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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Transition to clean household energy in low-income urban settlements of South Africa : safety, health and low carbon

Kimemia, David Kimani 02 July 2015 (has links)
D.Phil. (Environmental Management) / Clean, efficient, and low carbon energy services are crucial to the sustainable functioning of a household unit. Therefore, this study explores a vital query on the best pathway to achieve universal modern energy access in low-income South African households, based on information gathered from interviews in urban settlements. The thesis is based on published papers touching on thematic areas of household energy access – from baseline assessments to appraisal of modern energy programmes. A set of factors that are necessary for successful introduction and uptake of clean energy are identified for consideration by policy makers. Results indicate widespread use of paraffin and solid fuels in inefficient combustion technologies among low-income urban households even in the rich Johannesburg metropolis. In the absence of formal employment, some township residents use the basic fuels and conventional combustion technologies for productive purposes. Growth in the thermal-intensive informal businesses could be achieved faster through provision of efficient and reliable alternative energy technologies and better operational environment. This study has highlighted the undue risk borne by energy-poor households in the performance of the day-to-day energy tasks. The results show that household risk is positively correlated with the quality and quantity of energy used, with paraffin being the most risky fuel and the apparent risk being larger in non-electrified households. The affected communities have expressed a desire to adopt cleaner and safer forms of energy for residential and economic uses. It is incumbent upon the government and relevant role players to create enabling systems for acquisition of the preferred modern energy streams. An LPG intervention project in the City of Tshwane has demonstrated the inherent potential for modern energy to transform the socioeconomics and overall wellbeing of a family. The impact of such energy interventions could be improved through better-designed energy delivery models that cater for residential and productive needs, leading to sustainable communities. Education and income have been shown to be good precursors for modern energy uptake. Therefore, efforts towards sustainable energy for all should not only focus on indigent assistance and expansion of electrification, but also be intertwined with policies addressing skills need and better household incomes.
2

Barriers to and determinants of funding sustainable development projects in developing countries : a case study of the eThekwini Municipality

Sangham, Anilrai I. January 2017 (has links)
Submitted in fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, Durban University of Technology, Durban, South Africa, 2017. / The purpose of this study was to evaluate the barriers to and the determinants of funding sustainable development through the implementation of the Clean Development Mechanism at the Bisasar Road and Mariannhill landfill sites. The Clean Development Mechanism is an economic construct, arising out of the Kyoto Protocol (UNFCCC 2004:10), and formulated to promote social and economic welfare by transferring technology in such a manner, that it promotes sustainable development and ecological renewal. The stated goal of CDM (UNFCCC: 10) is to reduce harmful emissions and thereafter, to produce sustainable development and ecological renewal. This research utilised the case study methodology as advocated by Eisenhardt (1989:538). The study employed multiple data collection methodologies which included face-face interviews, within case analysis, triangulation, field notes and photographs. An important component of the data collection methodology was to access financial records of revenue flows for the CDM implementation process from January 2009 to December 2015. The research found that there is no conclusive evidence to suggest that the Clean Development Mechanism, as implemented at Bisasar Road and Mariannhill, reduced carbon emissions. Further, the study found that the production of clean energy produced financial losses rather than revenues for funding sustainable development. The relevance and value of this research lies in the presentation and formatting of the Systematic Sequential Analysis Model. The purpose of the Systematic Sequential Analysis Model is to introduce a series of financial, macro-economic, micro-economic, and technical sustainability filters for the implementation of the Clean Development Mechanism in developing countries. / D
3

Public policy and clean energy venture capital private equity investments in South Africa

Dzenga, Bruce 03 1900 (has links)
Thesis (MDF)--Stellenbosch University, 2013. / ENGLISH ABSTRACT: In 2007, Bürer and Wüstenhagen (2009) conducted a survey amongst European and United States venture capital and private equity investors (VC/PE) to ascertain their public clean energy policy preference and concluded that VC/PE investors view the feed-in tariff (FIT) scheme to be the most preferred policy option. In this research study, the author re-conducted part of the Bürer and Wüstenhagen (2009) survey with thirty South African VC/PE investors to determine their perceptions on clean energy public policy preference. It is evident from the survey, that opinions are varied and at times even contradictory. This in itself demonstrates an important feature of the South African VC/PE and clean energy industry: it is young, dynamic, changing rapidly and can look very different, depending on the vantage point. The investors surveyed were mainly optimistic about the long-term development of the South African renewable energy industry led by private investors. VC/PE investors in South Africa have mixed views on various investment options, and are concerned about both the regulatory and macro-economic trends. The interviews and survey results show a number of recurring issues. Altogether, the survey results indicate that VC/PE investors consider FITs to be the best public clean energy policy instrument in leveraging private investment and finance for renewable energy in South Africa. This study serves to illustrate and confirm, in line with empirical studies, that VC/PE investors in South Africa believe that clean energy market-pull policies provide an impetus and indeed spur private investor participation in clean energy in developing countries. While it is true that most VC/PE investors would prefer the price certainty associated with a FIT regime, this is almost an irrelevant question in South Africa since constitutionally the state is bound to procure through competitive tendering. This study also serves to highlight the need for more active research and attention in this field.

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