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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

The ladies and the cities : transformation and apocalyptic identity in Joseph and Aseneth, 4 Ezra, the Apocalypse and The shepherd of Hermas

Humphrey, Edith McEwan 1991 (has links)
Transcendence and transformation have been established as key motifs in apocalypses. The transformation of a seer during a heavenly journey is found commonly in such esoteric apocalypses as I Enoch. No heavenly journey occurs in the works treated here. Rather, symbolic women figures--"ladies" in the classical sense--who are associated with God's City or tower, undergo transformation at key points in the action. The surface structures of Joseph and Aseneth, 4 Ezra, the Apocalypse and The Shepherd of Hermas are traced, and the crucial transformation episode or episodes are located within each structure. Transformation of figures representing God's people suggests the significance of identity within the apocalyptic perspective. Apocalypses allow the world to be viewed from the future or from the heavens (J. J. Collins' "temporal" and "spatial" axes); the genre also invites the reader to change identity (the "identical" axis), and so become someone in tune with divine mystery and revelation.
42

Uiteensetting en evaluering van die Chiliastiese verklaring van Op. 20, 1-10 : 'n apologeties-eksegetiese studie / Abraham Pretorius Kruger

Kruger, Abraham Pretorius 1983 (has links)
Werkstuk voorgelê in die vierde studiejaar vir die graad Theologiae Baccalaureus in die Fakulteit Teologie aan die Potchefstroomse Universiteit vir Christelike Hoër Onderwys Assignment (ThB)--PU for CHE, 1983
43

Uiteensetting en evaluering van die Chiliastiese verklaring van Op. 20, 1-10 : 'n apologeties-eksegetiese studie / Abraham Pretorius Kruger

Kruger, Abraham Pretorius 1983 (has links)
Werkstuk voorgelê in die vierde studiejaar vir die graad Theologiae Baccalaureus in die Fakulteit Teologie aan die Potchefstroomse Universiteit vir Christelike Hoër Onderwys Assignment (ThB)--PU for CHE, 1983
44

Future tense : an analysis of science fiction as secular apocalyptic literature

Thompson, Mary-Anne Carey 1985 (has links)
Bibliography: leaves 208-219. Religious apocalyptic literature appears to have been written in response to a situation of crisis in which the believers found themselves. It is the catalyst which provided the energy which the society needed in order to withstand that crisis, and it did this by radically inverting the dimensions which make up a worldview, that is the dimensions of time and space, and the classification of groups, so that it reflects the possibility of a new order, a new heaven and a new earth. Since the nineteenth century, the Western world has seen itself in a constant state of crisis in terms of the rapid secularisation, industrialisation and urbanisation, and it would seem that the notion of an apocalypse is still relevant. But religious visions of the apocalypse do not seem to have relevance to the largely secular society they would have been addressing. Something new, immediate and drastic was needed, which would supply the society with the energy to withstand the crisis of a secular world. Science fiction as a literary genre arose in the late nineteenth century, and it would seem as if the new social situation generated a new symbolic vocabulary for ancient apocalyptic themes, in other words, science fiction appeared as an imaginative literary genre of mythic, apocalyptic dimensions to address this situation. In the same way as religious visions of the apocalypse, science fiction inverts the components of a worldview so that a new social order, a new heaven and a new earth are seen as possible. In order to explore this theme, science fiction is examined in the light of radical inversion of accepted worldviews, and the genre is divided into three historical periods in order to understand the conditions under which it was written, as well as the content of the material involved. These periods are: 1. Apocalypses of Expectation and Hope. The late nineteenth century and the early twentieth century; the beginnings of the genre in the crisis of rapid industrialisation, secularisation and urbanisation, using the works of Jules Verne and H G Wells. 2. Apocalypses of Irony and Despair. The nineteen twenties to the end of the Second World War; the crises of the two World Wars on a complacent world, using the works of Aldous Huxley and George Orwell. 3. Apocalypses of Destruction and Redemption. The nineteen fifties to the present; the crisis of nuclear power and thinking machines, using the works of Frank Herbert and Isaac Asimov. Also examined are the quasi-religious nature of science fiction, apocalypse as a cleansing agent of the universe, and the myths of noble survivors of post-apocalyptic literature and films. In the light of the above, it can be understood why science fiction can be seen as the functional equivalent to religious apocalyptic myth, but relevant to the largely secular Western world of the twentieth century.
45

Entropy in Two American Road Narratives

Deskin, Sean 17 December 2010 (has links)
Tony Tanner's book City of Words analyzes American literature from 1950-1970; in the chapter entitled "Everything Running Down" the theme of entropy, the second law of thermodynamics, is explored and revealed to be a common motif within many works of American literature. Tanner's analysis does not specifically address the presence of entropy within the genre of the American road narrative; when considering his analysis presented in "Everything Running Down" with Kris Lackey's analysis of American road narratives presented in his book RoadFrames, the presence of entropy and how it is applied within the American road narrative becomes apparent. Although Jack Kerouac's On the Road and Cormac McCarthy's The Road were published over sixty years apart from one another and are seemingly disparate texts, these two texts reveal the thematic use of entropy which connects them in an ongoing dialogue within the genre of the American road narrative.
46

The archived future : North American apocalyptic fiction and the ambiguous construction of the present

Kwong, Tsz Ching 1 January 2013 (has links)
No description available.
47

Creators, Creatures and Victim-Survivors: Word, Silence and Some Humane Voices of Self-Determination from the Wycliffe Bible of 1388 to the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights 1993.

Keable, Penelope Susan 1995 (has links)
This analysis of apocalyptic rhetoric brings nine generations of the written text of the Johannine Apocalypse into a contemporary (1989-1994) framework which includes phenomena such as self-determination, mutual interdependence and psychoterror. The discussion is mediated by disciplines and backgrounds of Religion and Literature. The critical method is religio-literary. Literary themes from the Johannine Apocalypse, especially themes of annihilation, torment, blessedness and rapture, structure the discussion. These themes are related to ideas of self-determination such as were proclaimed at the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights (UNWCHR), Vienna, 1993. The discussion questions the axioms of self determination, especially the matter of indivisibility which came to issue during UNWCHR, Vienna, 1993. Some policies and practices of the Australian government's human rights activities are discussed. Attention is then redirected to the Johannine Apocalypse as a polyvalent source of apocalyptic ideation and a source of social empowerment.
48

Creators, Creatures and Victim-Survivors: Word, Silence and Some Humane Voices of Self-Determination from the Wycliffe Bible of 1388 to the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights 1993.

Keable, Penelope Susan 1995 (has links)
This analysis of apocalyptic rhetoric brings nine generations of the written text of the Johannine Apocalypse into a contemporary (1989-1994) framework which includes phenomena such as self-determination, mutual interdependence and psychoterror. The discussion is mediated by disciplines and backgrounds of Religion and Literature. The critical method is religio-literary. Literary themes from the Johannine Apocalypse, especially themes of annihilation, torment, blessedness and rapture, structure the discussion. These themes are related to ideas of self-determination such as were proclaimed at the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights (UNWCHR), Vienna, 1993. The discussion questions the axioms of self determination, especially the matter of indivisibility which came to issue during UNWCHR, Vienna, 1993. Some policies and practices of the Australian government's human rights activities are discussed. Attention is then redirected to the Johannine Apocalypse as a polyvalent source of apocalyptic ideation and a source of social empowerment.
49

Apokaliptiek en Openbaring 'n kritiese evaluering van Malina en Pilch se "Social-Science Commentary on the Book of Revelation"

Swart, Cornelius Johannes. 2006 (has links)
Thesis (MA(Bybel en Godsdienskunde)--Universiteit van Pretoria, 2006. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 123-126)
50

Understanding the premillennial apocalyptic rhetoric of Sun Bear : the controversial, contemporary prophet of the Earth changes

Czerwinski, Anne Marie 2000 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2000. Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 379-401). Also available on the Internet.

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