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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Modeling the process of satisfaction formation: towards a contingency perspective

Wang, Cheng, Marketing, Australian School of Business, UNSW January 2007 (has links)
Consumer satisfaction is a central topic in marketing. In the literature, a variety of conceptual models have been developed to capture the satisfaction formation process, with the dominant framework being the disconfirmation paradigm. However, despite its widespread acceptance and support, there is still a lack of clarity, especially regarding the role and relative importance of perceived performance in determining satisfaction. It has been suggested that satisfaction research has advanced into a stage where potential moderator variables need to be examined in order to explain previous mixed findings. The current research proposes a contingency model of the satisfaction formation process, which posits that the nature of the relationships between satisfaction and its two key antecedents (i.e., perceived performance and disconfirmation) is contingent on one situational moderator (ambiguity) and two individual moderators (experience and involvement). Empirical testing of the model is in the form of a cross-sectional survey in China's mobile phone services industry using a convenience student sample obtained from one Chinese university. The results show that both disconfirmation and perceived performance have a direct impact on satisfaction under conditions of low experience or high involvement, whereas satisfaction is solely determined by perceived performance in situations of high experience or low involvement. In addition, the results also support a joint moderator influence of ambiguity and experience on the relationships between satisfaction and its antecedents, which is especially true in the case of high ambiguity and low experience.
2

Modeling the process of satisfaction formation: towards a contingency perspective

Wang, Cheng, Marketing, Australian School of Business, UNSW January 2007 (has links)
Consumer satisfaction is a central topic in marketing. In the literature, a variety of conceptual models have been developed to capture the satisfaction formation process, with the dominant framework being the disconfirmation paradigm. However, despite its widespread acceptance and support, there is still a lack of clarity, especially regarding the role and relative importance of perceived performance in determining satisfaction. It has been suggested that satisfaction research has advanced into a stage where potential moderator variables need to be examined in order to explain previous mixed findings. The current research proposes a contingency model of the satisfaction formation process, which posits that the nature of the relationships between satisfaction and its two key antecedents (i.e., perceived performance and disconfirmation) is contingent on one situational moderator (ambiguity) and two individual moderators (experience and involvement). Empirical testing of the model is in the form of a cross-sectional survey in China's mobile phone services industry using a convenience student sample obtained from one Chinese university. The results show that both disconfirmation and perceived performance have a direct impact on satisfaction under conditions of low experience or high involvement, whereas satisfaction is solely determined by perceived performance in situations of high experience or low involvement. In addition, the results also support a joint moderator influence of ambiguity and experience on the relationships between satisfaction and its antecedents, which is especially true in the case of high ambiguity and low experience.

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