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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Trends in CT abdominal doses in Malaysian practices

Ali, Mohd. Hanafi. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (H. Sc. D.)--University of Sydney, 2005. / Title from title screen (viewed Mar. 1, 2007). Includes tables and questionnaires. Submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Health Sciences to the School of Medical Radiation Sciences. Includes bibliographical references. Also issued in print.
2

Trends in CT abdominal doses in Malaysian practices

Ali, Mohd. Hanafi January 2005 (has links)
Doctor of Health Science / An investigation of clinical Abdominal Computed Tomography (CT)dose, and associated clinical diagnostic protocols, has been ndertaken. This research was carried out to study the pattern of CT dose from routine abdominal examinations in Malaysian practices. From this study it is hoped to establish a Dose Reference Level (DRL) to assist in optimising radiation dose for CT abdominal examination in Malaysia
3

Trends in CT abdominal doses in Malaysian practices

Ali, Mohd. Hanafi January 2005 (has links)
Doctor of Health Science / An investigation of clinical Abdominal Computed Tomography (CT)dose, and associated clinical diagnostic protocols, has been ndertaken. This research was carried out to study the pattern of CT dose from routine abdominal examinations in Malaysian practices. From this study it is hoped to establish a Dose Reference Level (DRL) to assist in optimising radiation dose for CT abdominal examination in Malaysia

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