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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

The influence of individual differences on the effectiveness of comparative advertising

Dasgupta, Madhuchanda Ghose 12 1900 (has links)
No description available.
12

Visual communication using structural package design : curvilinear box pattern study exploring consumer appeal

Nicholas, Roland Allan George 05 1900 (has links)
No description available.
13

Effects of Perceived Quality, Product Category Similarity, and Brand Breadth on Consumers' Perceptions of Brand Extensions: Tests of Categorization Theory and Cognitive Response Theory

Lee, Dongdae 08 1900 (has links)
Various constructs are related to predicting consumers' perceptions of brand extensions. Among these, three constructs, perceptions of perceived quality (PQ) associated with the parent brand, product category similarity (PCS) of an extension to its parent brand, and brand breadth (BB) of the parent, are central to many brand extension studies. The purpose of this study is to clarify the roles of these three constructs and to pit predictions from an alternative theoretical perspective — cognitive response theory — against predictions based on categorization theory.
14

Factors affecting consumers' intention to buy in internet advertising.

January 1998 (has links)
by Ho Wai Shun, Ng Hung Kin, Terence. / Includes questionnaire. / Thesis (M.B.A.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1998. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 66-67). / TABLE OF CONTENTS --- p.III / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS --- p.IV / LIST OF TABLES --- p.V / Chapter / Chapter I. --- Introduction --- p.1 / Commercial Usage of the Internet --- p.1 / Internet as Advertising Medium --- p.5 / What is the Problem of Using Internet as Advertising Media --- p.7 / Objectives of the project --- p.7 / Chapter II. --- Conceptual Framework and Model --- p.9 / Factors affecting consumers' responses towards Advertisements in the Internet --- p.9 / Causal Relationship among Consumers' Responses --- p.10 / The Conceptual Model and Hypotheses --- p.12 / Conceptual Model --- p.12 / Hypotheses --- p.13 / Chapter III. --- Methodology --- p.15 / Research Design : Laboratory Experiment --- p.15 / Creating up the Experimental Web Site --- p.16 / Sample and Sampling Procedure --- p.17 / The Sample --- p.17 / Sampling Procedure --- p.19 / Data Collection Method --- p.20 / Operationization of Constructs --- p.21 / Data Analysis --- p.24 / MANOVA --- p.24 / Path Analysis (LISREL 8) --- p.24 / Chapter IV. --- "Results, Analysis and Discussion" --- p.26 / MANOVA Analysis --- p.26 / Path Analysis --- p.29 / Discussion --- p.31 / Chapter V. --- Conclusion and Managerial Implications --- p.32 / APPENDIX --- p.36 / BIBILIOGRAPHY --- p.66
15

The mediating role of hedonic shopping value in apparel shopping satisfaction

Chang, Eunyoung 10 September 2001 (has links)
The purpose of the present study was to investigate the moderating role of hedonic shopping value in shopping experience satisfaction in the context of clothing shopping. Hedonic shopping value is an emotional and hedonic appreciation of shopping. According to the existing literature, consumers' hedonic shopping value is associated with several antecedents such as involvement, variety seeking, and physical environment of stores. Involvement may heighten consumers' excitement with the shopping experience. Hedonic shoppers tend to seek variety and use exploratory buying behavior to experience the emotion of pleasant arousal in a retail setting. Emotional responses in stores can be affected by the store's environment, arguing positive mood is a significant predictor of both extra time, unplanned spending in shopping, and shopping satisfaction. To test the proposed model, a convenience sample of male and female Korean college students was employed. Pearson correlation, chi-square statistics, t-test, ANOVA, and EQS for structural equation modeling were utilized. The results of the study showed that people who, in general, enjoy clothing shopping feel more satisfied with their clothing shopping. It appears that the shopping skills acquired by consumers who are more involved in and enjoy shopping may lead to higher satisfaction. Female respondents were more involved in clothing shopping, were more satisfied with clothing shopping, and had a higher level of hedonic shopping value. Expectedly, the structural model for female subjects confirmed the existence of the mediating role of hedonic shopping value in shopping experience satisfaction whereas the model for male respondents and for all respondents in which male and female respondents combined did not. For the female group, involvement and variety seeking had no direct influences on shopping experience satisfaction. Rather, they influenced shopping experience satisfaction indirectly through hedonic shopping value. Hedonic shopping value did not play a role as an intervening variable for male consumers. This may be attributed to the fact that male respondents had considerably low levels of hedonic shopping value to be an intervening determinant. This result implies that male respondents may have greater utilitarian construct for clothing shopping satisfaction rather than hedonic constructs. / Graduation date: 2002
16

The market maven : implications for a multicultural environment

Cal, Yolanda Rachele 23 June 2011 (has links)
Not available / text
17

Corporate social responsibility and consumer purchase intention

Dodd, Melissa D. January 2009 (has links)
Problem: Because an organizations’ profits are generally derived from product sales, it is important to recognize the relationship between consumers’ purchase intentions and organizational involvement in socially responsible practices. A gap exists in the research and studies conducted on consumer social responsibility as it relates to purchase intentions from a consumer perspective. H1: A positive association exists between an organization’s involvement in CSR programs and consumers’ purchase intentions. Thus, consumers are more likely to purchase an organization’s product if that organization is involved in socially responsible practices. RQ1: Are consumers aware of specific organizational involvement in socially responsible programs? RQ2: Are consumers aware of a lack of specific organizational involvement in socially responsible programs? Significance of Problem: Despite evidence that consumers appear to feel strongly about organizational involvement in socially responsible programs, research has shown that social responsibility was not a dominant goal in a majority of companies studied. Value: The relationship between CSR and consumers’ purchase intentions is important to understand because often CSR is dismissed as merely another public relations’ tool. However, understanding the underlying reasons consumers make purchases in relation to CSR would contribute to the understanding of CSR as a strategic management function overall. Methodology: Using a combination of interviews and emailed surveys, consumers were asked questions to determine the association between organizational involvement in socially responsible programs and consumers’ purchase intentions. Additionally, consumers were asked to identify their awareness of specific organizational involvement in socially responsible programs / Department of Journalism
18

The impact of modular design on product use and maintenance

Smith, Robert J. 08 April 2009 (has links)
Modularity is a means of managing product complexity by arranging components into hierarchical independent subassemblies of common purpose. It offers advantages to manufacturers and producers and is assumed to benefit users as well. The producers have received most of the focus, however. Designers must be able to ensure the needs of both parties are being met but too little is known about users' responses to modular designs and the designer's role in handling modularity. This thesis demonstrates that modularity has an impact on users. The research specifically focused on aspects of modularity available to users. It consisted of three phases: a review of existing literature, an interview phase, and a survey phase. The interview phase elicited common terms for discussing modularity in consumer products. The survey tested the traits that emerged. Both phases used object pairs with similar purpose but differing in degree of modularity. During the interview phase, participants were shown pictures of eight pairs of objects and asked questions about their use and maintenance. They were then asked to generate a series of word pairs, opposing descriptors that could be used to distinguish the two variants. The most commonly occurring pairs were transformed into survey questions. The survey used the same set of object pairs, each accompanied by descriptive phrases built around the traits elicited from the interviews. Survey participants were asked to identify which of the two variants was best described by each phrase and the strength of that association. The responses indicated that modularity generally increases users' perceptions of complexity, presence of replaceable parts, and versatility. Modularity also diminished perceptions of durability, ease of maintenance, and ease of use. Investigation of object groupings, both predefined and emergent in the data, revealed additional context sensitive relationships. Several traits also demonstrated strong correlations with each other. Establishing these relationships is necessary to convert assumptions into knowns before research can continue. This thesis offers designers insight into the expectations surrounding modular design. As manufacturers continue to push modular design, designers will need to understand its impact on end users to ensure the needs of all stakeholders are being met.
19

Attitudinal Difference toward Cause-related Marketing: The Role of Product Involvement / Role of Product Involvement

Zhou, Na, 1982- 06 1900 (has links)
xi, 47 p. A print copy of this thesis is available through the UO Libraries. Search the library catalog for the location and call number. / Are consumers more likely to favor brands offered by companies that engage in cause-related marketing (CRM)? This study investigated the effect ofCRM messages on consumers' attitudes toward the sponsoring companies, brand preferences, purchase intentions, and recommendations to others based on personal involvement with the products. Participants were invited to take an online survey to evaluate four print advertisements. Zaichkowsky's Personal Involvement Inventory was applied to measure consumers' involvement with the products. The results suggest that when involvement is high, consumers develop more favorable responses toward the companies with CRM messages than those companies without CRM messages. When involvement is low, however, consumers' responses toward the sponsoring companies vary. In short, the positive effect ofthe perceived CRM advantages is found contingent upon consumers' involvement with the product. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. / Adviser: Kim Sheehan
20

Consumer perspectives on the social services : a study in the measurement of consumer satisfaction /

Reid, Paul Nelson January 1980 (has links)
No description available.

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