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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Manpower and facility mixes in a dental practice: a simulation analysis

Carswell, William Davis 12 1900 (has links)
No description available.
2

Efficiency in dental practice organizations using data envelope analysis to model production frontiers

Armstrong, James L. January 1995 (has links)
Thesis (M.B.A.)--Simon Fraser University, 1995. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
3

Efficiency in dental practice organizations using data envelope analysis to model production frontiers

Armstrong, James L. January 1995 (has links)
Thesis (M.B.A.)--Simon Fraser University, 1995. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
4

Contribuição ao estudo da fadiga através da interação iluminação - visão - coordenação motora, na prática odontológica

Naressi, Wilson Galvão [UNESP] 11 May 1973 (has links) (PDF)
Made available in DSpace on 2015-01-26T13:21:30Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 1973-05-11Bitstream added on 2015-01-26T13:30:18Z : No. of bitstreams: 1 000024616.pdf: 3436461 bytes, checksum: c0826227acfa9935eb347b09d60092b3 (MD5)
5

Contribuição ao estudo da fadiga através da interação iluminação - visão - coordenação motora, na prática odontológica /

Naressi, Wilson Galvão. January 1973 (has links)
Orientador: Ernesto Pilotto Gomes de Medeiros / Resumo: Não disponível / Abstract: Not avaiilabe / Doutor
6

Music listening : its effectiveness in reducing anxiety of patients undergoing minor dental procedures

Martin, Patrick William 01 January 1986 (has links)
No description available.
7

Interprofessional Competencies Among Dental Hygiene Students and Registered Dental Hygienists

Beall, Andrea January 2020 (has links)
Interprofessional education is recommended as a necessary step to prepare a collaborative, practice-ready workforce to engage in effective teamwork and team-based care. Professional identity and the perceptions of stereotypes that professionals hold of other professions have been identified as key factors in either enhancing or inhibiting effective teamwork. Information about interprofessional collaboration and education, competencies, and related variables is limited, particularly within the profession of dental hygiene. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of interprofessional competencies to professional identity and stereotypes among U.S. dental hygiene students and practicing dental hygienists. The study used a correlational design with a cross-sectional survey utilizing the Student Stereotype Rating Questionnaire, Interprofessional Education Collaborative. Revised Survey, and Macleod Clark Professional Identity Survey-9 instruments. A total of 423 participants were recruited: 222 dental hygienists and 201 dental hygiene students. The survey data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlational analysis, independent and paired t tests, and multiple regression. Dental hygiene students had a significantly higher interprofessional competency aggregated mean score than registered dental hygienists (t = -4.837). Dental hygiene students’ interprofessional education experience correlated positively with the Interprofessional Competency Revised Scale score (r = 0.290, n = 201, p < .01). There was a modest relationship between interprofessional practice experience and the Interprofessional Competency score (r =. 255, n = 222, p < .01). The stereotypes dental hygienists and dental hygiene students have of themselves (auto-stereotypes) were rated the highest (M = 40.46, SD = 4.45) compared to stereotypes they have about dentists (hetero-stereotypes) (M = 37.57, SD = 6.03). The results of the multiple regression analysis, F (4, 418) = 16.805 p < .001, R2 = 0.14, showed that the variables of professional identity, interprofessional education activity experience, auto-stereotypes, and being a dental hygiene student were predictors of interprofessional competency. This study contributes to a unique understanding of the relationship between interprofessional competencies to stereotypes and professional identity among practicing dental hygienists and dental hygiene students. With these findings, educators and policymakers can identify issues and address modifications to curricula, professional development, and organizational changes.
8

Licensure and the dental market

Choby, Willeam A. 28 July 2010 (has links)
The dental profession in the United States has a history of organized activity designed to secure a market protected from outsiders. The development of this phenomenon follows a course that has paralleled that of the other licensed professions. The ultimate capture of the official blessings of the state by the argument of professional competency in the name of the public interest placed the profession in firm control of the dental market. The gatekeepers are dentists who control the market with the authority of the state police powers via the licensure process. These boards have executive, legislative and judicial authority granted by state legislatures in order to protect the interests of the public's dental health. However, the inflation rate of dental fees above the general inflation rate over the past several years suggests that the market has not been behaving in a competitive fashion. The decline in the incidence of dental caries coupled with an oversupply of dentists caused by the Congressional intervention of the 1960s and early 70s, has caused a financial crunch for the private practitioner. Meanwhile, emergent technology has created a market outside of the traditional political hierarchy, that threatens the authoritative structure of the profession. The processes of a simultaneous scientific and economic revolution poses an enormous threat to the status quo. The conflict has been drawn to the public forum of the state dental boards. Unfortunately, the government's goal of affordable, quality dental care for its citizens had been supplanted by "turf" battles, restricted market access and manpower mobility. The state dental boards have lost sight of their mission; to protect the public interest in the marketplace. / Master of Arts
9

Corporate social responsibility in the dental technology industry in KwaZulu-Natal

Zondi, Minenhle Promise Phamela 06 March 2015 (has links)
Submitted in full compliance with the requirements of the degree of Master of Technology: Dental Technology, Durban University of Technology, 2014. / This study investigated how corporate social responsibility (CSR) is understood within the KwaZulu-Natal dental technology industry, as an indication of the position of the industry nationally. The objectives of this study were to provide clarity regarding how the members of the dental technology industry in KwaZulu-Natal perceive CSR, to determine what is being practised in terms of CSR, and to provide possible insights into how the dental technology industry in KwaZulu-Natal might understand and consider CSR principles going into the future. This is a qualitative study conducted in the interpretive paradigm. The conceptual framework utilised for the study was Carroll’s CSR pyramid (1991) which was reviewed by Ferrell et al. (2010). For the purpose of this study CSR was understood to encompass the economic, legal and ethical aspects of running a business. It further extended into an understanding of philanthropy that goes beyond the primary purpose of a business. Simple random sampling was used to select participants for individual semi-structured interviews. The data collected was analysed using thematic content analysis. This study found that CSR is an unfamiliar term amongst dental laboratory owners and dental technicians. Dental laboratory owners and technicians failed to understand that CSR involves not only the basic aspects of running a business which are economic advancement but also compliance with legislation and ethics considerations. This study found that the poor understanding of CSR by dental laboratory owners and dental technicians stems from a poor understanding of basic business principles as was revealed in reported practices of the industry participants that lacked business ethical consideration. The perceived lack of participation in the industry by the South African Dental Technicians Council was seen to be a contributing factor to unethical behaviour within the industry. A degree of localised philanthropy was found to be practised by some in the industry. However, such practice was not generally accepted as a norm and that the industry should necessarily take cognisance of. The results generated by this study indicate that the dental technology industry’s lack of knowledge and understanding of CSR are such that industry should be informed and educated in CSR practices and that a coordinated approach to CSR practice by the industry is needed.

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