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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A novel probabilistic framework for microarray data analysis from fundamental probability models to experimental validation /

Gelmi, Claudio A. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Delaware, 2006. / Principal faculty advisors: Babatunde Ogunnaike and Jeremy S. Edwards, Dept. of Chemical Engineering. Includes bibliographical references.
2

Contributions to ancestral inference for supercritical banching Processes and high-dimensional data analysis

Hanlon, Bret Michael. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Cornell University, August, 2009. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 133-145).
3

Clustering analysis of microarray gene expression data /

Szeto, Lap Keung. January 2005 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.Phil.)--City University of Hong Kong, 2005. / "Submitted to Department of Computer Engineering and Information Technology in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy" Includes bibliographical references (leaves 70-79)
4

Bioinformatic analyses of microarray experiments on genetic control of gene expression level

Kirk, Michael, School of Biotechnology & Biomolecular Science, UNSW January 2006 (has links)
The advent of microarray technology, allowing measurement of gene expression levels for thousands of genes in parallel, has made possible experiments designed to investigate the genetic control of variation in gene expression level (described in the literature as ???genetical genomics??? or ???eQTL??? experiments). Published results from these studies, in yeast and in mice, show that genetic variation is an important factor in gene regulation, and furthermore that individual polymorphisms modify the expression level of many genes. The concern of this thesis is the bioinformatic analyses of the expression level and genotype data sets that are the raw material for these studies. In particular this thesis addresses the two issues of detection of artefactual effects, and maximizing the information that can be extracted from the data. It is shown that while a polymorphism affecting the expression of many genes may be readily detected, care must be taken to determine whether the detected effect is genuinely one of genetic control of expression level, rather than the effect of correlations in measured expression level not of genetic cause. A significance test is devised to distinguish between these cases. The detection of artefactual correlation is explored further in the reanalysis of the published data from a large yeast study. A critique is given of the permutation method used to ascribe genetic control as the cause of inter gene expression level correlation. The presence of some degree of artefactual correlation is shown, and novel methods are presented for identifying such artefacts. To extend the analyses that may be applied to eQTL data, an algorithm is presented for determining secondary eQTLs for gene expression level (as opposed to a single primary QTL), along with a significance test for the putative QTL found. The technique is demonstrated on a large public data set. In addition to the use for which they are intended, the data sets generated for eQTL studies provide opportunities for additional analyses. In this thesis a method is developed for calculating a genome wide map of meiotic recombination frequency from the genotype data for multiple segregant strains. The method is demonstrated on the published genotype data generated for a large yeast eQTL study.
5

Bioinformatic analyses of microarray experiments on genetic control of gene expression level

Kirk, Michael, School of Biotechnology & Biomolecular Science, UNSW January 2006 (has links)
The advent of microarray technology, allowing measurement of gene expression levels for thousands of genes in parallel, has made possible experiments designed to investigate the genetic control of variation in gene expression level (described in the literature as ???genetical genomics??? or ???eQTL??? experiments). Published results from these studies, in yeast and in mice, show that genetic variation is an important factor in gene regulation, and furthermore that individual polymorphisms modify the expression level of many genes. The concern of this thesis is the bioinformatic analyses of the expression level and genotype data sets that are the raw material for these studies. In particular this thesis addresses the two issues of detection of artefactual effects, and maximizing the information that can be extracted from the data. It is shown that while a polymorphism affecting the expression of many genes may be readily detected, care must be taken to determine whether the detected effect is genuinely one of genetic control of expression level, rather than the effect of correlations in measured expression level not of genetic cause. A significance test is devised to distinguish between these cases. The detection of artefactual correlation is explored further in the reanalysis of the published data from a large yeast study. A critique is given of the permutation method used to ascribe genetic control as the cause of inter gene expression level correlation. The presence of some degree of artefactual correlation is shown, and novel methods are presented for identifying such artefacts. To extend the analyses that may be applied to eQTL data, an algorithm is presented for determining secondary eQTLs for gene expression level (as opposed to a single primary QTL), along with a significance test for the putative QTL found. The technique is demonstrated on a large public data set. In addition to the use for which they are intended, the data sets generated for eQTL studies provide opportunities for additional analyses. In this thesis a method is developed for calculating a genome wide map of meiotic recombination frequency from the genotype data for multiple segregant strains. The method is demonstrated on the published genotype data generated for a large yeast eQTL study.
6

An examination of the regulation of gene expression using microarray and genomic resources /

Cheung, Ming-ming. January 2002 (has links)
Thesis (M. Phil.)--University of Hong Kong, 2002. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 79-86).
7

Optimisation of cDNA microarray tumour profiling and molecular analysis of epithelial ovarian cancer /

Van Laar, Ryan. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Melbourne, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and The Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2006. / Typescript. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 281-331).
8

Analysis of gene expression data in transgenic and non-transgenic soybean cultivars using bioinformatics tools

Cheng, Kei Chin, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.Sc.). / Written for the Dept. of Plant Science. Title from title page of PDF (viewed 2008/01/15). Includes bibliographical references.
9

Gene selection by 1-D discrete wavelet transform for classifying cancer samples using DNA microarray data

Jose, Adarsh. January 2009 (has links)
Dissertation (Ph. D.)--University of Akron, Dept. of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, 2009. / "May, 2009." Title from electronic dissertation title page (viewed 8/3/2009) Advisor, Dale H. Mugler; Co-advisor, Zhong-Hui Duan; Committee members, Daniel B. Sheffer; Department Chair, Daniel B. Sheffer; Dean of the College, George K. Haritos; Dean of the Graduate School, George R. Newkome. Includes bibliographical references.
10

Methods for incorporating biological information into the statistical analysis of gene expression microarray data /

Leader, Debbie. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (PhD--Statistics)--University of Auckland, 2009. / " A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Statistics." Includes bibliographical references (p.165-184).

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