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Dietary assessment and self-perceived impact of food in persons with multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disease of uncertain etiology and pathology, affected by genetic and environmental factors. Nutrition may be one of these factors. This study used one validated 80-item food frequency questionnaire and one 24-hour recall to assess dietary intake, anthropometric and lifestyle practices, and self-perceived impacts of food in 36 adults with MS. Although only 3 persons followed special diets for MS, 28 indicated food influenced the way they felt, and 17 thought food directly impacted their MS. Over 50% of participants were identified as potential underreporters of energy. Low intakes in grains, dairy, and fruits and vegetables were commonly observed. The FFQ and 24-hour recalls estimated different mean sample intakes of all nutrients; these differences were significant for carbohydrates, water, iron, magnesium, riboflavin, niacin, and omega-3. Both tools identified mean intakes below suggested AI levels for fibre, calcium, vitamin D, omega-3 and omega-6, and above the UL for sodium. Supplements were used by 72% of participants, and increased estimated nutrient intakes above the EAR or the UL for some nutrients in some individuals.

Identiferoai:union.ndltd.org:LACETR/oai:collectionscanada.gc.ca:QMM.112524
Date January 2008
CreatorsKilborn, Sally J.
PublisherMcGill University
Source SetsLibrary and Archives Canada ETDs Repository / Centre d'archives des thèses électroniques de Bibliothèque et Archives Canada
LanguageEnglish
Detected LanguageEnglish
TypeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation
Formatapplication/pdf
CoverageMaster of Science (School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition.)
RightsAll items in eScholarship@McGill are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
Relationalephsysno: 002712150, proquestno: AAIMR51292, Theses scanned by UMI/ProQuest.

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