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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

An experimental and theoretical study of the electronic states of caffeine

Kikkert, John Nicolaas January 1971 (has links)
154 leaves : ill. ; 26 cm. / Title page, contents and abstract only. The complete thesis in print form is available from the University Library. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Adelaide, Dept. of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, 1972
2

An experimental and theoretical study of the electronic states of caffeine

Kikkert, John Nicolaas January 1971 (has links)
154 leaves : ill. ; 26 cm. / Title page, contents and abstract only. The complete thesis in print form is available from the University Library. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Adelaide, Dept. of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, 1972
3

Influence of perceived caffeine ingestion upon submaximal exercise to exhaustion /

Kerner, Wendy J. January 1989 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin -- La Crosse, 1989. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 37-39).
4

An experimental and theoretical study of the electronic states of caffeine.

Kikkert, John Nicolaas. January 1971 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph.D.) -- University of Adelaide, Dept. of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, 1972.
5

The effect of caffeine on people's ability to process and discount a persuasive message /

Scott, Sarah A. January 2002 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (B. Psy. Sc.(Hons.))--University of Queensland, 2002. / Includes bibliographical references.
6

Analyzing limitations in exposure estimates based on self-reported dietary intake of caffeinated beverages in the Baltimore-Washington infant study, 1981-1989

Daniel, Johnni H. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.Ph.)--Georgia State University, 2007. / Title from file title page. Derek Shendell, committee chair; Ike Okosun, Adolfo Correa, Jan Cragan, committee members. Electronic text (61 p.) : digital, PDF file. Description based on contents viewed June 4, 2008. Includes bibliographical references (p. 41-42).
7

Adenosine receptors : pharmacology and adaptive change.

January 1986 (has links)
Cheung Wing Tai. / Bibliography: leaves 133-143 / Thesis (M.Ph.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1986
8

Effect of an energy drink on physical and cognitive performance in trained cyclists

Lassiter, David Gray 03 December 2013 (has links)
This study investigated the effectiveness of an energy drink (ED) in enhancing cycling time-trial performance, and cognitive performance at rest, during moderate-intensity exercise, and after exercise. The protocol was double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, two-period, and within-subjects. The treatments were ED containing caffeine and carbohydrate, and a caffeine-free non-caloric flavored placebo beverage (PLA). Exercise performance was measured by time to finish a simulated 35 km time-trial course. Cognitive performance was measured by a Stroop task, a tapping task, a reaction time task, and an executive function task consisting of both tapping and reaction time. The effects of ED on blood markers were also assessed. Race performance was enhanced by an average of 3% when participants had ED compared to PLA without a difference in rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Performance was improved by ED even in participants that arrived to the lab with elevated blood caffeine concentrations. Both before and after the exercise, ED resulted in more taps per second in the tapping task. After receiving ED, plasma insulin spiked, there was a fall in free fatty acids (FFA) and blood glucose remained unchanged. Exercise onset caused a drop in blood glucose when participants consumed ED, though glucose returned to a level that was not different from PLA by 29 km into the race. FFA also increased as the exercise continued, and were not different from PLA by 23 km. ED elevated plasma caffeine levels. Epinephrine was elevated due to ED from 6 km to the end of the race. Norepinephrine was only elevated by ED at 6 km. At rest and throughout exercise ED caused elevated lactate concentrations. When participants consumed ED they sustained a greater VO₂ and heart rate throughout the race. In summary, ED enhanced exercise performance and simple movement time as assessed by the tap test before and after intense exercise. There was enough caffeine in ED to enhance physical performance without causing negative effects on cognitive function. / text
9

The effect of caffeine ingestion on tennis skill performance and hydration status

Strecker, Estevam, January 2007 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S.)--Auburn University, 2007. / Abstract. Vita. Includes bibliographic references (ℓ. 98-108)
10

The effect of caffeine on distance running performance /

Kasper, Mark J. January 1986 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S.)--Eastern Illinois University. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 29-30).

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