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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Perspectives on the use of medication in aging populations

Zubach, Lesya 07 April 2010 (has links)
This exploratory study is based on two assumptions. The first assumption is that the world we live in is socially constructed. The second assumption is that patient participation in healthcare decisions is essential. The patient, as the end-user of medications, needs to be involved in order to improve the quality of medication use. Despite increasing attention to geriatric pharmacotherapy, there is little information available concerning the older adults’ perspectives on the use of medications. Therefore, the aim of the study was to explore the attitudes and practices regarding medication use by two groups in the aging population: aging with a disability and aging into disability. A qualitative approach, using in-depth semi-structured interviews, was used. Ten individuals aged 65 years plus, who use five or more prescription and/or over-the-counter medication, and who reside in the community answered questions about their experiences using medication. These findings indicated that older adults’ expectations of their medications are grounded in the reality of their experiences, attitudes, beliefs and social or health care situations. The thematic framework developed from the data demonstrated that older adult’s perceptions of medication use linked to five themes through activities that helped them confirm or modify their perceptions. The five themes are: knowledge and experience, relationship with health care provider, drug management, attitude and impact of medical condition/or disability. It is hoped that this study will provide valuable knowledge of the unique concerns of the older adults in relation to the use of medication.
2

Perspectives on the use of medication in aging populations

Zubach, Lesya 07 April 2010 (has links)
This exploratory study is based on two assumptions. The first assumption is that the world we live in is socially constructed. The second assumption is that patient participation in healthcare decisions is essential. The patient, as the end-user of medications, needs to be involved in order to improve the quality of medication use. Despite increasing attention to geriatric pharmacotherapy, there is little information available concerning the older adults’ perspectives on the use of medications. Therefore, the aim of the study was to explore the attitudes and practices regarding medication use by two groups in the aging population: aging with a disability and aging into disability. A qualitative approach, using in-depth semi-structured interviews, was used. Ten individuals aged 65 years plus, who use five or more prescription and/or over-the-counter medication, and who reside in the community answered questions about their experiences using medication. These findings indicated that older adults’ expectations of their medications are grounded in the reality of their experiences, attitudes, beliefs and social or health care situations. The thematic framework developed from the data demonstrated that older adult’s perceptions of medication use linked to five themes through activities that helped them confirm or modify their perceptions. The five themes are: knowledge and experience, relationship with health care provider, drug management, attitude and impact of medical condition/or disability. It is hoped that this study will provide valuable knowledge of the unique concerns of the older adults in relation to the use of medication.
3

The C. elegans Lifespan Machine and its application to the temperature scaling of lifespan

Stroustrup, Nicholas Edward 08 June 2015 (has links)
Lifespan results from the complex interaction between genetic, environmental and stochastic factors, and therefore varies widely even among isogenic individuals. In C. elegans , the action of molecular mechanisms on aging can be inferred from their statistical effects on the distribution of lifespans within populations. However, such investigations are hindered by limitations in the methods available for collecting lifespan data. To enable the rapid collection of survival curves at any desired statistical resolution, we developed an automated platform for determining the lifespans of large populations of nematodes.
4

Walking cadence: A novel strategy to improve the proportion of inactive older adults who reach the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines

Slaght, Jana 12 August 2015 (has links)
Problem: Only 13% of older adults reach the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines (CPAG) aerobic activity recommendations. Walking cadence (steps per minute) is a strategy proposed to increase walking at the intensity recommended by the CPAG. Methods: Inactive older adults (N = 51) were instructed to walk 150 minutes per week at no specified intensity during phase 1 (6 weeks). In phase 2 (6 weeks), duration was maintained but the group one (N = 23) received instructions on how to reach moderate intensity, using a pedometer and individualized walking cadence, while group two (N = 22) did not. Results: During phase 1, MVPA time and MVPA in 10-minute bouts increased (p ≤ 0.05), and in phase 2 group one continued to increase MVPA time and time in MVPA in 10-minute bouts (p ≤ 0.01), while the group two significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.01). Discussion: Previously inactive older adults can improve time in MVPA in 10-minute bouts, as recommended by the CPAG, by using prescribed walking cadence, a pedometer to track moderate intensity, and practicing walking at this cadence. / October 2015
5

Factors related to aging well the influence of optimism, hardiness and spiritual well being on the physical health functioning of older adults /

Reinhoudt, Cynthia Wyatt. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Ohio State University, 2004. / Title from first page of PDF file. Document formatted into pages; contains xiii, 155 p.; also includes graphics (some col.) Includes bibliographical references (p. 127-141). Available online via OhioLINK's ETD Center
6

Reminiscence and the elderly an exploration of its contents, function, press and product /

Romaniuk, Michael. January 1978 (has links)
Thesis--Wisconsin. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 98-104).
7

The effects of enhancing self-concept of ability on intellectual performance of a group of elderly persons

Ismail, Maznah, January 1976 (has links)
Thesis--Wisconsin. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves [41]-46).
8

Semantic congruity and age comparisons; towards a theory of psychological age.

Oakley-McKeen, Kathryn J. (Kathryn Jill), Carleton University. Dissertation. Psychology. January 1992 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Carleton University, 1992. / Also available in electronic format on the Internet.
9

Being old in our society : health, functional status, and effects of research /

Strauss, Eva von, January 1900 (has links)
Diss. (sammanfattning) Stockholm : Karol. inst. / Härtill 5 uppsatser.
10

Surgical menopause and frailty risk in older community dwelling women: the study of osteoporotic fractures

Huang, Grace 06 November 2016 (has links)
BACKGROUND: Low testosterone levels in older women have been shown to be associated with frailty. Whether older postmenopausal women with a history of bilateral oophorectomy before natural menopause resulting in lower testosterone levels (surgical menopause) have higher risk for frailty is not known. This prospective study investigated whether women who had surgically-induced menopause had a greater risk of frailty than naturally menopausal women. Furthermore, we also determined whether lower serum testosterone levels would be associated with frailty in our study population of older postmenopausal women. METHODS: The sample included 7699 community-dwelling white women aged ≥ 65 years from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF). Participants were determined to have undergone surgical versus natural menopause based on whether or not they reported retrospectively having undergone a bilateral oophorectomy before or after menopause. Frailty status was classified as not frail, somewhat frail (hereafter referred to as Intermediate stage), frail or death at four interviews, conducted 6-18 years post-baseline. Baseline serum total testosterone concentrations were available on a subset of 541 participants. RESULTS: Approximately 12.6% of the participants reported surgical menopause. A total of 39.7% were classified as somewhat frail (intermediate stage) and 10.1% as frail. Twenty-two (22.0%) of the participants died during the interview period when frailty was assessed. Mean age at baseline was 71.2 years. Total serum testosterone levels were significantly lower among surgically menopausal women compared to naturally menopausal women (p<0.01). Surgical menopause was not significantly associated with an increased risk of frailty (Odds Ratio=0.94; 95% CI=0.72-1.22), intermediate stage frailty (Odds Ratio=0.96; 95% CI=0.80-1.10) or death (Odds Ratio=1.17 ; 95% CI=0.97-1.42) after adjusting for age, BMI and number of IADL impairments. Stratified analyses showed that oral estrogen use did not modify these associations. CONCLUSION: Among postmenopausal women, surgical menopause was not associated with a higher risk for frailty compared to naturally menopausal women, even in the absence of estrogen therapy. Future prospective studies are needed to investigate hormonal mechanisms involved in the development of frailty in older postmenopausal women. / 2017-11-05T00:00:00Z

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