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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Exploring the Discourses of Marriage, Family, and Fatherhood in Married Gay Parents' Relational Talk

Baker, Benjamin Michael Alex 31 August 2017 (has links)
<p> The historic 2015 Supreme Court ruling in the case of <i>Obergefell v. Hodges</i>&mdash;which extended marriage equality to every state nationwide&mdash;coupled with an increase in the number of reported same-sex parent households in America (Gates, 2013) has resulted in greater social, political, and academic visibility for same-sex families in recent years (Breshears &amp; Braithwaite, 2014). Despite this increased cultural visibility, because gay parent families (GPFs) fall outside the parameters of the traditional family model (i.e., a married heterosexual husband and wife couple raising biological children) (Baxter, 2014a), they necessarily rely more heavily on discourse to manage their nontraditional family identity (Galvin, 2006; 2014). To date, little is known about how married gay male parents discursively create and sustain family identity and how they position their families in relation to the dominant heteronormative discourses of traditional marriage, family, and fatherhood. Framed by Baxter&rsquo;s (2011) relational dialectics theory&mdash;a heuristic communication theory useful for investigating the meaning-making process&mdash;this study explored the meaning(s) of marriage, family, and fatherhood in married gay fathers&rsquo; relational talk. I interviewed 13 married gay parent dyads twice to collect data from the couples across time as well as member check initial results during secondary interviews. Using contrapuntal analysis, I identified the following discourses at the three sites of meaning-making in the data: the discourses of marriage as symbolic and marriage as practical ; the discourses of traditional family structure and nontraditional family structure ; and the discourses of gay culture and gay fatherhood in addition to the discourses of heteronormative fatherhood and co-parenting. I argue that the couples&rsquo; talk reflected discursive struggles and, in one case, transformation, to generate relational meanings for their family identities. </p><p>
2

A Rhetorical Analysis of Hegemonic and Counterhegemonic Performances in World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE)

Ohlsen, David Blond 03 November 2017 (has links)
<p> A global entertainment powerhouse with millions of fans, WWE produces and archives thousands of hours of content every year that is often dismissed as low brow, incomprehensible, base, and/or harmless. However, WWE content is guilty of propitiating heteronormativity, binary gender construction, and the exploitation, repression, and erasure of LGBTQ+ culture. </p><p> I argue that the pro wrestling personae that perform in the fictional WWE universe are perfect embodiments of Judith Butler&rsquo;s theory of performativity, as evidenced in how the gender and sexuality of these often fluid and paradoxical personae are discursively constructed. This thesis also analyzes ironic and transcendent counterhegemonic performances by personae that can be read as rupturing WWE&rsquo;s repressive, heteronormative hegemony, as informed by Kenneth Burke. This thesis is an analysis of the counterhegemonic personae Nia Jax, Tyler Breeze, Bayley, and Chris Jericho based on their appearances in primary WWE content between 2 January, 2017 and 25 April, 2017.</p><p>
3

The new "gayborhood"| Defining and redefining the gay community in a technological age

Gallegos, Christopher M. 07 January 2017 (has links)
<p> What is community? What defines it, and what creates it? What&mdash;or who&mdash;is the gay community? Is the gay community the same as it was ten, twenty, or even thirty years ago? Those are some of the questions I will be answering as I explore the creation, expansion, and subsequent integration of the physical gay community into one that embraces an online, fragmented community. I will explore the creation and evolution of the gay community, examining its early years and the challenges it faced as a marginalized group. To help define community, I will use the concept of identity theory by incorporating the theory of play and weaving the idea of claiming public space into my argument to show how the physical, economic, social creation of the gay community is dependent upon a geographic and virtual community. Those examples will set up my argument that the idea of community has changed in part to the commonality of technology and social applications. I argue that the idea of the traditional gay and lesbian community, which relied heavily on where you lived, has become fragmented and disjointed because of the reliance of an online, virtual community which, in turn, has led to a lack of interpersonal connections among individuals of this marginalized group.</p>
4

Communicating Legacy: Media, Memory and Harvey Milk

Mau, Heidi A. January 2017 (has links)
Media & Communication / Ph.D. / Communicating Legacy: Media, Memory, and Harvey Milk examines publicly available media, artifacts and events in service of remembering Harvey Milk, who in 1977 became the first openly gay man elected to public office in California. Although he addressed issues of a diverse constituency, Milk is often remembered for demanding gay rights, his co-authorship of the San Francisco’s Human Rights Ordinance, and a successful campaign against the passage of Proposition 6 in 1978, a state proposition to prohibit gay men and lesbian women from working in public schools. His political career ended weeks later, when Milk was assassinated, along with San Francisco Mayor George Moscone, by former city supervisor and colleague Dan White. Forms of public and popular media addressing the remembrance of Milk and communicating his legacy include: journalism, books, documentary and fiction film, public art, theatrical and musical performances, memorials, commemorations, public history exhibitions, as well as types of legacy-naming. I term this media material media memoria – material in service of remembering. Through a mix of textual methods (visual/narrative/discourse), fieldwork (participant observation, interviewing) and archival/historical research methods, I examine how Milk media memoria create representations and narratives of Harvey Milk. I focus on how these representations narratives are used over time in the construction, negotiation and maintenance of local, LGBTQIA+ and eventually a larger public memory of Harvey Milk. This project is a mix of history, memory, and media analysis. It is written as an overlapping chronology, so the reader can experience the mediated communication of Milk’s legacy as it moves forward through time. It is situated within the study of media and communication but is interdisciplinary in that it finds inspiration from memory studies, film and media studies, museum and exhibition studies, and public history – all areas in which communication with a public, and mediated communication, play integral parts of collective memory narrative building. Communicating Legacy: Media, Memory and Harvey Milk aspires to be a contribution toward a more comprehensive history of the memory of Milk. The project concludes with a summary of the core and layered Milk memory narratives, a look at the key memory keepers and institutional players in Milk memory maintenance, and a discussion of the future of Milk memory. Through a discussion of how media memoria communicate the legacy of Harvey Milk, the dissertation adds to scholarly knowledge about how collective memory of public figures is constructed in American culture. Additionally, the dissertation works toward resolving deficiencies in research addressing LGBTQIA+ collective memory studies. / Temple University--Theses

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