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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Hybrid microscopic-mesoscopic traffic simulation

Burghout, Wilco January 2004 (has links)
Traffic simulation is an important tool for modelling the operations of dynamic traffic systems and helps analyse the causes and potential solutions of traffic problems such as congestion and traffic safety. Microscopic simulation models provide a detailed representation of the traffic process, which makes them most suitable for evaluation of complicated traffic facilities and Intelligent Transportation Systems that often consist of complex traffic management, safety and information systems. Macroscopic and mesoscopic models on the other hand, capture traffic dynamics in lesser detail, but are faster and easier to apply and calibrate than microscopic models. Therefore they are most suitable for modelling large networks, while microscopic models are usually applied to smaller areas. The objective of this thesis is to combine the strengths of both modelling approaches and diminish their individual weaknesses by constructing a hybrid mesoscopic-microscopic model that applies microscopic simulation to areas of specific interest, while simulating a surrounding network in lesser detail with a mesoscopic model. Earlier attempts at hybrid modelling have concentrated on integrating macroscopic and microscopic models and have proved difficult due to the large difference between the continuous-flow representation of traffic in macroscopic models and the detailed vehicle-and driver-behaviour represented in microscopic models. These problems are solved in this thesis by developing a mesoscopic vehicle-based and event-based model that avoids the (dis)aggregation problems of traffic flows at the inter-model boundaries. In addition, this thesis focuses on the general problems of consistency across the entire hybrid model. The requirements are identified that are important for a hybrid model to be consistent across the models at different levels of detail. These requirements vary from network and route-choice consistency to consistency of traffic dynamics across the boundaries of the micro- and mesoscopic submodels. An integration framework is proposed that satisfies these requirements. This integration framework has been implemented in a prototype hybrid model, MiMe, which is used to demonstrate the correctness of the solutions to the various integration issues. The hybrid model integrates MITSIMLab, a microscopic traffic simulation model, and Mezzo, the newly developed mesoscopic model. Both the hybrid model and the new Mezzo model are applied in a number of case studies, including a network in the North of Stockholm, which show their validity and applicability. The results are promising and support both the proposed integration architecture and the importance of integrating microscopic and mesoscopic models. / QC 20100520
2

Security system for ad-hoc wireless networks based on generic secure objects

Ciobanu Morogan, Matei January 2005 (has links)
As computing devices and wireless connectivity become ubiquitous, new usage scenarios emerge, where wireless communication links between mobile devices are established in an ad-hoc manner. The resulting wireless ad-hoc networks differ from classical computer networks in a number of ways, lack of permanent access to the global network and heterogeneous structure being some of them. Therefore, security services and mechanisms that have been designed for classical computer networks are not always the optimal solution in an ad-hoc network environment. The research is focused on analyzing how standard security services that are available in classical networks can be provided in an ad-hoc wireless network environment. The goal is to design a security system optimized for operation in ad-hoc wireless networks that provides the same security services – authentication, access control, data confidentiality and integrity, non-repudiation – currently available in classic wired networks. The first part of the thesis is the design and implementation of a security platform based on generic secure objects. The flexible and modular nature of this platform makes it suitable for deployment on devices that form ad-hoc networks – ranging from Java-enabled phones to PDAs and laptops. We then investigate the problems that appear when implementing in ad-hoc networks some of the security technologies that are standard building blocks of secure systems in classical computer networks. Two such technologies have been found to present problems, namely the areas of certification and access control. In a series of articles, we have described the problems that appear and devised solutions to them by designing protocols, techniques and extensions to standards that are optimized for usage in the ad-hoc network environment. These techniques, together with the functionality provided by the underlying security platform, are used to implement all standard security services – confidentiality, authentication, access control, non repudiation and integrity, allowing to integrate ad-hoc networks into the existing security infrastructure. / QC 20101001
3

Flow Java : declarative concurrency for Java

Drejhammar, Frej January 2004 (has links)
This thesis presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of Flow Java, a programming language for the implementation of concurrent programs. Flow Java adds powerful programming abstractions for automatic synchronization of concurrent programs to Java. The abstractions added are single assignment variables (logic variables) and futures (read-only views of logic variables). The added abstractions conservatively extend Java with respect to types, parameter passing, and concurrency. Futures support secure concurrent abstractions and are essential for seamless integration of single assignment variables into Java. These abstractions allow for simple and concise implementation of high-level concurrent programming abstractions. Flow Java is implemented as a moderate extension to the GNU GCJ/libjava Java compiler and runtime environment. The extension is not speci c to a particular implementation, it could easily be incorporated into other Java implementations. The thesis presents three implementation strategies for single assignment variables. One strategy uses forwarding and dereferencing while the two others are variants of Taylor's scheme. Taylor's scheme represents logic variables as a circular list. The thesis presents a new adaptation of Taylor's scheme to a concurrent language using operating system threads. The Flow Java system is evaluated using standard Java benchmarks. Evaluation shows that in most cases the overhead incurred by the extensions is between 10% and 50%. For some pathological cases the runtime increases by up to 150%. Concurrent programs making use of Flow Java's automatic synchronization, generally perform as good as corresponding Java programs. In some cases Flow Java programs outperform Java programs by as much as 33%. / <p>QCR 20161026</p>
4

Computational models of lamprey locomotor network neurons

Huss, Mikael January 2005 (has links)
QC 20101201
5

Flow Java : declarative concurrency for Java

Drejhammar, Frej January 2004 (has links)
<p>This thesis presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of Flow Java, a programming language for the implementation of concurrent programs. Flow Java adds powerful programming abstractions for automatic synchronization of concurrent programs to Java. The abstractions added are single assignment variables (logic variables) and futures (read-only views of logic variables).</p><p>The added abstractions conservatively extend Java with respect to types, parameter passing, and concurrency. Futures support secure concurrent abstractions and are essential for seamless integration of single assignment variables into Java. These abstractions allow for simple and concise implementation of high-level concurrent programming abstractions.</p><p>Flow Java is implemented as a moderate extension to the GNU GCJ/libjava Java compiler and runtime environment. The extension is not speci c to a particular implementation, it could easily be incorporated into other Java implementations.</p><p>The thesis presents three implementation strategies for single assignment variables. One strategy uses forwarding and dereferencing while the two others are variants of Taylor's scheme. Taylor's scheme represents logic variables as a circular list. The thesis presents a new adaptation of Taylor's scheme to a concurrent language using operating system threads.</p><p>The Flow Java system is evaluated using standard Java benchmarks. Evaluation shows that in most cases the overhead incurred by the extensions is between 10% and 50%. For some pathological cases the runtime increases by up to 150%. Concurrent programs making use of Flow Java's automatic synchronization, generally perform as good as corresponding Java programs. In some cases Flow Java programs outperform Java programs by as much as 33%.</p>
6

Computational models of lamprey locomotor network neurons

Huss, Mikael January 2005 (has links)
No description available.
7

Designs and analysis in structural peer-to-peer systems

El-Ansary, Sameh January 2005 (has links)
<p>Peer-to-Peer (P2P) computing is a recent hot topic in the areas of networking and distributed systems. Work on P2P computing was triggered by a number of ad-hoc systems that made the concept popular. Later, academic research efforts started to investigate P2P computing issues based on scientific principles. Some of that research produced a number of structured P2P systems that were collectively referred to by the term ``Distributed Hash Tables'' (DHTs). However, the research occurred in a diversified way leading to the appearance of similar concepts yet lacking a common perspective and not heavily analyzed. In this thesis we present a number of papers representing our research results in the area of structured P2P systems grouped as two sets labeled respectively ``Designs'' and ``Analyses''.</p><p>The contribution of the first set of papers is as follows. First, we present the principle of distributed k-ary search (DKS) and argue that it serves as a framework for most of the recent P2P systems known as DHTs. That is, given the DKS framework, understanding existing DHT systems is done simply by seeing how they are instances of that framework. We argue that by perceiving systems as instances of the DKS framework, one can optimize some of them. We illustrate that by applying the framework to the Chord system, one of the most established DHT systems. Second, We show how the DKS framework helps in the design of P2P algorithms by two examples: (a) The DKS(n;k;f) system which is a system designed from the beginning on the principles of distributed k-ary search. (b) Two broadcast algorithms that take advantage of the distributed k-ary search tree.</p><p>The contribution of the second set of papers is as follows. We account for two approaches that we used to evaluate the performance of a particular class of DHTs, namely the one adopting periodic stabilization for topology maintenance. The first approach was of an intrinsic empirical nature. In that approach, we tried to perceive a DHT as a physical system and account for its properties in a size-independent manner. The second approach was of a more analytical nature. In this approach we applied the technique of Master equations, which is a widely used technique in the analysis of natural systems. The application of the technique lead to a highly accurate description of the behavior of structured overlays.</p><p>Additionally, the thesis contains a primer on structured P2P systems that tries to capture the main ideas that are prevailing in the field and enumerates a subset of the current hot and open research issues.</p>
8

Systematic Design of Data Management for Real-Time Data-Intensive Applications

Cai, Simin January 2017 (has links)
Modern real-time data-intensive systems generate large amounts of data that are processed using complex data-related computations such as data aggregation. In order to maintain the consistency of data, such computations must be both logically correct (producing correct and consistent results) and temporally correct (completing before specified deadlines). One solution to ensure logical and temporal correctness is to model these computations as transactions and manage them using a Real-Time Database Management System (RTDBMS). Ideally, depending on the particular system, the transactions are customized with the desired logical and temporal correctness properties, which are achieved by the customized RTDBMS with appropriate run-time mechanisms. However, developing such a data management solution with provided guarantees is not easy, partly due to inadequate support for systematic analysis during the design. Firstly, designers do not have means to identify the characteristics of the computations, especially data aggregation, and to reason about their implications. Design flaws might not be discovered, and thus they may be propagated to the implementation. Secondly, trade-off analysis of conflicting properties, such as conflicts between transaction isolation and temporal correctness, is mainly performed ad-hoc, which increases the risk of unpredictable behavior. In this thesis, we propose a systematic approach to develop transaction-based data management with data aggregation support for real-time systems. Our approach includes the following contributions: (i) a taxonomy of data aggregation, (ii) a process for customizing transaction models and RTDBMS, and (iii) a pattern-based method of modeling transactions in the timed automata framework, which we show how to verify with respect to transaction isolation and temporal correctness. Our proposed taxonomy of data aggregation processes helps in identifying their common and variable characteristics, based on which their implications can be reasoned about. Our proposed process allows designers to derive transaction models with desired properties for the data-related computations from system requirements, and decide the appropriate run-time mechanisms for the customized RTDBMS to achieve the desired properties. To perform systematic trade-off analysis between transaction isolation and temporal correctness specifically, we propose a method to create formal models of transactions with concurrency control, based on which the isolation and temporal correctness properties can be verified by model checking, using the UPPAAL tool. By applying the proposed approach to the development of an industrial demonstrator, we validate the applicability of our approach. / DAGGERS
9

Computational Complexity of some Optimization Problems in Planning

Aghighi, Meysam January 2017 (has links)
Automated planning is known to be computationally hard in the general case. Propositional planning is PSPACE-complete and first-order planning is undecidable. One method for analyzing the computational complexity of planning is to study restricted subsets of planning instances, with the aim of differentiating instances with varying complexity. We use this methodology for studying the computational complexity of planning. Finding new tractable (i.e. polynomial-time solvable) problems has been a particularly important goal for researchers in the area. The reason behind this is not only to differentiate between easy and hard planning instances, but also to use polynomial-time solvable instances in order to construct better heuristic functions and improve planners. We identify a new class of tractable cost-optimal planning instances by restricting the causal graph. We study the computational complexity of oversubscription planning (such as the net-benefit problem) under various restrictions and reveal strong connections with classical planning. Inspired by this, we present a method for compiling oversubscription planning problems into the ordinary plan existence problem. We further study the parameterized complexity of cost-optimal and net-benefit planning under the same restrictions and show that the choice of numeric domain for the action costs has a great impact on the parameterized complexity. We finally consider the parameterized complexity of certain problems related to partial-order planning. In some applications, less restricted plans than total-order plans are needed. Therefore, a partial-order plan is being used instead. When dealing with partial-order plans, one important question is how to achieve optimal partial order plans, i.e. having the highest degree of freedom according to some notion of flexibility. We study several optimization problems for partial-order plans, such as finding a minimum deordering or reordering, and finding the minimum parallel execution length.
10

Trådlös Positionering / Wireless Positioning

Lövgren, Olle, Sjölund Alm, Nils January 2017 (has links)
No description available.

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