. Conclusions reached in the study of values are then used as a basis for developing three propositions that are applied to planning: (1) <strong>Calling something "a value", instead of a belief, principle, attitude and so on, can make a difference;</strong> (2) <strong>Particular usages of "values", no matter how diverse, are expressions of a concept of values in general;</strong> and (3) <strong>A questioning attitude should be attached to all values usage by default. </strong> For values to be a useful planning tool, the propositions should have explanatory value and create new opportunities for analysis and understanding of values usage in planning. <br /><br /> That there are multiple ways of using "values" suggests that planners have a choice in deciding how to use values. The third proposition is used as a starting point for proposing a usage of values that may be particularly suited to sustainability planning. The proposed usage takes into consideration the implications of a theory about diverse usage and a flexible and vague concept of values in general, the diverse history of usage of the word "values", objections to the use of values language, diverse usage of "values" in planning in general and the needs of planning. <br /><br /> Sustainability planning appears to have a particularly desperate need for integrating values across sectors into which society and ideas about society are organized. The usage of values proposed for sustainability planning is applied to a case study of a municipal sustainability initiative to consider its explanatory value and how a different understanding of values might have affected the planning process and subsequent implementation of the sustainability policy. If this theory about values holds in application to planning, then values may be a powerful tool with which to challenge convention and the status quo. <br /><br /> Conclusions are drawn about the desirability and feasibility of explicit and deliberate use of the word and idea of "values" in planning and suggestions are made for further research.
2

Planning Revitalization of the Fringe: A Case Study of Edmonton's Downtown East

Szekely, Katrina January 2009 (has links)
In cities across Canada, there are many examples of central areas within, adjacent to or just outside of downtowns that remain underdeveloped. There is great opportunity to redevelop these areas into vibrant, sustainable, dense neighbourhoods that can reduce the demand for greenfield development as our cities grow. There is a great deal of research on large sites that are completely void of development, and similarly on revitalizing areas that have a built up physical form. What is lacking in the research is information on how to approach the revitalization of areas that are physically underdeveloped, but are not a blank slate. As considerable physical redevelopment is necessary, this complicates the already complex process of revitalization as it is neither simply a major redevelopment project nor a community revitalization exercise. The purpose of this research is to begin to fill this gap in the literature through the study of one specific case: Edmonton’s Downtown East. Downtown East, located immediately east of downtown Edmonton in Alberta, represents a central area that is physically underdeveloped and in need of revitalization, with 40% of the land in the area laying vacant. This research seeks to determine what the most appropriate vision is for Downtown East. A qualitative, mixed-method approach was used to derive a vision for the Downtown East based on the history and context of the area. Findings of this research are structured around a detailed history and context of the area, including a review of significant redevelopment initiatives since the 1970s. From these findings, a discussion of the paths and barriers to revitalization in this area follows. Finally, recommendations are made for the Downtown East. A vision formed from the collective responses of key informants is put forward. Some strategic starting points for implementing this vision are then recommended based on the findings and discussion in earlier chapters. Recommendations are made for further research regarding the implementation of a vision, as this research revealed that one of the largest barriers to revitalization of the Downtown East was an effective approach to implementation of revitalization initiatives.
3

‘Go softly through nature please’: Assessing four paradigms of naturalized park design.

Dwyer, Michael January 2011 (has links)
This study compared four prominent landscape design paradigms in a naturalized park landscape setting. The landscape designs included, natural state, visible stewardship, people places and physical accessibility. The selected landscape variables included preference, naturalness, accessibility and use. Three distinct participant groups were selected and can be categorized as, ‘environmental or ecology’, ‘civically engaged around parks’ and ‘accessibility concerns in the public landscape’. The objective was to identify best practices in naturalized park design and to further existing academic research in the areas of landscape perception and preference. Three landscape types including open, riparian, and enclosed path were selected. The principles of the four design paradigms were applied. The methodology included the use of computer visualizations to provide for a common backdrop for the design implementations. Rating exercises as well as in-depth semi-structured interviews were completed. This research not only sought to determine what was preferred, but why it was preferred. The findings indicate that landscapes that are perceived as natural and designed to limit human influence and respect contextual ‘fit’ were most preferred. The research also uncovered a potential cognitive aspect of perceived accessibility in the landscape. The research findings highlight the depth of connection to naturalized park landscapes among all participants and a higher degree of similarity than expected in terms of expectations and wants among the participant groups.
4

Biomedical Pollutants and Urban Waste Management in the Accra Metropolitan Area, Ghana: A Framework for Urban Management of the Environment (FUME)

Squire, Jeffrey Nii 27 June 2012 (has links)
Ecosystems provide essential necessities required for the sustenance of life including food, water, medicine, aesthetics, recreational and spiritual outlets. Preserving and maintaining the integrity, carrying capacity, diversity and functions of ecosystems is therefore necessary for sustainability. Naturally, ecosystems are resilient and have the ability to bend and flex with various stressors while retaining their integrity, provided the challenges are not overwhelming. On the other hand, consistent mismanagement can result in the transformation of pulse disturbances into chronic and compounded perturbations. Ultimately, this can result in the dilapidation, alteration and in some case, removal of ecosystems. In many developing countries, ineffective management of urban wastes contributes to the magnification of risks to ecosystems and public health. Particularly perturbing is the mismanagement of biomedical pollutants generated during the course of healthcare activities. Biomedical wastes are known to contain infectious, toxic and radioactive substances that carry a greater risk for the environment and public health than regular urban wastes. In spite of the risk factors, mismanagement of biomedical pollutants is widespread in many developing countries. Predicated primarily on post-positivist epistemology, this case study research investigated systemic and institutional arrangements pertaining to the management of urban wastes including biomedical pollutants in the Accra Metropolitan Area (AMA), Ghana. The research uncovered major deficiencies in management of urban wastes and biomedical pollutants which contributes to elevated risks to the environment and public health. The underlying causes of the problems were found to be embedded in deficiencies relating to weak governance, feckless regulations, resource constraints, corruption, technological limitations, service delivery and a general lack of awareness. As part of the research, an eclectic Framework for Urban Management of the Environment (FUME) was developed to address gaps in existing environmental planning and decision-making approaches. The FUME model consists of salient features of the precautionary principle, ecosystem approach, adaptive management, co-management, environmental risk management and integrated waste management.
5

Exploring Usage of the Word "Values": Implications and Opportunities for Planning

Varangu, Anne January 2006 (has links)
Explicitly and implicitly, planners make choices about values and use values to make choices. Values are presented as reasons to do and not to do in setting goals and during participatory planning processes, cited in scholarly articles used as planning knowledge, and purposefully collected by surveys. Attention to values is generally focused on substantive and procedural dimensions, such as determining what peoples' values are or deciding which values are relevant, in what circumstances, and at what point in planning processes. As well, planners may have a particular interest in understanding why people take particular positions on values, especially when values appear to conflict with values embedded in particular planning purposes and proposals. <br /><br /> Most of such usage of "values" takes the meaning of values for granted. It begins with an assumption of shared understanding about what "values" are. This thesis takes a step backwards to explore whether or not this assumption is warranted by identifying what appear to be different and disconnected usages of the word "values". <br /><br /> The first part of the thesis considers the history of usage of the word "values" and objections to using values language before proposing a theory about diverse usage of values. This theory was developed using grounded theory methodology, an iterative method of constant comparison and contrast applied to thousands of examples of values usage. Examples were gathered from contemporary everyday usage and from a broad range of scholarly material dating back to the late 1800s. These examples included but were not limited to examples from planning. Conclusions reached in the study of values are then used as a basis for developing three propositions that are applied to planning: (1) <strong>Calling something "a value", instead of a belief, principle, attitude and so on, can make a difference;</strong> (2) <strong>Particular usages of "values", no matter how diverse, are expressions of a concept of values in general;</strong> and (3) <strong>A questioning attitude should be attached to all values usage by default. </strong> For values to be a useful planning tool, the propositions should have explanatory value and create new opportunities for analysis and understanding of values usage in planning. <br /><br /> That there are multiple ways of using "values" suggests that planners have a choice in deciding how to use values. The third proposition is used as a starting point for proposing a usage of values that may be particularly suited to sustainability planning. The proposed usage takes into consideration the implications of a theory about diverse usage and a flexible and vague concept of values in general, the diverse history of usage of the word "values", objections to the use of values language, diverse usage of "values" in planning in general and the needs of planning. <br /><br /> Sustainability planning appears to have a particularly desperate need for integrating values across sectors into which society and ideas about society are organized. The usage of values proposed for sustainability planning is applied to a case study of a municipal sustainability initiative to consider its explanatory value and how a different understanding of values might have affected the planning process and subsequent implementation of the sustainability policy. If this theory about values holds in application to planning, then values may be a powerful tool with which to challenge convention and the status quo. <br /><br /> Conclusions are drawn about the desirability and feasibility of explicit and deliberate use of the word and idea of "values" in planning and suggestions are made for further research.
6

Planning Revitalization of the Fringe: A Case Study of Edmonton's Downtown East

Szekely, Katrina January 2009 (has links)
In cities across Canada, there are many examples of central areas within, adjacent to or just outside of downtowns that remain underdeveloped. There is great opportunity to redevelop these areas into vibrant, sustainable, dense neighbourhoods that can reduce the demand for greenfield development as our cities grow. There is a great deal of research on large sites that are completely void of development, and similarly on revitalizing areas that have a built up physical form. What is lacking in the research is information on how to approach the revitalization of areas that are physically underdeveloped, but are not a blank slate. As considerable physical redevelopment is necessary, this complicates the already complex process of revitalization as it is neither simply a major redevelopment project nor a community revitalization exercise. The purpose of this research is to begin to fill this gap in the literature through the study of one specific case: Edmonton’s Downtown East. Downtown East, located immediately east of downtown Edmonton in Alberta, represents a central area that is physically underdeveloped and in need of revitalization, with 40% of the land in the area laying vacant. This research seeks to determine what the most appropriate vision is for Downtown East. A qualitative, mixed-method approach was used to derive a vision for the Downtown East based on the history and context of the area. Findings of this research are structured around a detailed history and context of the area, including a review of significant redevelopment initiatives since the 1970s. From these findings, a discussion of the paths and barriers to revitalization in this area follows. Finally, recommendations are made for the Downtown East. A vision formed from the collective responses of key informants is put forward. Some strategic starting points for implementing this vision are then recommended based on the findings and discussion in earlier chapters. Recommendations are made for further research regarding the implementation of a vision, as this research revealed that one of the largest barriers to revitalization of the Downtown East was an effective approach to implementation of revitalization initiatives.
7

‘Go softly through nature please’: Assessing four paradigms of naturalized park design.

Dwyer, Michael January 2011 (has links)
This study compared four prominent landscape design paradigms in a naturalized park landscape setting. The landscape designs included, natural state, visible stewardship, people places and physical accessibility. The selected landscape variables included preference, naturalness, accessibility and use. Three distinct participant groups were selected and can be categorized as, ‘environmental or ecology’, ‘civically engaged around parks’ and ‘accessibility concerns in the public landscape’. The objective was to identify best practices in naturalized park design and to further existing academic research in the areas of landscape perception and preference. Three landscape types including open, riparian, and enclosed path were selected. The principles of the four design paradigms were applied. The methodology included the use of computer visualizations to provide for a common backdrop for the design implementations. Rating exercises as well as in-depth semi-structured interviews were completed. This research not only sought to determine what was preferred, but why it was preferred. The findings indicate that landscapes that are perceived as natural and designed to limit human influence and respect contextual ‘fit’ were most preferred. The research also uncovered a potential cognitive aspect of perceived accessibility in the landscape. The research findings highlight the depth of connection to naturalized park landscapes among all participants and a higher degree of similarity than expected in terms of expectations and wants among the participant groups.
8

Drought-proneness and human response: Case study of Orissa

Patnaik, Manjurani 10 1900 (has links)
Drought-proneness
9

The perceptions and satisfaction of group members in relation to participation in program planning activities

Sudad, Sahir Hassan, January 1972 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1972. / Typescript. Vita. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
10

Biomedical Pollutants and Urban Waste Management in the Accra Metropolitan Area, Ghana: A Framework for Urban Management of the Environment (FUME)

Squire, Jeffrey Nii 27 June 2012 (has links)
Ecosystems provide essential necessities required for the sustenance of life including food, water, medicine, aesthetics, recreational and spiritual outlets. Preserving and maintaining the integrity, carrying capacity, diversity and functions of ecosystems is therefore necessary for sustainability. Naturally, ecosystems are resilient and have the ability to bend and flex with various stressors while retaining their integrity, provided the challenges are not overwhelming. On the other hand, consistent mismanagement can result in the transformation of pulse disturbances into chronic and compounded perturbations. Ultimately, this can result in the dilapidation, alteration and in some case, removal of ecosystems. In many developing countries, ineffective management of urban wastes contributes to the magnification of risks to ecosystems and public health. Particularly perturbing is the mismanagement of biomedical pollutants generated during the course of healthcare activities. Biomedical wastes are known to contain infectious, toxic and radioactive substances that carry a greater risk for the environment and public health than regular urban wastes. In spite of the risk factors, mismanagement of biomedical pollutants is widespread in many developing countries. Predicated primarily on post-positivist epistemology, this case study research investigated systemic and institutional arrangements pertaining to the management of urban wastes including biomedical pollutants in the Accra Metropolitan Area (AMA), Ghana. The research uncovered major deficiencies in management of urban wastes and biomedical pollutants which contributes to elevated risks to the environment and public health. The underlying causes of the problems were found to be embedded in deficiencies relating to weak governance, feckless regulations, resource constraints, corruption, technological limitations, service delivery and a general lack of awareness. As part of the research, an eclectic Framework for Urban Management of the Environment (FUME) was developed to address gaps in existing environmental planning and decision-making approaches. The FUME model consists of salient features of the precautionary principle, ecosystem approach, adaptive management, co-management, environmental risk management and integrated waste management.

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