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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Coherent heteronuclear spin dynamics in an ultracold spinor mixture / 超冷旋量混合物中的異核間相干自旋動力學 / CUHK electronic theses & dissertations collection / Coherent heteronuclear spin dynamics in an ultracold spinor mixture / Chao leng xuan liang hun he wu zhong de yi he jian xiang gan zi xuan dong li xue

January 2015 (has links)
Li, Xiaoke = 超冷旋量混合物中的異核間相干自旋動力學 / 李小科. / Thesis Ph.D. Chinese University of Hong Kong 2015. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 126-142). / Abstracts also in Chinese. / Title from PDF title page (viewed on 25, October, 2016). / Li, Xiaoke = Chao leng xuan liang hun he wu zhong de yi he jian xiang gan zi xuan dong li xue / Li Xiaoke.
2

A classical field treatment of colliding Bose-Einstein condensates

Norrie, Adam Anson, n/a January 2005 (has links)
In this thesis we develop a fully quantum-mechanical treatment of collisions between distinct atomic Bose-Einstein condensate wavepackets, with particular emphasis on the incoherently scattered atoms that form s-wave haloes around the condensate wavepackets. Previous theoretical treatments of these systems have been unable to account simultaneously for both the evolution of the halo and the depletion of the condensates, and were therefore restricted to the small scattering limit. Our approach uses the truncated Wigner method, a particular example of the classical field methods familiar from quantum optics. The atomic field is restricted to a low-energy subspace of single-particle states, and the method is applicable even to highly-scattered systems. We present a comprehensive derivation of the truncated Wigner method for ultracold bosonic fields, and discuss in detail the validity regime of the Wigner truncation for inhomogeneous multimode systems. The method gives rise to a set of coupled stochastic differential equations that describe the evolution of a single realisation of the atomic field, and have a form similar to that of the well known Gross-Pitaevskii equation, but with the important difference that the stochastic differential equations include well prescribed quantum fluctuations. To propagate our systems we develop algorithms that allow for highly efficient numerical evolution of realistic experimental collisions. By investigating individual trajectories of the colliding system, we find that the scattering halo is composed of many distinct highly-populated phase grains separated by large numbers of vortices, a behaviour we label quantum turbulence. We develop a spatial averaging method for approximately calculating quantum correlation functions from a single trajectory, and calculate various properties of the halo. Based on these results, we propose a mechanism to explain the observed features of scattering halo formation. We find by using an appropriately extended truncated Wigner approach that three-body recombination events have negligible effect on the collisions. Using an ensemble of trajectories we calculate correlation functions of a particular collisional system to give a rigorous characterisation of the quantum statistics of the field, and obtain results that are remarkably similar to those obtained using single trajectory spatial averaging. For global field quantities, such as the total coherent population, we find that accurate estimates can be achieved using just two trajectories, a result we use to efficiently explore the dependence of the system on key physical parameters. Finally, we apply the truncated Wigner method to collisions between condensates in differing hyperfine states, whose (single-trajectory and ensemble) behaviour we find is qualitatively similar to that of single-component collisions.
3

Nonlinear dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates : semiclassical and quantum /

Salmond, Grant Leonard. January 2002 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M. Sc.)--University of Queensland, 2002. / Includes bibliographical references.
4

Instability in a cold atom interferometer

Pulido, Daniel. January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Worcester Polytechnic Institute. / Keywords: interferometry; bose-einstein condensation. Includes bibliographical references (p. 49-50).
5

Single impurities in a Bose-Einstein condensate

Palzer, Stefan January 2010 (has links)
No description available.
6

Persistent currents in Bose-Einstein condensates

Moulder, Stuart January 2013 (has links)
No description available.
7

Properties of trapped dipolar condensates

Yi, Su 05 1900 (has links)
No description available.
8

Entanglement and spin squeezing of bose condensed atoms

Zhang, Mei 05 1900 (has links)
No description available.
9

Realization of Bose-Einstein Condensation of 87Rb in a Time-orbiting Potential Trap

Siercke, Mirco 13 June 2011 (has links)
The construction of an apparatus capable of producing Bose-Einstein condensates marks a significant milestone in every experimental cold atom laboratory. In this thesis I describe the development of a system to create a Bose-Einstein condensate of $^{87}Rb$ in a Time-Orbiting Potential trap. I review the optical and magnetic techniques required to trap and cool an atomic sample under vacuum, motivating our decision to build a double MOT system comprised of a high-pressure ($10^{-9}$ torr) chamber to gather atoms and a low-pressure ($10^{-11}$ torr) chamber to cool atoms to degeneracy. By theoretically modeling the atom number and temperature inside the magnetic trap during evaporative cooling I demonstrate a simple approach to determining a cooling path that reaches the transition temperature. By making use of the condensates produced under these non-optimized conditions I determine the heating rate of the condensate in the TOP trap to be $300$ nK/s. I further use the condensates to make a more precise measurement of the TOP trap bias field. I improve upon the conventional evaporation path used in TOP trap experiments by introducing and optimizing additional bias field compression stages in between RF evaporation ramps. I demonstrate how, by adding these additional stages, the system is capable of reaching the BEC phase transition with a final atom number of $2\times 10^{5}$. In contrast, RF evaporation after only a single bias field ramp has yielded condensates with only $30\times 10^3$ atoms.
10

Realization of Bose-Einstein Condensation of 87Rb in a Time-orbiting Potential Trap

Siercke, Mirco 13 June 2011 (has links)
The construction of an apparatus capable of producing Bose-Einstein condensates marks a significant milestone in every experimental cold atom laboratory. In this thesis I describe the development of a system to create a Bose-Einstein condensate of $^{87}Rb$ in a Time-Orbiting Potential trap. I review the optical and magnetic techniques required to trap and cool an atomic sample under vacuum, motivating our decision to build a double MOT system comprised of a high-pressure ($10^{-9}$ torr) chamber to gather atoms and a low-pressure ($10^{-11}$ torr) chamber to cool atoms to degeneracy. By theoretically modeling the atom number and temperature inside the magnetic trap during evaporative cooling I demonstrate a simple approach to determining a cooling path that reaches the transition temperature. By making use of the condensates produced under these non-optimized conditions I determine the heating rate of the condensate in the TOP trap to be $300$ nK/s. I further use the condensates to make a more precise measurement of the TOP trap bias field. I improve upon the conventional evaporation path used in TOP trap experiments by introducing and optimizing additional bias field compression stages in between RF evaporation ramps. I demonstrate how, by adding these additional stages, the system is capable of reaching the BEC phase transition with a final atom number of $2\times 10^{5}$. In contrast, RF evaporation after only a single bias field ramp has yielded condensates with only $30\times 10^3$ atoms.

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