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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

An assessment of Computer Literacy education: Perceptions of Boston computer teachers concerning the teaching of Computer Literacy in the Boston public schools

Devoe, Charles Lawrence 01 January 1991 (has links)
As perceived by Boston computer teachers, to what degree is the Computer Literacy program in the public schools of Boston serving its students and faculties? To answer this question, the goal of this research was to make an assessment of the perceptions of Boston computer teachers concerning the teaching of Computer Literacy in their schools. A review of the literature and the discussions held in connection with a pilot study showed that a reasonable set of questions could be developed to provide some definitive answers. These answers expressed not only what individual teachers do encounter on a day-to-day basis, but also what they believed should be occurring in their classrooms. A questionnaire was designed with three "Areas of Interest" to obtain data. The three "Areas of Interest" were called "Curriculum," "Facilities," and "Policies." After the pilot study-group arrived at consensus, a reliability test was conducted on the instrument. Then the questionnaire and accompanying material was mailed to every certified computer teacher listed by the City of Boston School Department. With extensive follow-up procedures, the return rate reached 78%. The computer facilities of the University of Massachusetts (Harbor Campus), using a statistics management program called "Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (Version X)," treated the received data. The questionnaire asked for two responses to each question: one for current practice ("Does"), and the other for desired conditions ("Should"). For each question, "SSPSx" generated Means, Mean Discrepancies, Standard Deviations, and also made ANOVA comparisons between subgroups which related to school levels taught and to years of experience in teaching Computer Literacy. The data from Boston Computer Literacy teachers ranked the three "Areas of Interest," with "Curriculum" most favorable and "Policies" least favorable. Middle school teachers with longer experience were most content with the current conditions. Those teachers with an average (four to six years) length of experience appeared to be the most disturbed, regardless of the school level at which they worked.
42

The Dynamical Measurement and Modeling of Metacognition and Engagement using Self-report and Multimodal data with Advanced Learning Technologies

Wiedbusch, Megan 01 January 2023 (has links) (PDF)
Interdisciplinary research has demonstrated that learning and problem solving with advanced learning technologies (ALTs) such as intelligent tutoring systems, simulations, hypermedia, serious games, and virtual reality can promote and foster the development of 21st century skills (e.g., collaboration, problem solving, self-regulated learning) by measuring and using the interactions between cognitive, affective, metacognitive, motivational, and social (CAMMS) processes. Interdisciplinary researchers focused on self-regulated learning (SRL) have developed several theoretical models which model students' CAMMS processes and their learning behaviors. However, when empirically testing these models, researchers face complicated methodological decisions around modeling, measuring, processing, and analyzing student data. Many of these questions come from examining the interactions of the various processes in relation to overall learning instead of the isolated examination of each process independent of one another. This is especially true when looking across CAMMS (e.g., metacognitive regulation and motivational engagement) and not just within a single CAMMS process (e.g., metacognitive monitoring and control). For instance, metacognition and engagement are often discussed informally in conjunction with one another, however, many models of SRL provide a cursory mention of this relationship at best, if at all. Therefore, comprehensive models of both metacognition and engagement are needed to define future work within this field. Critically, this modeling needs to be specific about the component operationalizations and interactions, the dynamics of the components, and the conditions by which metacognition and engagement may interact. This may be accomplished by utilizing a combination of online dynamic multimodal data captured during learning, reasoning, and problem solving (revealing the what, when, and for how long), and traditional offline self-reports (revealing the why) as we measure, model, and (in the future) simulate learners and their metacognitive and engagement processes.
43

Constructing learning communities in Yukon schools : a pedagogical approach for technology integration

Davidson, Jo Ann Christine 11 1900 (has links)
The importance of integrating technology across the curriculum has been prominent in educational literature for the past decade. Numerous obstacles have been identified and documented surrounding the successful integration of technology in public schools. Access to hardware, appropriate software, professional training for educators, technical and financial support to sustain meaningful uses of technology in schools are the primary areas to be addressed when designing a comprehensive information technology implementation strategy for educational environments. The obstacles are clear, but many educational leaders have failed to develop a model which successfully addresses the challenge of integrating the use of technology as a tool for teaching and learning and as a means of constructing new knowledge for and by students. This paper will explore how technology facilitates learning through inquiry and how inquiry supports a constructivist/constructionist approach to teaching and learning for students and professional staff. This will lead to an examination of how inquiry and constructivism advance the integration of technology in education and how it provides a venue for developing communities of inquiry in schools. A framework for two initiatives developed for Yukon schools will be presented which address many of the challenges common to the successful integration of technology in public schools today. Both initiatives, the Computer Resource Teacher Model (CRTM) and Technology Learning Communities (TLC), promote integrative and constructive uses of technology through an inquiry-based approach to teaching and learning with computers.
44

Exploring the Use of Self-explanation Prompts in a Collaborative Learning Environment

January 2018 (has links)
abstract: A recorded tutorial dialogue can produce positive learning gains, when observed and used to promote discussion between a pair of learners; however, this same effect does not typically occur when an leaner observes a tutorial dialogue by himself or herself. One potential approach to enhancing learning in the latter situation is by incorporating self-explanation prompts, a proven technique for encouraging students to engage in active learning and attend to the material in a meaningful way. This study examined whether learning from observing recorded tutorial dialogues could be made more effective by adding self-explanation prompts in computer-based learning environment. The research questions in this two-experiment study were (a) Do self-explanation prompts help support student learning while watching a recorded dialogue? and (b) Does collaboratively observing (in dyads) a tutorial dialogue with self-explanation prompts help support student learning while watching a recorded dialogue? In Experiment 1, 66 participants were randomly assigned as individuals to a physics lesson (a) with self-explanation prompts (Condition 1) or (b) without self-explanation prompts (Condition 2). In Experiment 2, 20 participants were randomly assigned in 10 pairs to the same physics lesson (a) with self-explanation prompts (Condition 1) or (b) without self-explanation prompts (Condition 2). Pretests and posttests were administered, as well as other surveys that measured motivation and system usability. Although supplemental analyses showed some significant differences among individual scale items or factors, neither primary results for Experiment 1 or Experiment 2 were significant for changes in posttest scores from pretest scores for learning, motivation, or system usability assessments. / Dissertation/Thesis / Doctoral Dissertation Educational Technology 2018
45

Constructing learning communities in Yukon schools : a pedagogical approach for technology integration

Davidson, Jo Ann Christine 11 1900 (has links)
The importance of integrating technology across the curriculum has been prominent in educational literature for the past decade. Numerous obstacles have been identified and documented surrounding the successful integration of technology in public schools. Access to hardware, appropriate software, professional training for educators, technical and financial support to sustain meaningful uses of technology in schools are the primary areas to be addressed when designing a comprehensive information technology implementation strategy for educational environments. The obstacles are clear, but many educational leaders have failed to develop a model which successfully addresses the challenge of integrating the use of technology as a tool for teaching and learning and as a means of constructing new knowledge for and by students. This paper will explore how technology facilitates learning through inquiry and how inquiry supports a constructivist/constructionist approach to teaching and learning for students and professional staff. This will lead to an examination of how inquiry and constructivism advance the integration of technology in education and how it provides a venue for developing communities of inquiry in schools. A framework for two initiatives developed for Yukon schools will be presented which address many of the challenges common to the successful integration of technology in public schools today. Both initiatives, the Computer Resource Teacher Model (CRTM) and Technology Learning Communities (TLC), promote integrative and constructive uses of technology through an inquiry-based approach to teaching and learning with computers. / Education, Faculty of / Curriculum and Pedagogy (EDCP), Department of / Graduate
46

Is Technology the Answer? Investigating Students' Achievement and Engagement in Mathematics

Schuetz, Rachael Law 14 April 2016 (has links)
<p> With millions invested in educational technology, what is its impact on student achievement and engagement? This question formed the basis for a review of the current literature on the impact of iPads and other instructional technology on student academic growth and motivation in public schools. The research supports technology&rsquo;s positive impact on student achievement and engagement, but more research is needed in order to better understand how iPad use impacts students in the early elementary mathematics classroom. </p><p> This dissertation study examines the effects of an iPad-based math intervention, as compared to a traditional paper-pencil approach, on second graders&rsquo; achievement and engagement in mathematics. The students were assigned to treatment and control groups in matched pairs based on sex and pre-test scores. Then students engaged in a four-week math intervention, using either the iPad or paper-pencil. At the end of each intervention, students completed quantitative posttests given by their classroom teachers. Students then switched treatment and control groups for a second four-week math intervention. Quantitative pre-post assessments include Bridges math unit tests, easyCBM math tests, and a Likert-scale engagement measure. After the two interventions were completed, qualitative focus group data were collected from the teachers involved in the study, giving a more complete view of student engagement.</p><p> With finite intervention time and resources, schools need to know how to best improve student achievement and engagement in mathematics. This study fills a documented research gap and will help inform school decisions regarding instructional technology in the early elementary math classroom. </p>
47

Attentional scattering| how media multitasking and distraction impacts our secondary students

Jones, R. Kyle 09 July 2016 (has links)
<p> Although there is a large investment made in technology in our public and private schools each year, there has been comparatively little effort made into understanding the impact of that technology on our students. This study examines the relationship between student boredom, media multitasking, and distraction in an effort to understand the impact of media multitasking on our students. To examine this, a mixed methods design was utilized, consisting of a memory recall experiment, student interviews, and a survey instrument. This study found that laptops are preferred over iPads for both focus and academic reasons, and it discovered classroom environments and teaching methodologies that caused distraction to occur as well as strategies employed by students to attempt to overcome distraction. Ultimately, this study did not find an impact on academic performance as assessed by a memory recall experiment. As a result, this study contributes significant knowledge into technology distraction at the high school level as well as modifications that can help improve student focus.</p>
48

The use of micro-blogging for teacher professional development support and personalized professional development

Smith, Saress Ellerbe 29 July 2016 (has links)
<p> The purpose of this qualitative study was to look at how teachers use micro-blogging, in this case Twitter (www.twitter.com), for their own personalized professional learning and how effective Twitter is as a professional development (PD) tool. In order to measure the effectiveness of the tool, the researcher first gleaned nine essential characteristics of effective PD from the literature. This list was validated by experts in the PD community. The significance of this study was to reveal how participants actually used Twitter for PD, what their perspectives on the tool were, and how effective their experiences were with Twitter as a PD tool. Results of this study can be used to improve current practice, and provide a low cost, accessible, and available mechanism to foster an on-going, learner-centered, approach to PD, thus allowing teachers to become more involved in their own professional growth. For the 4 participants in this study, Twitter use for PD and its effectiveness varied greatly. The effectiveness of the tool depended on the participant&rsquo;s fluency with the technology and attitude towards social media. For the most fluent participant, Twitter met most of the requirements for effectiveness; however, Twitter use did not automatically provide a mechanism for reflection or self-assessment; nor did Twitter use provide an evaluation of the experience, both requirements of effective PD. With added evaluation and self-assessment processes, and with a fluent practitioner, Twitter does have the potential to be a very effective PD tool with its low cost, accessibility, and availability.</p>
49

Mathematical teachers' perception| Mobile learning and constructing 21st century collaborative cloud-computing environments in elementary public schools in the State of Kuwait

Alqallaf, Nadeyah 09 June 2016 (has links)
<p> The purpose of this study was to examine Kuwaiti mathematical elementary teachers&rsquo; perceptions about their ability to integrate M-learning (mobile learning) into their current teaching practices and the major barriers hindering teachers&rsquo; ability to create an M-learning environment. Furthermore, this study sought to understand teachers&rsquo; perceptions about their ability to create a collaborative cloud-computing learning environment that corresponds with the 21st century skills and possibly explain their readiness for future reformation of education in Kuwait. </p><p> Using an Internet-based format to this study quantitative and qualitative data, the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) and barriers survey gleaned quantitative information about how mathematics teachers and a head of a mathematics department (n = 562) viewed use of technology as well as the barriers they faced in integrating it into the classroom. Also, qualitative data were collected using a survey of open-ended questions to provide context to survey answers and better understand the barriers and affordance experienced by the participants. Moreover, a 21st century open-ended questionnaire was employed to collect qualitative information from mathematics teachers and head of the departments (n = 21) in regard the their ability to construct a 21st century learning environment based on collaboration and constructivist perspective utilizing a cloud-computing technology. </p><p> Quantitative analysis was utilized to examine elementary mathematics teachers&rsquo; perceptions using the TPACK survey, and the validity and reliability of the TPACK subscales were computed by administering the confirmatory factor analysis. Factors that were elicited were specified as: all seven subscales encompassed in the TPACK survey significantly fit model of factor structures, and the TPACK survey was reliable and valid. In addition, descriptive analysis such as the TPACK subscale means and standard deviations were computed via the SPSS software. </p><p> Qualitative content analysis was used to understand teachers&rsquo; perceptions about their ability to integrate mobile technology, perceptions of the primary barriers and affordance that limited their ability, and their perceptions of their ability to integrate collaborative cloud computing and create a 21st century learning environment based on the constructivist perspective. When analyzed, the self-reported open-ended survey yielded the following specific themes: (a) teachers perceived themselves high in their ability to integrate mobile technology; (b) the primary barriers based on teachers&rsquo; perceptions were budget constraints, IT limitations, time constraints, and administrative support; and (c) teachers perceived themselves high in their ability to integrate collaborative cloud computing to construct a 21st century learning environment based on the constructivist perspective. This study finding could be implemented to create a new modern mathematics elementary curriculum that resolves the current curriculum issues. Future research is recommended in the direction of creating a new mathematical curriculum based on administrators&rsquo;, parents&rsquo;, and students&rsquo; perspectives.</p>
50

Developing an engagement and social interaction model for a robotic educational agent

Brown, LaVonda N. 07 January 2016 (has links)
Effective educational agents should accomplish four essential goals during a student's learning process: 1) monitor engagement, 2) re-engage when appropriate, 3) teach novel tasks, and 4) improve retention. In this dissertation, we focus on all of these objectives through use of a teaching device (computer, tablet, or virtual reality game) and a robotic educational agent. We begin by developing and validating an engagement model based on the interactions between the student and the teaching device. This model uses time, performance, and/or eye gaze to determine the student's level of engagement. We then create a framework for implementing verbal and nonverbal, or gestural, behaviors on a humanoid robot and evaluate its perception and effectiveness for social interaction. These verbal and nonverbal behaviors are applied throughout the learning scenario to re-engage the students when the engagement model deems it necessary. Finally, we describe and validate the entire educational system that uses the engagement model to activate the behavioral strategies embedded on the robot when learning a new task. We then follow-up this study to evaluate student retention when using this system. The outcome of this research is the development of an educational system that effectively monitors student engagement, applies behavioral strategies, teaches novel tasks, and improves student retention to achieve individualized learning.

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