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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
81

Studies on Mesenchymal growth factors during postnatal growth of the small intestine /

Gordon, Colin R. Unknown Date (has links)
Postnatal growth of the small intestine can be divided into two separate but complementary mechanisms; mucosal growth and organ (cylindrical) growth. Mucosal growth, observed by increasing villus area and crypt length, is upregulated during weaning, compared to pre or post-weaned time frames. The dynamics of organ growth, mediated by the process of crypt fission, is unknown during this period of postnatal development. Keratinocyte Growth Factor (KGF) and Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) are mesenchymally derived ligands which have been demonstrated to have trophic effects on the epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract in vitro and in vivo during embryonic development, repair/restitution and tumour progression. This study explores the hypothesis that small intestine organ growth occurs independently to that of mucosal growth and the mechanisms of growth are mediated by differential expression of either HGF or KGF within the pericryptal mesenchyme derived cells (fibroblasts). / Thesis (MApSc(BiomedicalScience))--University of South Australia, 2004.
82

Neurodevelopment in children with single-suture craniosynostosis: the early years

Knight, Sarah January 2010 (has links)
Craniosynostosis is a common developmental disorder characterised by premature, pathological fusion of one or more of the fibrous connections, or sutures, that normally separate the bony plates of the skull during early development. Premature sutural fusion, typically occurring in utero, results in anomalous skull growth, and may have consequences for the developing brain. Most cases of single-suture craniosynostosis (SSC) require surgery, preferentially performed within the first year of life, to release the fused suture and reshape the deformed skull and improve brain growth potential. The exact mechanisms by which brain development is disrupted in SSC are uncertain. Research suggests that children with all forms of SSC are at heightened risk for neuropsychological problems; however, the nature, extent and risk factors (e.g., genetic, environmental, severity of skull deformity) for these disturbances, are yet to be established. The aim of this study was to examine the impact that SSC may have on neurodevelopmental skills during infancy and to use a theory-driven approach to explore the possible contributory factors to developmental progression during infancy. / Participants included 30 infants with SSC (16 metopic, 14 sagittal). Participants were assessed on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development – Third Edition (BSID-III) during early infancy when they were between 5 and 15 months of age. Fifty-three percent (n=16) of these infants were also assessed in late infancy when they were between 17 and 33 months of age and at least six months post-surgical intervention. During both early and late infancy, children with craniosynostosis demonstrated significantly poorer gross motor skills compared to the normative sample, but other skills were in line with normal population expectations. Factors including subtype of craniosynostosis, severity of deformity, social risk and age at surgery, were not shown to be significantly associated with developmental level during early or late infancy. The impact of genetic variables on early development was unclear in the current sample. / This study has provided important insights into the functional significance of disruption to typical brain growth in infants with SSC. Findings indicate that SSC is a condition associated with developmental delay during early infancy prior to surgical intervention, with developmental concerns remaining evident post-surgically in late infancy. Findings support recommendations for the close monitoring of the development of these children during early life.
83

Studies on Mesenchymal growth factors during postnatal growth of the small intestine

Gordon, Colin R January 2005 (has links)
Postnatal growth of the small intestine can be divided into two separate but complementary mechanisms; mucosal growth and organ (cylindrical) growth. Mucosal growth, observed by increasing villus area and crypt length, is upregulated during weaning, compared to pre or post-weaned time frames. The dynamics of organ growth, mediated by the process of crypt fission, is unknown during this period of postnatal development. Keratinocyte Growth Factor (KGF) and Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) are mesenchymally derived ligands which have been demonstrated to have trophic effects on the epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract in vitro and in vivo during embryonic development, repair/restitution and tumour progression. This study explores the hypothesis that small intestine organ growth occurs independently to that of mucosal growth and the mechanisms of growth are mediated by differential expression of either HGF or KGF within the pericryptal mesenchyme derived cells (fibroblasts). Alternatively, the corresponding receptors for these ligands, c-met and bek, may exhibit differential expression within the proliferative compartment of the crypts. The indices of mucosal and organ growth were compared at various ages during early postnatal life (suckling), then early, middle and late weaning through to adult animals. Microdissection techniques utilising whole tissue samples enabled microscopic evaluation of growth. The assessment of KGF, bek, HGF and c-met was also undertaken using immunohistochemistry on formalin fixed, paraffin processed sections of rat jejunum. The highest rate of organ growth occurred during weaning and was immediately preceded at day 14 (of age) by a peak in the incidence of branching crypts. KGF immunolabelling was observed within the mesenchymal cells at the tips of the villus from mid-weaning onwards but at no stage within pericryptal fibroblasts. Both KGF and bek were demonstrated within the crypt epithelium, with highest levels observed during weaning. Immunolabelling for HGF demonstrated an ubiquitous distribution within both epithelial and mesenchymal tissues at all ages, whilst the expression of c-met was in the crypt cell compartment was limited to the time of weaning. The use of an in vivo blockade technique utilising an anti-HGF (D9) antibody from age 7 to 14 days did not demonstrate any reduction of the indices of organ or mucosal growth. These results suggest that rate of organ and mucosal growth increase concurrently during weaning. The demonstration of both bek and c-met in the crypt cell population during this period suggests that KGF and HGF are potential mediators of organ or mucosal growth, despite only HGF being demonstrated in the pericryptal mesenchymal derived cells. Further, the expression of KGF and HGF at sites beyond the crypts suggest these ligands play a greater role in the development of the rat small intestine during postnatal growth. / thesis (MApSc(BiomedicalScience))--University of South Australia, 2005.
84

Positive development among children of incarcerated parents : a focus of character /

Naudeau, Sophie. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Tufts University, 2005. / Adviser: Richard M. Lerner. Submitted to the Dept. of Child Development. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 133-152). Access restricted to members of the Tufts University community. Also available via the World Wide Web;
85

Neighborhood quality, childcare quality, and children's early developmental outcomes

Bor, Elif. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--George Mason University, 2007. / Title from PDF t.p. (viewed Jan. 17, 2008). Thesis director: Adam Winsler. Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology. Vita: p. 90. Includes bibliographical references (p. 84-89). Also available in print.
86

Trajectories of pure and co-occurring internalizing and externalizing problems from age 2 to age 12 findings from the NICHD study of early child care /

Fanti, Kostas Andrea. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Georgia State University, 2007. / Title from file title page. Christopher C. Henrich, committee chair; Gregory Jurkovic, Gabriel P. Kuperminc, Roger Bakeman, committee members. Electronic text (124 p. : ill. (some col.)) : digital, PDF file. Description based on contents viewed May 7, 2008. Includes bibliographical references (p. 100-124).
87

Why circus works : how the values and structures of circus make it a significant developmental experience for young people /

Bolton, Reg. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Murdoch University, 2004. / Thesis submitted to the Division of Arts. Bibliography: leaves i-xviii.
88

Why circus works how the values and structures of circus make it a significant developmental experience for young people /

Bolton, Reg. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Murdoch University, 2004. / Thesis submitted to the Division of Arts. Bibliography: leaves i-xviii.
89

The psychology of childhood

Tracy, Frederick, January 1893 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Clark University, 1893. / Bibliography: p. 91-94.
90

Parent education seminar: children's emotional development

Kase, Barbara E. January 2008 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.A.)--Regis University, Denver, Colo., 2008. / Title from PDF title page (viewed on Feb. 02, 2009). Includes bibliographical references.

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