• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 122
  • 116
  • 16
  • 1
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 4196
  • 1222
  • 495
  • 319
  • 134
  • 126
  • 104
  • 91
  • 82
  • 77
  • 75
  • 73
  • 70
  • 65
  • 65
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Social research for social justice : Alva and Gunnar Myrdal and Viola Klein and the history of social science research

Stina Lyon, E. 2011 (has links)
This thesis addresses questions about the tension in the history of sociology between academic self-description and the practical actuality of ‘doing sociology’ in traditionally broader social and political contexts. In focusing on the work and careers of three socially committed sociological researchers: Gunnar and Alva Myrdal and Viola Klein, it aims to show that activities in the margin of a discipline in themselves constitute an important field of inquiry illustrating the inherent dilemmas and tensions of the discipline: between science and values, theory and practice, the ideological and the pragmatic, the public and the domestic, the institutionalised and the free-lance, and finally between different kinds of values in relationship to the ‘social’. One of the main arguments of the thesis is that the explicit egalitarian and democratic value orientation of the Myrdals and Klein became both the source of their fame and the curse that left them, and the topics to which they theoretically and empirically addressed themselves, marginalised in the discipline. The ten published papers that form the main part of the thesis were written over a period of ten years each with its own particular research focus, but all within the overall aim of contributing to a broader and more contextual and international history of sociological activities. Several papers address the social context of the work and intellectual careers of the Myrdals and Klein as individual contributors to the discipline. Three papers have a special focus on mutual correspondence and collaboration as a source of information about the learning trajectory of individuals, but also about the development of the discipline and its many dilemmas, contradictions and shifting boundaries. A further two papers raise more general questions about the errors and pitfalls in writing intellectual biography and about the changing social and political context of being a public intellectual.
2

A social anthropological study of Kirkby Stephen

Middleton, Dorothy 1971 (has links)
Kirkby Stephen is a relatively isolated parish in Rural North Westmorland. The population is concentrated in a small town and nearby farms and cottages. The economy is considered to be in a state of crisis due to factors beyond the control of the local people. Several attempts are being made to revitalise it, but these are frustrated by parochial loyalties, traditional ways of doing things and the fact that it is impossible to isolate economic from political factors and the other factors which make up the social system, Kirkby Stephen has many points in common with rural Wales and pre Second World War Ireland. The peculiarity of Kirkby Stephen is that, in spite of its many contacts with urban influences, it retains so many of the features by which Frankenberg characterises the 'truly rural' community. Although the majority of the population oppose ‘new’ ideas and attempt to reject urban values, social change is taking place. Formal and informal non-sectarian leisure time activities are changing in character. In the sectarian activities changes are less obvious. For, although attendance at religious services in Kirkby Stephen has followed the national trend, sectarian activities are well patronised. The religious sphere has several distinctive features, the two most outstanding being the stressing of Temperance as an important aspect of Nonconformity, in particular Methodism, and the fact that 19th Century Nonconformist Ideals very largely form the basis of the local value system. The most socially active age group in the society is the over 60's. It is the old in years and residence who are the decision- takers in the society. Society respects them and in extreme old age cares for them. In doing this the people display independence of the Welfare State and the fact that they are a community not just an association of people. In conclusion the community's orientation towards the rural rather than the urban life is evaluated and the belief that they are isolated from other communities is seen to result in intensification of kinship obligations and the social interdependence of the whole community.
3

A study of some relationships between religious belief, feelings of guilt and self-evaluation

Fiske, Paul F. B. 1971 (has links)
Kirkby Stephen is a relatively isolated parish in Rural North Westmorland. The population is concentrated in a small town and nearby farms and cottages. The economy is considered to be in a state of crisis due to factors beyond the control of the local people. Several attempts are being made to revitalise it, but these are frustrated by parochial loyalties, traditional ways of doing things and the fact that it is impossible to isolate economic from political factors and the other factors which make up the social system. Kirkby Stephen has many points in common with rural Wales and pre Second World War Ireland. The peculiarity of Kirkby Stephen is that, in spite of its many contacts with urban influences, it retains so many of the features by which Frankenberg characterises the 'truly rural' community. Although the majority of the population oppose 'new' ideas and attempt to reject urban values, social change is taking place. Formal and informal non-sectarian leisure time activities are changing in character. In the sectarian activities changes are less obvious. For, although attendance at religious services in Kirkby Stephen has followed the national trend, sectarian activities are well patronised. The religious sphere has several distinctive features, the two most outstanding being the stressing of Temperance as an important aspect of Nonconformity, in particular Methodism, and the fact that 19th Century Nonconformist Ideals very largely form the basis of the local value system. The most socially active age group in the society is the over 6o•s. It is the old in years and residence who are the decisiontakers in the society. Society respects them and in extreme old age cares for them. In doing this the people display independence of the Welfare State and the fact that they are a community not just an association of people. In conclusion the community's orientation towards the rural rather than the urban life is evaluated and the belief that they are isolated from other communities is seen to result in intensification of kinship obligations and the social interdependence of the whole community.
4

Identities in transition : formulating care for people with profound learning disabilities

Hewitt, Helen L. 1997 (has links)
This research presents a qualitative analysis of issues concerning the care and identities of people with profound learning disabilities moving from hospital to a community home. Life story books were introduced and investigated as a resource for presenting biographical information about the clients. Talk concerning the compilation and subsequent use of these life story books, during the transition from hospital to community care, was examined using discourse analysis. Analysis reveals how parents and carers constitute mutual identities of themselves and the person with learning disabilites. Although the clients can not talk for themselves they are represented. by their carers and relatives, as having a position on their own identities and those of others around them. These fmdinas contribute to the debate on the nature of relationships between people with learning disabilities and their carers. Interdependencies between research and practice, are also examined through an analysis of the way the life story books are used in the setting.
5

Radio in a transitional society: the case of modern Thailand

Siriyuvasak, Ubonrat 1989 (has links)
The thesis, Radio in a Transitional Society: The Case of Modern Thailand, is an exploratory study of radio in its total context. In arguing that it is the structure and process of the system of production, distribution and consumption of the media that reproduce social stratification and political legitimation we undertake four major areas of investigation; the structure of ownership and control of the Thai radio system which basically constrained the range and formats of output in this arena, the dynamics of the media institutions and cultural industries within which entrepreneurs and professionals struggle to achieve organisation goals and their 'relative autonomy', the forms of representation - the 'serious genres' of news and current affairs and official commentaries and religious programmes, and the 'popular genres' of drama and music - through which ideological reproduction and contestation are played out, and lastly the active audience whom the state and the cultural industries must constantly negotiate for social integration and to fulfil their commercial goals. The study shows that the role of radio in cultural and social reproduction is highly complicated and contentious. Without examining the total system in relation to the dynamics of the economy in general and the power hierarchy we would either fall into the reductionist camp or trap in the simplistic connection between control of material and mental production argued by proponents of the dominant ideology thesis. On the contrary, we have demonstrated that disruption is possible and the transmission of any 'preferred meaning' must be negotiated. Although the notions of progress and salvation are predominant in the official programmes contestations from popular entertainment are manifested in presenting sensual pleasure as desirable whilst secularisation emerges. Nonetheless, in this dialectical relationship the arena of ideological struggle is delimited by the dynamics of the economy and political control. The thesis therefore, points the way to more detailed studies in the sociology of mass communications, particularly in the structure of ownership and control of the media industries as a whole and the tensions within them, and how alternative and oppositional discourses are curtailed, so as to better understand this complex process of representation, reproduction and contestation.
6

Living the differences : ethnicity, gender and social work

Lewis, Gail 1997 (has links)
This thesis concerns the entry of black women into local authority social service departments as qualified social workers in the 1980s. It argues that this entry needs to be understood in the context of a moment of racial formation and social regulation in which specific black populations were managed through a regime of governmentality in which 'new black subjects' were formed. These 'new black subjects' were constituted as 'ethnic-minorities' out of an earlier form of being as 'immigrants'. Central to this process of reconstitution was a discourse of black family forms as pathological and yet governable through the intervention of state agencies. As such, social work as a specific form of state organised intervention, articulated to a discourse of 'race' and black family formations. This articulation suggested that the management of those black families who could be defined as pathological or 'in need required a specific 'ethnic' knowledge and in this way a space for the entry of black women into qualified social work was created. This process also intersected with a time of riotous rebellion in many inner city areas and a moment of municipal socialism in which demands on the part of social movements for social reparation for inequality had been incorporated into the manifestos of political parties. This made it incumbent on such authorities to promote equality of employment opportunity within their departments. Whilst the discourses of 'race'/ethnicity and equal opportunities provided the impetus for the employment of black women as qualified social workers the understanding and experience of this employment was mediated through a sense of organisational and managerial exclusion. Thus the thesis ends with a consideration of the accounts of numerous black women social workers and their multi-racial, female and male managers.
7

Non traditional sex role socialisation : parents' perceptions of non-sexist childrearing

Statham, June A. 1984 (has links)
Despite a growth of research documenting attempts to counteract sex role stereotypes in the school and work environments and in the media, little is known about non-traditional sex role-socialisation within the home. This study explored the aims, philosophy and reported practice of thirty white, middle-class parents committed to non-sexist childrearing, who between them had eighteen daughters and twelve sons aged six months to eleven years. Data was collected through semi-structured interviewing, mostly carried out in 1979 and 1980, and four case-study' families were visited over a three-year period. The main finding was that the conception of non-sexist child-rearing held by these parents was more complex than the social learning position originally stressed by the Women's Liberation Movement, with its emphasis on controlling the child's environment in terms of toys, clothes, books, parental models and reinforcement patterns. The parents in this study also took account of the child's active participation in the socialisation process, of psychological factors within themselves and the dynamics of their relationship with their children, and of the role of economic and structural factors in limiting the possibilities for sex role change. They adopted an androgynous conception of sex roles and saw themselves as opening up more options for their children rather than as trying to reverse traditional sex roles or to make both sexes more masculine or more feminine. Non-sexist childrearing was perceived to be more difficult with sons than daughters, and most parents expressed greater ambivalence about raising sons in a less sex-stereotyped way. The emphasis in non-sexist childrearing was on altering the socialisation of daughters, and the impetus for sex role change came from women
8

Black people and criminal justice in England and Wales : a study on bail

Williams, Kadifa 2000 (has links)
The disproportionate rate of adverse police-black encounters, instances of unfair and unequal treatment by the police, in addition to the over-representation of black people in the total and remand prison population raises questions about the nature and extent of discrimination and racism in the criminal justice system. Reasons for the apparent differential treatment of black people in the criminal justice process remain contested. Much research on 'race' and criminal justice issues has produced contradictory findings and attempts to isolate a 'race' effect in criminal justice decision-making has been difficult. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, this thesis explores issues of 'race', racism and criminal justice focusing on bail and remand. From a statistical analysis of data from a bail survey at two north London magistrates' courts, it is argued that black males are remanded in custody at a higher rate than their white counterparts and overrepresented among those remanded in custody when compared to their proportion in the general population. Overall, even when significant factors such as seriousness of offence and age are taken into account, unexplained racial differences in bail decision-making remain. An analysis of qualitative data from black defendants and criminal justice practitioners supports the proposition that discrimination operates within the bail system and extends this argument to other stages of the criminal justice process. This thesis also examines how issues of racism and criminal justice have been 'explained' theoretically. From a critical examination of key theoretical positions of neoconservatism, critical criminology and left realism, it is argued that criminological theorising may never be able to fully 'explain' issues of racial discrimination. It is further argued that notwithstanding the important insights to the debate put forward by critical criminology, it still does not go far enough in such 'explanations', while neo-conservatism and left realism paint a distorted picture. Drawing on several existing themes from critical criminology, the notion of 'virtual criminality' is suggested as a way forward.
9

Liberating images : a feminist analysis of the girls' school-story

Humphrey, Judith Ann 2000 (has links)
The thesis uses a synthesis of feminist and literary theory to analyse the way in which girls' school-stories challenge and subvert traditional societal constructs and provide images of liberation for girls and women. The literary implications of a woman-centred universe are addressed in a study of plot and character. The texts provide a challenge to traditional literary representations of passive femininity, replacing them with images of active girls and women. There is tension between the domestic discourse and the discourse of adventure, but this is overcome by stress on character. The use of an interrogative subject position and of multiple and morally complex focalisers ensures that the identifying reader can maintain a position as subject within the text without being subjected to its ideology. The liberating images of the books are seen in education, games, religion and friendship. Girls were educated either to serve or to please men; the intellectual woman was an affront to the natural order as decreed by medicine and theology. School-stories challenge this by presenting for identification girls who find study exciting and fulfilling and professional women who have chosen a life connected with learning. Games for girls fundamentally questioned the construct of frail femininity shored up by medical theories of finite energy, by Darwinism and by the eugenics movement. Religion was an significant part of life, and the texts provide a rigorous analysis of faith. The role of the Headmistress, simultaneously omnipotent and strongly maternal, subverts the traditional image of woman and of God. Women have been defined socially by their relations to men and have been seen as incomplete without them. Close friendship for women was defined as diseased and problematic by the sexologists working at the beginning of the century. These relationships are reclaimed in school-stories in terms of deep, abiding love.
10

The origins of post war British sociology. 1850-1950 : a study in the struggle for intellectual hegemony : social scientists as the "absent centre"

Cox, Leonard Christopher 1993 (has links)
No description available.

Page generated in 0.0274 seconds