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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The future of fully automated vehicles : opportunities for vehicle- and ride-sharing, with cost and emissions savings

Fagnant, Daniel James 17 September 2014 (has links)
Fully automated or autonomous vehicles (AVs) hold great promise for the future of transportation, with Google and other auto manufacturers intending on introducing self-driving cars to the public by 2020. New automation functionalities will produce dramatic transportation system changes, across safety, mobility, travel behavior, and the built environment. This work’s results indicate that AVs may save the U.S. economy up to $37.7 billion from safety, mobility and parking improvements at the 10% market penetration level (in terms of system-wide vehicle-miles traveled [VMT]), and up to $447.1 billion with 90% market penetration. With only 10% market share, over 1,000 lives could be saved annually. However, realizing these potential benefits while avoiding pitfalls requires overcoming significant barriers including AV costs, liability, security, privacy, and missing research. Additionally, once fully self-driving vehicles can safely and legally drive unoccupied, a new personal travel transportation mode looks set to arrive. This new mode is the shared automated vehicle (SAV), combining on-demand service features with self-driving capabilities. This work simulates a fleet of SAVs operating within Austin, Texas, first using an idealized grid-based representation, and next using Austin’s actual transportation network and travel demand flows. This second model incorporates dynamic ride-sharing (DRS), allowing two or more travelers with similar origins, destinations and departure times to share a ride. Model results indicate that each SAV could replace around 10 conventionally-owned household vehicles while serving over 56,000 person-trips. SAVs’ ability to relocate unoccupied between serving one traveler and the next may cause an increase of 7-10% more travel; however, DRS can result in reduced overall VMT, given enough SAV-using travelers willing to ride-share. Furthermore, using DRS results in overall lower wait and service times for travelers, particularly from pooling rides during peak demand. SAVs should produce favorable emissions outcomes, with an estimated 16% less energy use and 48% lower volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, per person-trip compared to conventional vehicles. Finally, assuming SAVs cost $70,000 each, an SAV fleet in Austin could provide a 19% return on investment, when charging $1 per trip-mile served. In summary, this new paradigm holds much promise that technological advances may soon realized. / text
2

Modelling shared vehicle system design and operation using discrete-event simulation technique /

Hossain, Md. Akhtar, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.) - Carleton University, 2006. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 256-262). Also available in electronic format on the Internet.
3

Car Sharing as a Potential for Development of Individual Transport in Czech Republic / Car Sharing as a Potential for Development of Individual Transport in Czech Republic

Husnajová, Nicol January 2015 (has links)
This master thesis deals with the unique idea of sharing vehicles called car sharing. Thesis is divided into two parts, theoretical and practical. Theoretical part describes the basic concept of car sharing as a concept of a new development of a lifestyle spread around the world. Car sharing is described as a source of new ecological and convenient way of transport. This paper looks at the history behind the carsharing, car sharing organizations model as part of different forms of carsharing, as well as benefits and environmental effects that are associated with this revelation. It describes a view of this concept in different countries in Europe and in the US. Focus is then made on the situation in Czech republic, more specifically on the first carsharing company Autonapul on the czech market. Practical part emphasizes carsharing situation in Czech republic, providing list of different car companies on the market. It looks at situation in the capital city, Prague, and suggests the new marketing strategy for the oldest company.
4

Would you share a car? : A qualitative study on the factors affecting consumer participation in car-sharing systems.

Bemmouna, Asmae, Alyousif, Hedaya January 2020 (has links)
The sharing economy is an evolving economic model that is based on collaboration and sharing access to goods with other people. A leading example of this are car-sharing services, which allow people who are strangers to each other to access a car in return of a fee. Although these services are widely spreading across the globe, there is still a short understanding of the customer motives and barriers to engage in these services. The purpose of this thesis was to explore the factors that affect customer participation in carsharing services including motives and barriers. The study was designed to test and modify an adapted conceptual framework through conducting an abductive qualitative study in the form of semi-structured in-depth interviews with a total of 18 interviewees. The empirical findings of the study suggest that there is a total of 14 relevant factors affecting consumer participation in sharing services: 3 factors were related to consumption trends, 7 factors were identified as motives and 4 as barriers. Among all of these factors, economic motivations were recognized to be the most critical factor for customers. The results of this study are highly relevant to companies which operate car-sharing services when considering customer needs and demands.
5

Modelling Effects of Car Sharing on Travel Behaviour

Söder, Isabelle January 2019 (has links)
Shared modes of transport, including car sharing, have been pointed out as one way of reducing private car use, contributing to an efficient transportation system that fulfills societal and environmental goals.Previous studies show that a share of car sharing users sells or refrains from acquire a new vehicle, when entering car sharing. Also, on average, car sharing has been shown to reduce Vehicle Kilometers Traveled (VKT) by car among the users.This study is conducted in three parts. First, a literature review of the effects of car sharing on travel behavior and car ownership is presented. Second, an implementation of car sharing in an existing transport model is described and the estimated effects are analyzed in relation to the findings in the literature study. In the final part, the car sharing module is reformulated to model a station-based car sharing system, where the distances to car sharing vehicles are used to distribute the effect of car sharing on car ownership spatially.This work contributes to the field by connecting the results from previous research about car sharing with practical transport modelling. The model of the station-based car sharing system is a useful tool for planners when considering the placement of car sharing stations. Also, this study provides an updated literature review covering findings of the effects of car sharing on travel behaviour and car ownership.Keywords: car sharing, station-based car sharing, travel demand modelling, vehicle ownership modelling, four-step model
6

User-centered Service Design for Sustainable Mobility Innovations : Mapping Users’ Needs and Service Requirements for Electric Car Sharing Service Design

Sopjani, Liridona January 2015 (has links)
Electric car sharing is gradually expanding as an innovative and more sustainable mobility alternative to private cars. Though, the use of such mobility service has not yet reached the desired levels worldwide despite attracting large number of customers. For car sharing operators, thus, it is imperative to understand the users and their needs beyond the existing demographics and quantitative data in order to design more desirable and useful services that expand customer acceptance and usage rate of such alternative. This thesis is an exploratory study about users’ needs, behaviors, and experiences toward electric car sharing and the service requirements resulting from these dimensions. Using user- centered service design approach, the study focuses in obtaining qualitative insights about users through workshops with focus groups in regards to LEV-pool, a research project that intends to field test a new approach to car sharing by offering small size electric vehicles for local mobility at a large workplace. Based on three user-centered service design methods: customer journey map, personas, and stakeholder map, a visual mapping of users, their needs, behaviors, and experiences, and service requirements is developed. The findings point at different user types with distinct purposes of using car sharing, whose needs for mobility (at work) are affected by external factors such as work activities and job occupation. Their mobility behavior differs in terms of how they interact with car sharing service and is partly influenced by the service offering. In general, users show various experiences toward car sharing systems, and many relate it to technical aspects of the service. In terms of service requirements, the results highlight available vehicles at the needed time, simple and easy booking system with many features responsive to users’ needs, maintenance and cleanliness of vehicles, effective communication of service offering, and simple pricing schemes. The underlying user dimensions explored show as relevant in shaping the users’ evaluation of a service and their decision to use a certain mobility alternative. / Electric car sharing offers a more sustainable mobility alternative to private cars. Though, the use of this service has not yet reached the desired levels worldwide despite attracting large number of customers. For car sharing operators, thus, it is imperative to understand the users and their needs in order to design more desirable and useful electric car sharing services. This thesis is an exploratory study of the users and the service of electric car sharing systems. Using user-centered service design approach, the study focuses in obtaining qualitative insights about users in regards to LEV-pool –a research project that intends to field test a new approach to car sharing by offering small size electric vehicles for local mobility at a large workplace. The study applies three user centered service design methods to capture and present a holistic understanding of users, their needs, behaviors, and experiences toward electric car sharing and the service requirements resulting from these dimensions. The findings suggest that users are distinct and have different needs for mobility (at work), which are shaped by the external factors such as work activities and job occupation. Their mobility behavior differs in terms of how they interact with car sharing service and is partly influenced by the service offering. In general, users have various experiences toward car sharing systems, and many relate it to technical aspects of the service. By exploring the users, the results point directly to different requirements that the service shall meet for it to enhance usage such as available vehicles at the needed time, simple and easy booking system with many features responsive to users’ needs, maintenance and cleanliness of vehicles, effective communication of service offering, and simple pricing schemes.
7

Collaboration between companies in sharing economy and Skanska

Myllynpää, Otto, Hanosh, Joseph January 2018 (has links)
Purpose: The aim is to investigate the content of the collaboration between car sharing companies and the construction company. The authors aim to map the different phases of collaboration and create a reasonable model to exhibit the collaboration. Methodology: This paper used qualitative approach as the method. Primary and secondary data were used. Primary data was gathered through phone interviews. The respondents were divided into three different categories in order to achieve the most comprehensive understanding. The categories are car sharing, construction company and city official organizations. In total the research had fourteen respondents from eleven different organizations. Findings: The authors developed a business model that may be used as a general outline if the closed-pool systems are applied to other major cities. The approximate costs were calculated and the general motivations for parties to advance to business making were mapped. The city hopes to increase alternative travelling methods and save for other purposes. The construction company aims to achieve zoning benefits in terms of cost-reduction and to have more space where to build. The car sharing companies aim to increase their market share and build their business. Conclusion: The findings indicate that the collaboration between car sharing companies and the construction company is possible within the city’s influence. The zoning benefits may be acquired with correct advancement through phases and, in theory, they would ensure a working business model that enables that the needs of all parties are satisfied. Practical Contribution: Decision makers of all parties may use the information of the study to build the optimal service to the Finnish business environment. The study is additionally intended to provide insight to individuals who are interested concerning zoning and closed-pool car sharing systems. Limitations: This study is delimited to understand the industry from the perspectives of car sharing companies, construction company and the city officials. Thus, the study does not investigate the open-pool business model characteristics of car sharing companies nor provide a follow-up information concerning the success of the collaboration. The study only involves companies operating in the Finnish business environment. Suggestions regarding future research: Future research should conduct a similar study like this, but in a larger scale, meaning in at least two different countries. Future studies can focus on more than one city within a country to raise the validity and reliability of the results and conclusions.
8

Reconciling the Car and the City: A Vision of Productive Urban Mobility

Pavlov, Ventzislav January 2011 (has links)
The relationship between cars and cities is changing. The auto-centric development predominant in America in the 20th century is beginning to subside and disappear. It is being replaced by efforts to make cities more sustainable, enjoyable, and accessible by their citizens without the need to always own a personal vehicle. Given the issues inherent in building more infrastructure to support the ever-growing demand for automobiles, continuing to rely on fossil fuels to power them, or living in neglected spaces designed for machines, an alternative solution is needed. While entirely giving up the car today is socially, politically, economically, and physically impossible, new ways of dealing with it are becoming viable. These developments are currently in their nascent stages, but they hold immense potential to transform the way urban mobility operates in the near future. This thesis explores architecture's response to this emerging reality and proposes that it is time for the car and the city to foster a productive relationship. In the past, architects and urban planners have designed and re-designed the built environment to accommodate the needs of the automobile. Today, there is a need for an architecture which integrates mobility and the means of powering it with vibrant and social urban space. Through the design of a networked mobility hub for Long Island City in Queens, New York, this thesis will re-imagine the relationship between cars and architecture, creating a new paradigm for dealing with the automobile in the city.
9

Reconciling the Car and the City: A Vision of Productive Urban Mobility

Pavlov, Ventzislav January 2011 (has links)
The relationship between cars and cities is changing. The auto-centric development predominant in America in the 20th century is beginning to subside and disappear. It is being replaced by efforts to make cities more sustainable, enjoyable, and accessible by their citizens without the need to always own a personal vehicle. Given the issues inherent in building more infrastructure to support the ever-growing demand for automobiles, continuing to rely on fossil fuels to power them, or living in neglected spaces designed for machines, an alternative solution is needed. While entirely giving up the car today is socially, politically, economically, and physically impossible, new ways of dealing with it are becoming viable. These developments are currently in their nascent stages, but they hold immense potential to transform the way urban mobility operates in the near future. This thesis explores architecture's response to this emerging reality and proposes that it is time for the car and the city to foster a productive relationship. In the past, architects and urban planners have designed and re-designed the built environment to accommodate the needs of the automobile. Today, there is a need for an architecture which integrates mobility and the means of powering it with vibrant and social urban space. Through the design of a networked mobility hub for Long Island City in Queens, New York, this thesis will re-imagine the relationship between cars and architecture, creating a new paradigm for dealing with the automobile in the city.
10

再配車を用いない複数ステーション型自動車共同利用システムの挙動に関するシミュレーション分析

山本, 俊行, YAMAMOTO, Toshiyuki, 中山, 晶一朗, NAKAYAMA, Shoichiro, 北村, 隆一, KITAMURA, Ryuichi 04 1900 (has links)
No description available.

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