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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

Behaviour of structural concrete subjected to biaxial flexure and axial compression

Hsu, Cheng-tzu January 1974 (has links)
No description available.
42

Flexural strength of reinforced concrete external column-beam joints

Yue, Hon-fai, Peter., 余漢輝. January 1973 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Civil Engineering / Master / Master of Philosophy
43

Effects of confinement and small axial load on flexural ductility of high-strength reinforced concrete beams

Chau, Siu-lee., 周小梨. January 2005 (has links)
published_or_final_version / abstract / Civil Engineering / Master / Master of Philosophy
44

Behavior of Prestressed Concrete Beams with CFRP Strands

Saeed, Yasir Matloob 22 March 2016 (has links)
The high cost of repairing reinforced or prestressed concrete structures due to steel corrosion has driven engineers to look for solutions. Much research has been conducted over the last two decades to evaluate the use of Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRPs) in concrete structures. Structural engineering researchers have been testing FRP to determine their usability instead of steel for strengthening existing reinforced concrete structures, reinforcing new concrete members, and for prestressed concrete applications. The high strength-to-weight ratio of FRP materials, especially Carbon FRP (CFRP), and their non-corrosive nature are probably the most attractive features of FRPs. In this study, an experimental program was conducted to investigate the flexural behavior of prestressed concrete beams pre-tensioned with CFRP strands. The bond characteristics were examined by means of experimentally measuring transfer length, flexural bond length, and bond stress profiles. A total of four rectangular beams pre-tensioned with one 0.5-in. diameter CFRP strand were fabricated and tested under cyclic loading for five cycles, followed by a monotonically increasing load until failure. In investigating bond properties, the experimental results were compared to the equations available in the literature. The results from the four flexural tests showed that the main problem of CFRP strands, in addition to their liner-elastic tensile behavior, was lack of adequate bonding between FRP and concrete. Poor bonding resulted in early failure due to slippage between FRPs and concrete. As a result, a new technique was developed in order to solve the bonding issues and improve the flexural response of CFRP prestressed concrete beams. The new technique involved anchoring the CFRP strands at the ends of the concrete beams using a new "steel tube" anchorage system. It was concluded that the new technique solved the bond problem and improved the flexural capacity by about 46%. A computer model was created to predict the behavior of prestressed beams pre-tensioned with CFRP. The predicted behavior was compared to the experimental results. Finally, the experimental results were compared to the behavior of prestressed concrete beams pre-tensioned with steel strands as generated by the computer model. The CFRP beams showed higher strength but lower ductility.
45

Time effects in the static testing of concrete to determine fracture energy

Siew, Hoi Choong. January 1986 (has links)
Call number: LD2668 .T4 1986 S53 / Master of Science / Civil Engineering
46

Evaluation of proposed methods to determine fracture parameters for concrete in bending

Yap, Sze-Ting. January 1986 (has links)
Call number: LD2668 .T4 1986 Y362 / Master of Science / Civil Engineering
47

Flexural Strength, Ductility, and Serviceability of Beams that Contain High-Strength Steel Reinforcement and High-Grade Concrete

Yosefani, Anas 06 June 2018 (has links)
Utilizing the higher capacity steel in design can provide additional advantages to the concrete construction industry including a reduction of congestion, improved concrete placement, reduction in the required reinforcement and cross sections which would lead to savings in materials, shipping, and placement costs. Using high-strength reinforcement is expected to impact the design provisions of ACI 318 code and other related codes. The Applied Technology Council (ATC-115) report "Roadmap for the Use of High-Strength Reinforcement in Reinforced Concrete Design" has identified key design issues that are affected by the use of high-strength reinforcement. Also, ACI ITG-6, "Design Guide for the Use of ASTM A1035 Grade 100 Steel Bars for Structural Concrete" and NCHRP Report 679, "Design of Concrete Structures Using High-Strength Steel Reinforcement" have made progress towards identifying how code provisions in ACI 318 and AASHTO could be changed to incorporate high-strength reinforcement. The current research aims to provide a closer investigation of the behavior of beams reinforced with high-strength steel bars (including ASTM A615 Grade 100 and ASTM A1035 Grades 100 and 120) and high-strength concrete up to 12000 psi. Focus of the research is on key design issues including: ductility, stiffness, deflection, and cracking. The research includes an extensive review of current literature, an analytical study and conforming experimental tests, and is directed to provide a number of recommendations and design guidelines for design of beams reinforced with high-strength concrete and high-strength steel. Topics investigated include: strain limits (tension-controlled and compression-controlled, and minimum strain in steel); possible change for strength reduction factor equation for transition zone (Φ); evaluation of the minimum reinforcement ratio (þmin); recommendations regarding limiting the maximum stress for the high-strength reinforcement; and prediction of deflection and crack width at service load levels. Moreover, this research includes long-term deflection test of a beam made with high grade concrete and high-strength steel under sustained load for twelve months to evaluate the creep deflection and to insure the appropriateness of the current ACI 318 time-dependent factor, λ, which does not consider the yield strength of reinforcement and the concrete grade.
48

Shear strength of reinforced concrete T-beams strengthened using carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates

Lee, Tuan Kuan, 1976- January 2003 (has links)
Abstract not available
49

Partial interaction behaviour of bolted side plated reinforced concrete beams

Yuan, Lie Ping. January 2003 (has links) (PDF)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 185-189) Aims to determine the effect of partial interaction on the behaviour of the concrete beam, plate and bolt connector components of the composite plated beam. Develops design rules for the determination of the ultimate capacity for bolted plate reinforced composite beams.
50

Partial interaction behaviour of bolted side plated reinforced concrete beams / by Lie Ping Yuan.

Yuan, Lie Ping January 2003 (has links)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 185-189) / xxviii, 207 p. : ill. ; 30 cm. / Title page, contents and abstract only. The complete thesis in print form is available from the University Library. / Aims to determine the effect of partial interaction on the behaviour of the concrete beam, plate and bolt connector components of the composite plated beam. Develops design rules for the determination of the ultimate capacity for bolted plate reinforced composite beams. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Adelaide, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2003

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