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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Selection of trainee clinical psychologists : a personal construct analysis

Ahmed, Almeera January 2005 (has links)
No description available.
2

What is the process by which placement supervisors make difficult decisions in trainee assessment

Anderson, Claire January 2012 (has links)
The literature review section of this thesis explores trainee nondisclosure in supervision. Adopting a narrative approach, the review argues that evaluation in supervision presents barriers to open disclosure, and has a detrimental impact on the intended functions of supervision. Eight empirical studies of supervisee nondisclosure were reviewed. Key findings relate to the apparent role of nondisclosure as a self-protective impression management strategy for supervisees in evaluative supervision. The review highlights a weakness in the existing literature in reference to the lack of focus of research on nondisclosure which is likely to be problematic. The review suggests that the evaluative component of supervision may be a motivator for nondisclosure particularly in reference to perceived clinical mistakes and difficulties within the supervisory relationship. Implications of problematic nondisclosure are identified, and recommendations for clinical practice and future research are made. The research paper section of the thesis presents a qualitative study investigating the process by which supervisors make difficult decisions in their assessment of trainee clinical psychologists. Following a grounded theory approach, seven supervisors were interviewed regarding their experiences of making difficult assessment decisions. The emergent model provides a representation of the complex interplay between contextual and personal processes involved in this process. Three core systems were identified following analysis of the data, namely cultural context, processes of assessment, and supervisor's perspective. The study findings are discussed with reference to existing research and policy, and key implications for training are identified. The critical review highlights some of the nuances of the context in which the research study was conducted, with the aim of informing others considering engaging in similar research. The review presents reflections on the impact of my previous experience in drawing me to study supervisory assessment processes, contextual factors of research, and the impacts on myself as the chief researcher.
3

Invisible diversity : exploring the experiences of trainee clinical psychologists from a mixed white ethnic background

Murat, Nermin Tulay January 2012 (has links)
There is limited research examining the identities and experiences of those from mixed ethnic backgrounds and the research literature is almost non-existent for those who are from a mixed white ethnic (MWE) background. The existent evidence base in regards to the experiences of clinical psychology training of those from minority ethnic groups is focused on Black and ethnic minority (BME) backgrounds. This study therefore aimed to gain insight into the experiences of trainee clinical psychologists from a mixed white ethnic background, raising awareness of these individuals and their needs in the clinical psychology training arena. This study adopted a qualitative approach where eight participants were recruited and in-depth semi-structured interviews conducted. Interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Three main themes emerged from participants’ accounts: ‘the double edged sword of invisible difference’, ‘uncovering the undercurrents of difference’ and ‘that which is sought and gained’. These findings are discussed in relation to the existing literature and clinical implications are presented. Methodological considerations and areas for future research are also considered. This study makes contribution to a sparsely researched area and provides rich insight into the experiences of trainee clinical psychologists from a MWE backgrounds. It is hoped the material presented here will encourage further thought, debate and study of this area.
4

Intra and interpersonal factors in the use of personal therapy by trainee clinical psychologists

Duncan, Amy Crystal January 2012 (has links)
The purpose of personal therapy for psychologists can be understood as a method of personal and professional development (PPD) and/or in terms of help-seeking. This study aims to consider differences in the use of personal therapy among trainee clinical psychologists. It used a cross-sectional, survey design and invited all British trainees to participate. 437 trainees (25% response rate) completed measures on intrapersonal and interpersonal variables, and answered several factual questions pertaining to demographics and clinically relevant experiences. Several trainees reported experiencing childhood abuse. A large proportion had experienced therapy prior to training. These issues were explored. Discriminant analyses demonstrated that attitude to therapy for PPD and psychological flexibility were important predictors of use of personal therapy, as was emotional neglect in childhood. The potential link between difficult early experience and ability to manage internal experience was considered. Therapeutic orientation of trainee, year of training and course support were also important factors in differentiating between groups. Implications for training and PPD were discussed in terms of suggestions for courses and trainees.

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