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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Bioremediation and its potential in Hong Kong /

Yuen, Tak-shing, Rupert. January 1994 (has links)
Thesis (M. Sc.)--University of Hong Kong, 1994. / Includes bibliographical references.
2

Analysis of protistan grazing on bioremediative bacteria using in vivo fluorescent protein expression and flow cytometry /

Fu, Yutao, January 2002 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.) in Biochemistry--University of Maine, 2002. / Includes vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 58-62).
3

Protein extraction from sediment bound microbes capable of bioremediation for proteomic studies

Nicora, Carrie Diana, January 2009 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S. in environmental science)--Washington State University, August 2009. / Title from PDF title page (viewed on Aug. 7, 2009). "School of Earth and Environmental Sciences." Includes bibliographical references (p. 85-94).
4

In-situ monitoring of microbial activity and biodegradation during solute transport in porous media

Yolcubal, Irfan. January 2001 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D - Hydrology and Water Resources) - University of Arizona. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 259-280).
5

Elucidation and exploitation of multi species gene pools underpinning selected environmental biotechnologies

Senior, Eric January 2000 (has links)
No description available.
6

Bioremediation and its potential in Hong Kong

Yuen, Tak-shing, Rupert., 袁德成. January 1994 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Environmental Management / Master / Master of Science in Environmental Management
7

Assessment of bacterial communities and an iron-reducing bacterium in relation to an engineered bioremediation system designed for the treatment of uranium-nitric acid contaminated groundwater

Hwang, Chiachi. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Miami University, Dept. of Microbiology, 2009. / Title from second page of PDF document. Includes bibliographical references (p. 195-218).
8

Effects of pore-scale velocity and pore-scale physical processes on contaminant biodegradation during transport in groundwater: modeling and experiments

Mendoza Sanchez, Itza 10 October 2008 (has links)
Contamination of surface and ground water has emerged as one of the most important environmental issues in developed and developing countries. Bioremediation of groundwater takes advantage of bacteria present in the environment to transform toxic compounds to non-toxic metabolites. This biotechnology holds the potential for fast, inexpensive, and effective water decontamination. However, it is still poorly understood and usually not fully controlled due to the lack of information describing the natural phenomena involved. Therefore, a better understanding of the phenomena involved during bioremediation of groundwater could help in the design and implementation of more efficient technologies. The main objective of the present research is to assess how pore-scale physical factors, such as pore-scale velocity, affect the degradation potential of contaminants during transport in groundwater. The target chemicals studied were chlorinated ethenes because they are commonly found in contaminated groundwater sites. To achieve the research objective, the following were employed: a mathematical model that links pore scale processes to the macro-scale representation of contaminant transport; development of numerical tools to solve the mathematical model; and experimental elucidation of the influence of pore-scale flow velocity on the biodegradation of contaminants using column experiments. Results from the mathematical model and experiments were used to elucidate the inter-relationship between physical and biological phenomena at the micro scale. The influence of flow velocity through the porous media (a physical factor) on the biological structure (microbial community in the porous media) was assessed. The results of this investigation contribute to the bioremediation of contaminated groundwater understanding with new insights on the importance of physical transport factors on the biodegradation potential. For example, flow velocity is shown to have an important effect on the degradation potential of chlorinated ethenes. Additionally, the mathematical model and numerical tools have potential application to many other reactive transport problems, including: adsorption onto activated carbon, reaction in packed beds of catalyst, chemical transport in streambeds, and separation in chromatographic columns.
9

Cyanide-degrading enzymes for bioremediation

Basile, Lacy Jamel 10 October 2008 (has links)
Cyanide-containing waste is an increasingly prevalent problem in today's society. There are many applications that utilize cyanide, such as gold mining and electroplating, and these processes produce cyanide waste with varying conditions. Remediation of this waste is necessary to prevent contamination of soils and water. While there are a variety of processes being used, bioremediation is potentially a more cost effective alternative. A variety of fungal species are known to degrade cyanide through the action of cyanide hydratases, a specialized subset of nitrilases which hydrolyze cyanide to formamide. Here I report on previously unknown and uncharacterized nitrilases from Neurospora crassa, Gibberella zeae, and Aspergillus nidulans. Recombinant forms of four cyanide hydratases from N. crassa, A. nidulans, G. zeae, and Gloeocercospora sorghi were prepared after their genes were cloned with N-terminal hexahistidine purification tags, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. These enzymes were compared according to their relative specific activity, pH activity profiles, thermal stability, and ability to degrade cyanide in the presence of high concentrations of copper and silver. Although all four were relatively similar, the N. crassa cyanide hydratase (CHT) has the greatest thermal stability and widest pH range where activity remained above 50%. N. crassa also demonstrated the highest rate of cyanide degradation in the presence of both metals tested. The CHT of A. nidulans and N. crassa have the highest reaction rate of the four fungal nitrilases evaluated in this work. These data help determine optimization conditions for the possible use of these enzymes in the bioremediation of cyanide-containing waste. Similar to known plant pathogenic fungi, in vivo expression of CHT in both N. crassa and A. nidulans were induced by growth in the presence of KCN (potassium cyanide).
10

Effects of pore-scale velocity and pore-scale physical processes on contaminant biodegradation during transport in groundwater: modeling and experiments

Mendoza Sanchez, Itza 15 May 2009 (has links)
Contamination of surface and ground water has emerged as one of the most important environmental issues in developed and developing countries. Bioremediation of groundwater takes advantage of bacteria present in the environment to transform toxic compounds to non-toxic metabolites. This biotechnology holds the potential for fast, inexpensive, and effective water decontamination. However, it is still poorly understood and usually not fully controlled due to the lack of information describing the natural phenomena involved. Therefore, a better understanding of the phenomena involved during bioremediation of groundwater could help in the design and implementation of more efficient technologies. The main objective of the present research is to assess how pore-scale physical factors, such as pore-scale velocity, affect the degradation potential of contaminants during transport in groundwater. The target chemicals studied were chlorinated ethenes because they are commonly found in contaminated groundwater sites. To achieve the research objective, the following were employed: a mathematical model that links pore scale processes to the macro-scale representation of contaminant transport; development of numerical tools to solve the mathematical model; and experimental elucidation of the influence of pore-scale flow velocity on the biodegradation of contaminants using column experiments. Results from the mathematical model and experiments were used to elucidate the inter-relationship between physical and biological phenomena at the micro scale. The influence of flow velocity through the porous media (a physical factor) on the biological structure (microbial community in the porous media) was assessed. The results of this investigation contribute to the bioremediation of contaminated groundwater understanding with new insights on the importance of physical transport factors on the biodegradation potential. For example, flow velocity is shown to have an important effect on the degradation potential of chlorinated ethenes. Additionally, the mathematical model and numerical tools have potential application to many other reactive transport problems, including: adsorption onto activated carbon, reaction in packed beds of catalyst, chemical transport in streambeds, and separation in chromatographic columns.

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