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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Osmo-convective drying behavior of blueberries

Nsonzi, Frances. January 1997 (has links)
The kinetics of moisture loss and solids gain during osmotic dehydration of blueberries under different conditions of temperature (37--60°C), concentration of the sucrose solution (47--70°Brix) and contact time between fruit and sucrose solution (0.5--5.5 h) were studied, and modeled based on Fick's law of unsteady state diffusion. The rates of moisture loss and solids gain were also related to temperature and sucrose concentration. / The second stage convective drying behavior of osmo-dehydrated blueberries was evaluated in a forced air cabinet dryer (temperature: 50°C, relative humidity: 14%, air velocity: 0.6 m/s) with a cross-flow tray arrangement. Osmotic dehydration pre-treatments included different combinations of temperature, sucrose concentration and contact time. Fick's second law of unsteady state diffusion was used to model the air drying kinetics. / The quality of two-stage osmo-convective dried blueberries with respect to color, texture and rehydration ratio was evaluated. The parameters analyzed for color were the total color difference (DeltaE) and, the (a/b) ratio as the indicator for the red-blue color. The texture analysis included evaluation of the hardness, chewiness and stickiness of the osmo-convective dried blueberries. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)
2

Osmo-convective drying behavior of blueberries

Nsonzi, Frances. January 1997 (has links)
No description available.
3

Combined osmotic and microwave drying of strawberries and blueberries

Venkatachalapathy, Kamadenahally. January 1998 (has links)
This work was aimed at obtaining high quality dried strawberries using microwaves to assist convection air of 2 m/s at 30--45°C. Preliminary trials with whole strawberries were unsuccessful. Fruits would cook rather than dry at low microwave power levels, and burst at higher powers. This was due to the inhibition of moisture movement by the waxy cuticle. Slice and pureed strawberries dried, but were of lower quality than freeze-dried / A treatment consisting of dipping the berries in a solution of ethyl oleate and sodium hydroxide was studied. Such treatments are used in industry to reduce the skin resistance to moisture diffusion. Result showed that the treatment greatly enhanced the drying rates of whole berries in convection and microwave regimes. A 1% concentration of ethyl oleate was sufficient for maximum reduction of drying time, and it is possible that even lower concentrations could be used for strawberries. Rehydration was similar to that of the dipped and freeze-dried samples, but the microwaved samples were a bit softer, and had less aroma, colour and flavour. / Osmotic dehydration was then studied as a technique of binding flavours and aromas and of reducing the time required for finish drying with microwaves. These studies were performed on strawberries and blueberries. Results showed berries that were dipped and then osmotically dehydrated for 24 h in sucrose, yielded a microwave-dried final product that was equal to the freeze-dried one in terms of quality, and this, with a much lower time for finish drying. / The shrinkage ratio of strawberries has a straight line relation to the moisture ratio. The reduction in equivalent diameter is well-described by a reciprocal logarithmic function. / The results of these major aspects of the research suggest that microwave-drying could be a viable and more rapid alternative to freeze-drying when berries are first subjected to a pretreatement of ethyl oleate and partial dehydration by osmosis. It was also found that if microwave energy is applied in continuous mode, the initial applied power should not exceed 0.2 W g--1, otherwise burning may occur. It is also recommended that osmotic dehydration be limited to not much longer than 24 hours, since off-odours, develop. The results apply to convective regimes with inlet air temperatures of 45°C and inlet velocity of 2 m/s.
4

Combined osmotic and microwave drying of strawberries and blueberries

Venkatachalapathy, Kamadenahally. January 1998 (has links)
No description available.

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