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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Development of a reverse genetic system for human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) and the molecular basis of its growth phenotype and adaptation to mice /

Phuektes, Patchara. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Murdoch University, 2009. / Thesis submitted to the Faculty of Health Sciences. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 204-226)
2

Decay accelerating factor is a cellular receptor for echovirus 7

Clarkson, Neil Adrian January 1996 (has links)
No description available.
3

Recovery of Texas-1 Coxsackie virus from the blood of a wild rabbit

O'Connor, John R. January 1957 (has links)
Thesis--Catholic Univ. of America.
4

Coxsackie B virus pathogenesis in mice /

Hindersson, Maria. January 2006 (has links)
Lic.-avh. (sammanfattning) Stockholm : Karolinska institutet, 2006. / Härtill 3 uppsatser.
5

Risk factors of hand foot mouth diseases outbreaks in kindergartens inHong Kong

Lau, Ming-ho., 劉明昊. January 2009 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Community Medicine / Master / Master of Public Health
6

Risk factors of hand foot mouth diseases outbreaks in kindergartens in Hong Kong

Lau, Ming-ho. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (M.P.H.)--University of Hong Kong, 2009. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 64-67).
7

Seasonal Dynamics and Relative Persistence Potential of the Enteric Species of Enterovirus in Wastewater

Brinkman, Nichole E. 17 October 2014 (has links)
No description available.
8

Effects of poliovirus infection on mitochondrial function

Koundouris, Anna January 2001 (has links)
No description available.
9

Studies on enteric viruses in water and sewage

Sellwood, Jane January 2000 (has links)
No description available.
10

An investigation of the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor in striated muscle /

Shaw, Christian A. January 2006 (has links)
Since its identification in 1997 as the common receptor for Coxsackie and adenovirus (CAR) multiple lines of evidence argue in favor of CAR contributing to aspects of cell adhesion in addition to serving as a viral receptor. Nevertheless, a precise biological role for CAR remains to be identified suggesting the receptor may participate in a variety of cellular functions that reflect its tissue specific and developmentally regulated expression. This thesis elucidates aspects of CAR biology in mature striated muscle by providing studies that encompass (i) its physiological cellular/subcellular localization and expression in mature striated muscle (ii) its expression profile in human diseased skeletal muscle and (iii) the potential consequences of its sustained expression in mature striated muscle where its levels would otherwise be highly attenuated. / In non-diseased, mature striated muscle despite low and barely detectable levels of the CAR transcript (cardiac and skeletal muscle respectively), we identified CAR as a novel component of the neuromuscular junction and showed its expression to be isoform-specific in contrast to the intercalated discs, where both predominant CAR isoforms are detected. We then investigated the expression of CAR at the level of human skeletal muscle disease. From these studies we observed that in diseases characterized by active necrosis and regeneration, extrasynaptic CAR expression is detectable in regenerating fibers and co-expressed with other previously described markers of regeneration at a high degree of coincidence. Moreover, extrasynaptic CAR expression appears to be a highly reliable indicator of the regenerative process offering potential use at the diagnostic level. Following these investigations, our final studies involved assessing whether sustained CAR expression might affect the normal homeostasis in skeletal and cardiac muscle using a transgenic mouse model. We discovered that transgenic mice expressing sustained high levels of CAR (as seen in the CAR+/+ transgenics) develop a lethal necrotizing myopathy characterized by dual deficiencies in dystrophin and dysferlin, two proteins pivotal in maintaining plasmalemmal integrity, raising the possibility for a previously unrecognized cause of skeletal muscle dysfunction. / Collectively these findings argue that in non-diseased mature skeletal and cardiac muscle, CAR expression is restricted to the neuromuscular junction and cardiac intercalated discs but in diseases of skeletal muscle characterized by active necrosis and regeneration, extrasynaptic CAR expression is reexpressed at these sites of injury/repair. In addition they raise the possibility that sustained CAR expression in mature skeletal muscle may be associated with altered muscle homeostasis.

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