• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 707
  • 78
  • 21
  • 17
  • 16
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • Tagged with
  • 1187
  • 360
  • 236
  • 219
  • 215
  • 183
  • 175
  • 148
  • 136
  • 119
  • 116
  • 113
  • 80
  • 80
  • 79
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

Modelling shallow earthquakes with teleseismic broadband data

Sargeant, Susanne January 2002 (has links)
No description available.
42

Seismic assessment of flexible rocking structures

Acikgoz, Mehmet Sinan January 2015 (has links)
No description available.
43

Optimal Control of a Building During an Earthquake

Maples, Kenneth 01 May 2006 (has links)
In this thesis I develop a mathematical model for an apartment building during an earthquake. The movement of the building is restricted to a plane and twisting motions have been assumed negligible. A control system for the building is developed using optimal control techniques. For a quadratic objective functional, the existence of an optimal control is determined and numerical results are generated that show that the controller significantly lowers the chaotic oscillations in the building. The numerical work was done with the Miser3 package for Matlab. Relaxation of different constraints are considered, including multiple controls, varying stories, and different objective functionals.
44

Making Disaster Zones into “Scenic Sites,” Homelands into “Gardens,” and Peasants into “Grateful Survivors”: The Chinese State in Qiang Village Earthquake Recovery

January 2016 (has links)
acase@tulane.edu / 1 / Qiaoyun Zhang
45

Deformation-based seismic design models for waterfront structures

Yang, Dong-Shan. January 1999 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Oregon State University, 1999. / Includes bibliographical references.
46

Probabilistic seismic hazard assessment direct amplitude-based approach /

Tsang, Hing-ho. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Hong Kong, 2006. / Title proper from title frame. Also available in printed format.
47

Landslides triggered by the 1946 Ancash Earthquake (Peru) and geologic controls on the mechanisms of initial rock slope failure

Kampherm, Tanya Sandra January 2009 (has links)
The 1946 M7.3 Ancash earthquake triggered a large number of landslides in an epicentral area along the continental divide in the Andes of Peru. Reconnaissance reports by Silgado (1947, 1951), Heim (1949) and Rüegg (1950) published shortly after the earthquake describe some of the landslides, but lack any detailed documentation. A review of literature, field traverses, aerial photograph interpretation and GIS mapping, identified 45 landslides inferred to have been triggered by the event. The cumulative volume-frequency plot shows a strong power law relation, similar in form to that derived for landslides triggered by the 1994 Northridge earthquake (Harp and Jibson, 1995). Data for the Ancash earthquake plots near the regression line calculated by Keefer (1994), and modified by Malamud et al. (2004), for earthquake moment magnitude vs. total volume moved by landslides during the earthquake. A denudation (average surface lowering) of 76 mm and a denudation rate of 0.00585 mm/yr was estimated for the area over which the earthquake-triggered landslides occurred. Rock avalanches constituted 83% of the landslides which involved Cretaceous limestones interbedded with shales. Rock slope failures were common on slopes with a southwest aspect, an orientation corresponding to the regional dip direction of major planar structures in the epicentral area. In valleys oriented transverse to the NW-SE structural trend of the epicentral area, south-westerly dipping bedding planes combined with orthogonal joint sets to form numerous wedge failures. Three rock avalanches were analysed using conventional wedge failure criteria. Two of the rock avalanches which did not satisfy conventional criteria were utilized to develop a new criteria, i.e. stepped wedge criteria. Stepped wedge failure involves wedge movement along a stepped line of intersection formed by a nearly-vertical discontinuity, striking roughly parallel to the slope, and the conventional line of intersection formed by the bedding and orthogonal joint set. The nearly-vertical discontinuity forms the essential backscarp needed to facilitate stepped wedge failure. Additional characteristics of stepped wedge failure were also distinguished based on the wedge failures studied in the epicentral area of the 1946 Ancash earthquake.
48

Landslides triggered by the 1946 Ancash Earthquake (Peru) and geologic controls on the mechanisms of initial rock slope failure

Kampherm, Tanya Sandra January 2009 (has links)
The 1946 M7.3 Ancash earthquake triggered a large number of landslides in an epicentral area along the continental divide in the Andes of Peru. Reconnaissance reports by Silgado (1947, 1951), Heim (1949) and Rüegg (1950) published shortly after the earthquake describe some of the landslides, but lack any detailed documentation. A review of literature, field traverses, aerial photograph interpretation and GIS mapping, identified 45 landslides inferred to have been triggered by the event. The cumulative volume-frequency plot shows a strong power law relation, similar in form to that derived for landslides triggered by the 1994 Northridge earthquake (Harp and Jibson, 1995). Data for the Ancash earthquake plots near the regression line calculated by Keefer (1994), and modified by Malamud et al. (2004), for earthquake moment magnitude vs. total volume moved by landslides during the earthquake. A denudation (average surface lowering) of 76 mm and a denudation rate of 0.00585 mm/yr was estimated for the area over which the earthquake-triggered landslides occurred. Rock avalanches constituted 83% of the landslides which involved Cretaceous limestones interbedded with shales. Rock slope failures were common on slopes with a southwest aspect, an orientation corresponding to the regional dip direction of major planar structures in the epicentral area. In valleys oriented transverse to the NW-SE structural trend of the epicentral area, south-westerly dipping bedding planes combined with orthogonal joint sets to form numerous wedge failures. Three rock avalanches were analysed using conventional wedge failure criteria. Two of the rock avalanches which did not satisfy conventional criteria were utilized to develop a new criteria, i.e. stepped wedge criteria. Stepped wedge failure involves wedge movement along a stepped line of intersection formed by a nearly-vertical discontinuity, striking roughly parallel to the slope, and the conventional line of intersection formed by the bedding and orthogonal joint set. The nearly-vertical discontinuity forms the essential backscarp needed to facilitate stepped wedge failure. Additional characteristics of stepped wedge failure were also distinguished based on the wedge failures studied in the epicentral area of the 1946 Ancash earthquake.
49

Building Damage, Death and Downtime Risk Attenuation in Earthquakes

Huang, Yinghui 2012 May 1900 (has links)
Whether it is for pre-event prevention and preparedness or for post-event response and recovery of a catastrophic earthquake, estimates of damage, death and downtime (3d) losses are needed by engineers, owners, and policy makers. In this research, a quantitative "scenario-based" risk analysis approach as developed to investigate the 3d losses for buildings. The "Redbook Building" is taken as the typical New Zealand construction exemplar and analyzed for the 22 February 2011 Christchurch Earthquake. Losses are presented in the form of attenuation curves that also include the associated uncertainties. The spatial distribution of 3d damages over the height of buildings is also considered. It is thus shown that it is possible to discriminate between losses that lead to building replacement versus less severe losses that require structures to be repaired. The 3d loss results show that within the Christchurch city (17 km radial distance from the earthquake epicenter): (a) the expected physical damage loss ratio is about 50% of the property value; (b) the expected probability that someone is killed or seriously injured is about 4%; and (c) the expected downtime for the building being out of service is about 24 weeks. However, when considering various uncertainties, one can have 90% confidence that these loss estimations will be as high as: (a) complete loss (100% physical damage), implying structure has a great chance of collapse; (b) 8% possibility of fatality, implying deaths and significant injuries are likely; and (c) 1-year downtime due to post-event reconstruction demand surge. These informative results demonstrate that even though structures, such as the "Redbook Building", may have been well designed and constructed to contemporary standards, significant damage can still be expected and the downtime loss is particularly large. In order to solve this problem, new building structures should ideally be built stronger, include recentering attributes, and use Damage Avoidance Design (DAD) armoring connection details.
50

Simplified analysis of earthquake site response with particular application to low and moderate seismicity regions /

Sheikh, Md. Neaz. January 2001 (has links)
Thesis (M. Phil.)--University of Hong Kong, 2002. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 206-217).

Page generated in 0.0248 seconds