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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A consideration of the effectiveness and efficiency of employee training and development in a range of commercial organisations

Dowler, Alan Reginald January 1995 (has links)
No description available.
2

Staff development in secondary schools in the Eshowe District

Ngidi, Thelma Zenzele January 2002 (has links)
Submitted in part fuImment of the Requirements For the Degree of MASTER OFEDUCATION IN THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION UNIVERSITY OF ZULULAND, 2002. / The study focuses on staff development in secondary schools in the Eshowe District in order to examine its effectiveness. The aims of the study were as follows: • To determine the nature of staff development; • To determine whether staff development is there at secondary schools in Eshowe District; • To examine the staff development practices in Eshowe District and • To provide recommendations regarding the improvement of staff development programmes and to suggest methods on how schools should initiate staff development programmes. Survey method was used to gather the information. A 50 item questionnaire on provision of staff development were given to 15 high schools' principals of Eshowe District as a way of collecting data about staff development. The Eshowe District was divided into five circuits during the time of investigation. Three principals in each circuit were chosen randomly. The study identified the following areas: time constraints for staff development; staffing of schools; several departmental workshops and curriculum transformation. The conclusion drawn from the study was that staff development was ineffective in most secondary schools. In the light of the findings from the study the investigator suggested several recommendations.
3

Staff development at secondary schools in the Mthunzini District

Buthelezi, Alan Bhekisisa January 2001 (has links)
Submitted in Partial Fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Education, in the Department of Educational Planning and Administration at the University of Zululand, 2001. / The study deals with staff development at secondary schools in the Mthunzini district. Staff development practices at various secondary schools are examined in the study. The aims of this study were the following: • to determine the nature of staff development as described in relevant literature; • to investigate staff development practices at secondary schools in the Mthunzini district, and • to present the findings and recommendations which emanate from this study. Literature review was done on various textbooks, newspaper articles and journals related to the study. Various staff development theories and models were identified in order to relate them to the current staff development practices in the district under consideration. Detailed discussion of staff development initiatives that have been started by the KwaZulu-Natal department of education (Mthunzini district) also forms part of this study. The population of the study comprised principals of secondary schools in the Mthunzini district. Questionnaires were used to facilitate the process of collecting data. The study attended to learning/developmental activities; provision of staff development materials; sharing of knowledge and tasks, and work related skills that influence one's understanding of the job. Data analysis was both quantitative and qualitative. The findings of the study necessitated the investigator to make recommendations regarding staff development. / University of Zululand.
4

Exploring pull and push factors influencing human resources in two South African Health facilities

Sohaba, Nkosinathi 11 April 2013 (has links)
Study Title: Exploring Pull and Push Influencing Human Resources at two South African Health Facilities Introduction The magnitude of the health worker shortage in developing countries such as South Africa cannot be overstated and requires an urgent, sustained and coordinated response. In South Africa, the government has introduced many initiatives, such as the rural allowance, to attract more health practitioners in rural areas. However, human resource shortages remain a challenge and therefore looking at ways to better utilize the capacity of human resources could play a significant role in addressing this problem, and could contribute to establishing a well-functioning public health system. Objectives This study was aimed at exploring and describing factors that affect human resource capacity in two district hospitals in the Eastern Cape Province: one rural, one urban, and makes appropriate recommendations to health authorities so as to better utilize and retain human resource capacity within the facilities. Methods This is a qualitative study, using explorative and descriptive research strategies. The study was conducted in two district hospitals, one urban (hospital B) and one in a rural area (hospital A), both in the Eastern Cape Province. A total of thirty six in-depth interviews were conducted with allied health professionals and administrative staff – eighteen from each site - to explore their perceptions around “pull and push factors” in their work. Additionally, four interviews were conducted with district team members and key policy documents were reviewed. Results The availability of equipment, and quality of infrastructure, as well as relationships between staff differed between the two facilities and were cited as reasons affecting staff intentions to stay or leave. Loosely labelled as “working conditions”, these were perceived to be ‘better’ in the urban-hospital B than rural-hospital A, where staff morale was lower. Geographical differences, including surrounding infrastructure and the availability of services such as schools and recreational facilities, also affected staff decisions and intentions to stay or leave (more pronounced in the rural-hospital A). Opportunities for professional development were also perceived to contribute towards the retention of professional health workers. Conclusion Interviewees emphasized wanting more opportunities for professional development and improving their working and living conditions, as well as improving relationships between the hospitals and district structures. It is important to manage any incentivisation-process (financial and non-financial), including rural allowances and professional staff development, with more caution to ensure that they address the intended goals and do not result in unwanted consequences or tensions. Recommendations Improving conditions in rural areas is indeed a necessary step. Despite the introduction of rural allowances, for health professionals working in rural areas, rural public health facilities still experience a significant shortage of healthcare professional. Further research is needed to pilot and scale-up existing models aimed at promoting staff retention in these public health facilities.
5

Factors that influence the retention of middle managers in Company A

Malinga, Khethukuthula 28 June 2011 (has links)
Company A has experienced high voluntary staff turnover at middle management level between 2007 and 2009. During this period 35% of middle managers have resigned and, this has resulted in significant financial costs being incurred. This research focused on understanding what factors would make the current middle managers stay in Company A’s employment and what the financial impact has been due to these resignations. The research concluded that career development, people development by line manager, feedback of own work, a line manager who teaches and coaches subordinates, and working with a knowledgeable line manager, were the top five factors that would make the current middle managers stay in Company A’s employment. The research further concludes that there was a gap between Company A’s retention initiatives and what the middle managers actually value, thus the resignations. The research has also established that the middle managers’ resignations have had a significant financial impact on the organisation.
6

Factors that influence the retention of middle managers in Company A

Malinga, Khethukuthula 28 June 2011 (has links)
Company A has experienced high voluntary staff turnover at middle management level between 2007 and 2009. During this period 35% of middle managers have resigned and, this has resulted in significant financial costs being incurred. This research focused on understanding what factors would make the current middle managers stay in Company A’s employment and what the financial impact has been due to these resignations. The research concluded that career development, people development by line manager, feedback of own work, a line manager who teaches and coaches subordinates, and working with a knowledgeable line manager, were the top five factors that would make the current middle managers stay in Company A’s employment. The research further concludes that there was a gap between Company A’s retention initiatives and what the middle managers actually value, thus the resignations. The research has also established that the middle managers’ resignations have had a significant financial impact on the organisation.
7

An analysis of staff turnover in the optometric industry / by Marna Slabbert

Slabbert, Marna January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.B.A.)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2009.
8

An analysis of staff turnover in the optometric industry / by Marna Slabbert

Slabbert, Marna January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.B.A.)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2009.
9

An analysis of staff turnover in the optometric industry / by Marna Slabbert

Slabbert, Marna January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.B.A.)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2009.
10

An Assessment Of The Impact Of Decentralized Clinical Staff Pharmacists On Nurses At A Tertiary Referral Teaching Hospital

Schwehr, Jamin, Tarasiewicz, Jolene January 2007 (has links)
Class of 2007 Abstract / Objectives: To evaluate the impact of decentralized clinical staff pharmacists (CSPs) on nursing staff in a university- affiliated teaching hospital. Areas of interest include perceived quality of patient care, job satisfaction and nursing job retention. Methods: CSP impact was evaluated using a print-based survey utilizing outcomes items and a four-point Likert-type scale with response options ranging from “Agree” to “Disagree.” Nurses also answered demographic questions about experience, time at the institution, education leve and frequency of interaction with a CSP. Analysis of the data included use of descriptive statistics as well as use of Kendall’s tau-b to evaluate differences between groups based frequency of CSP interaction. Results: Respondents included 122 nurses at University Medical Center (UMC) in Tucson, Arizona in positions supported by a CSP during the summer of 2006. Nurses overwhelmingly selected “Agree” or “Somewhat Agree” for all 12 statements about the CSPs indicating that they found their interaction with CSPs valuable. Nurses who interacted more frequently with CSPs were more likely to “Agree” or “Somewhat agree that CSPs were valuable members of the hospital (p=.049), one reason they remained at UMC (p=.007), helpful with medication questions (p=.008) and improved job satisfaction (p=.013), made their job easier (p=<.001) as well as more enjoyable (p=.027)

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