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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The healing of composite endochondral bone grafts: a qualitative and quantitative analysis

李國培, Lie Ken Jie, Ronny Ket Phoei. January 1995 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Dentistry / Master / Master of Dental Surgery
2

The healing of composite endochondral bone grafts a qualitative and quantitative analysis /

Lie Ken Jie, Ronny Ket Phoei. January 1995 (has links)
Thesis (M.D.S.)--University of Hong Kong, 1995. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 53-74) Also available in print.
3

The expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase during the early stages of bone graft healing

Twitty, Anne. January 2000 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Dentistry / Doctoral / Doctor of Philosophy
4

Characterisation of bone defect models in immunodeficient animals

Gan, Jade Ho Yue, School of Biomedical Engineering, UNSW January 2005 (has links)
Bone defects resulting from non-unions, fractures, significant revision joint replacements, tumour resection and osteolysis present a clinical problem. While autografts are considered the gold standard, ubiquitous use of this reparative technique is limited by graft supply and site morbidity. Recent progresses in tissue engineering using stem cells, bone enhancing molecules and gene therapy have provided more hypotheses for bone defect treatment. In vivo assessment to test these hypotheses requires animal models to mimic human conditions. Immunodeficient or nude animals have the advantage of hosting materials from human and other xenographic origins without immuno-intolerance or rejection. A thorough understanding of the biology in nude animals is vital for the further advancement of connective tissue healing and regeneration strategies. Nude mice are excellent xenographic hosts for in- vivo characterisation and provide a reproducible animal source. The immune deficiencies of nude compared to normal animals may however, influence bone healing and need to be addressed. This dissertation (a) investigated potential bone defect models in nude mice and nude rats (b) incorporated the selected bone defect model to evaluate the effect of T cell deficiency and age on bone defect healing in nude animals (c) determined the feasibility of a critical size defect (CSD) in nude mice. A distal-femur-condylar-defect (DFCD) model was successfully performed in nude mice and rats. The model was found to have some advantages as a bone defect model: (1) located at a weight-bearing skeletal site (2) no requirements for an internal or external fixator (3) does not obstruct or limit mobility (4) location is not in close proximity to any major organs such as the brain (5) easy identification of surface anatomy (6) defect size is standardised and reproducible (7) does not require lengthy and complicated surgery and (8) cost effective. This dissertation confirmed that bone healing in nude mice is similar to that of normal immunocompetent mice. Absence of T lymphocytes did not delay or inhibit bone repair. Use of older nude mice did not seem to affect the healing rate, in contrast to older normal mice, which showed delay in bone healing in the initial phase. Establishment of critical sized defects in mice at a weight-bearing location was not feasible due to the robust healing of murine. This dissertation recommends that the DFCD model could be utilized for the assessment of xenogenic materials at early time point.
5

The morbidity of anterior iliac bone harvesting for maxillofacial grafting procedures

Hui, Hin-ming. January 1998 (has links)
Thesis (M.D.S.)--University of Hong Kong, 1998. / Includes bibliographical references. Also available in print.
6

Characterisation of bone defect models in immunodeficient animals

Gan, Jade Ho Yue, School of Biomedical Engineering, UNSW January 2005 (has links)
Bone defects resulting from non-unions, fractures, significant revision joint replacements, tumour resection and osteolysis present a clinical problem. While autografts are considered the gold standard, ubiquitous use of this reparative technique is limited by graft supply and site morbidity. Recent progresses in tissue engineering using stem cells, bone enhancing molecules and gene therapy have provided more hypotheses for bone defect treatment. In vivo assessment to test these hypotheses requires animal models to mimic human conditions. Immunodeficient or nude animals have the advantage of hosting materials from human and other xenographic origins without immuno-intolerance or rejection. A thorough understanding of the biology in nude animals is vital for the further advancement of connective tissue healing and regeneration strategies. Nude mice are excellent xenographic hosts for in- vivo characterisation and provide a reproducible animal source. The immune deficiencies of nude compared to normal animals may however, influence bone healing and need to be addressed. This dissertation (a) investigated potential bone defect models in nude mice and nude rats (b) incorporated the selected bone defect model to evaluate the effect of T cell deficiency and age on bone defect healing in nude animals (c) determined the feasibility of a critical size defect (CSD) in nude mice. A distal-femur-condylar-defect (DFCD) model was successfully performed in nude mice and rats. The model was found to have some advantages as a bone defect model: (1) located at a weight-bearing skeletal site (2) no requirements for an internal or external fixator (3) does not obstruct or limit mobility (4) location is not in close proximity to any major organs such as the brain (5) easy identification of surface anatomy (6) defect size is standardised and reproducible (7) does not require lengthy and complicated surgery and (8) cost effective. This dissertation confirmed that bone healing in nude mice is similar to that of normal immunocompetent mice. Absence of T lymphocytes did not delay or inhibit bone repair. Use of older nude mice did not seem to affect the healing rate, in contrast to older normal mice, which showed delay in bone healing in the initial phase. Establishment of critical sized defects in mice at a weight-bearing location was not feasible due to the robust healing of murine. This dissertation recommends that the DFCD model could be utilized for the assessment of xenogenic materials at early time point.
7

Characterisation of bone defect models in immunodeficient animals

Gan, Jade Ho Yue, School of Biomedical Engineering, UNSW January 2005 (has links)
Bone defects resulting from non-unions, fractures, significant revision joint replacements, tumour resection and osteolysis present a clinical problem. While autografts are considered the gold standard, ubiquitous use of this reparative technique is limited by graft supply and site morbidity. Recent progresses in tissue engineering using stem cells, bone enhancing molecules and gene therapy have provided more hypotheses for bone defect treatment. In vivo assessment to test these hypotheses requires animal models to mimic human conditions. Immunodeficient or nude animals have the advantage of hosting materials from human and other xenographic origins without immuno-intolerance or rejection. A thorough understanding of the biology in nude animals is vital for the further advancement of connective tissue healing and regeneration strategies. Nude mice are excellent xenographic hosts for in- vivo characterisation and provide a reproducible animal source. The immune deficiencies of nude compared to normal animals may however, influence bone healing and need to be addressed. This dissertation (a) investigated potential bone defect models in nude mice and nude rats (b) incorporated the selected bone defect model to evaluate the effect of T cell deficiency and age on bone defect healing in nude animals (c) determined the feasibility of a critical size defect (CSD) in nude mice. A distal-femur-condylar-defect (DFCD) model was successfully performed in nude mice and rats. The model was found to have some advantages as a bone defect model: (1) located at a weight-bearing skeletal site (2) no requirements for an internal or external fixator (3) does not obstruct or limit mobility (4) location is not in close proximity to any major organs such as the brain (5) easy identification of surface anatomy (6) defect size is standardised and reproducible (7) does not require lengthy and complicated surgery and (8) cost effective. This dissertation confirmed that bone healing in nude mice is similar to that of normal immunocompetent mice. Absence of T lymphocytes did not delay or inhibit bone repair. Use of older nude mice did not seem to affect the healing rate, in contrast to older normal mice, which showed delay in bone healing in the initial phase. Establishment of critical sized defects in mice at a weight-bearing location was not feasible due to the robust healing of murine. This dissertation recommends that the DFCD model could be utilized for the assessment of xenogenic materials at early time point.
8

The expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase during the early stages of bone graft healing

Twitty, Anne. January 2000 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Hong Kong, 2000. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 131-154) Also available in print.
9

The effect of demineralized intramembranous bone matrix on the healingof autogenous bone grafts

Wong, Wing-kit, Ricky., 黃永傑. January 1999 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Dentistry / Master / Master of Orthodontics
10

Bone induction of demineralized intramembranous and endochondral bone matrices

黃美娟, Wong May-kuen, Alice. January 1999 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Dentistry / Master / Master of Orthodontics

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