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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Patterns of care for diabetes: risk factors for vision-threatening retinopathy

Orr, Neil John January 2005 (has links)
Master of Public Health / OBJECTIVES: In Australia, diabetes causes significant morbidity and mortality. Whilst the need to prevent diabetes and its complications has been widely recognised, the capacity of health care systems - which organise diabetes care - to facilitate prevention has not been fully established. METHODS: A series of seven population-based case-control studies were used to examine the effectiveness of the Australian health care system and its capacity to manage diabetes. Six of the studies compared the patterns of care of patients who had developed advanced diabetes complications in 2000 (cases), to similar patients who remained free of the condition (controls) across Australia and for various risk groups. A secondary study investigated the role of treating GPs in the development of the outcome. RESULTS: A strong relationship between the patterns of care and the development of advanced diabetes complications was found and is described in Chapter 4. In Chapter 5, this same relationship was investigated for each Australian state and territory, and similar findings were made. The study in Chapter 6 investigated whether late diagnosis or the patterns of care was the stronger risk factor for advanced diabetes complications, finding that the greatest risk was associated with the latter. In Chapter 7 the influence of medical care during the pre-diagnosis period was explored, and a strong relationship between care obtained in this period and the development of advanced complications was found. In Chapter 8, which investigated the role of socio-economic status in the development of advanced complications, found that the risk of advanced diabetes complications was higher in low socio-economic groups. Chapter 9 investigated geographic isolation and the development of advanced diabetes complications and found that the risk of advanced complications was higher in geographically isolated populations. Finally, Chapter 10, which utilised a provider database, found that some GP characteristics were associated with the development of advanced diabetes complications in patients. CONCLUSION: A number of major risk factors for the development of advanced complications in Australia was found. These related to poorer diabetes management, later diagnosis, low socioeconomic status and geographic isolation. Strategies must be devised to promote effective diabetes management and the early diagnosis of diabetes across the Australian population.
2

Patterns of care for diabetes: risk factors for vision-threatening retinopathy

Orr, Neil John January 2005 (has links)
Master of Public Health / OBJECTIVES: In Australia, diabetes causes significant morbidity and mortality. Whilst the need to prevent diabetes and its complications has been widely recognised, the capacity of health care systems - which organise diabetes care - to facilitate prevention has not been fully established. METHODS: A series of seven population-based case-control studies were used to examine the effectiveness of the Australian health care system and its capacity to manage diabetes. Six of the studies compared the patterns of care of patients who had developed advanced diabetes complications in 2000 (cases), to similar patients who remained free of the condition (controls) across Australia and for various risk groups. A secondary study investigated the role of treating GPs in the development of the outcome. RESULTS: A strong relationship between the patterns of care and the development of advanced diabetes complications was found and is described in Chapter 4. In Chapter 5, this same relationship was investigated for each Australian state and territory, and similar findings were made. The study in Chapter 6 investigated whether late diagnosis or the patterns of care was the stronger risk factor for advanced diabetes complications, finding that the greatest risk was associated with the latter. In Chapter 7 the influence of medical care during the pre-diagnosis period was explored, and a strong relationship between care obtained in this period and the development of advanced complications was found. In Chapter 8, which investigated the role of socio-economic status in the development of advanced complications, found that the risk of advanced diabetes complications was higher in low socio-economic groups. Chapter 9 investigated geographic isolation and the development of advanced diabetes complications and found that the risk of advanced complications was higher in geographically isolated populations. Finally, Chapter 10, which utilised a provider database, found that some GP characteristics were associated with the development of advanced diabetes complications in patients. CONCLUSION: A number of major risk factors for the development of advanced complications in Australia was found. These related to poorer diabetes management, later diagnosis, low socioeconomic status and geographic isolation. Strategies must be devised to promote effective diabetes management and the early diagnosis of diabetes across the Australian population.

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