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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

The effects of spatial arrangement on group formation, productivity, and satisfaction

Smith, Craig W. 05 1900 (has links)
No description available.
12

Perceived spatial location as a function of different terrain experiences

Engelman, William R. 12 1900 (has links)
No description available.
13

The prediction of preference evaluations of zoo exhibits : a comparison of the informational and psychophysical theories of environmental preference

Finlay, Theodore William 12 1900 (has links)
No description available.
14

An investigation into place attachment in Newtown

Van Loggerenberg, Nicolene 28 March 2010 (has links)
Town centres are increasingly being marketed and managed in a strategic manner. This is an attempt to increase footfall, awareness and participation in order to create long-term economic value for all stakeholders. The research contained in this study investigates the phenomenon of place attachment, where individuals experience varying levels of attachment to specific places. This attachment is typified by emotional bonds between individuals or groups of individuals and specific places, where place is seen as unique. This uniqueness is manifested in two main dimensions, and those are attachment due to the physical characteristics of a place and attachment due to the emotions a person or group experiences by virtue of the place. Various drivers of place attachment have been identified. The prevalence of these drivers amongst the business community of Newtown was investigated in order to give marketing professionals a better understanding of how individuals become attached to places. These findings could provide marketing professionals with a better understanding of place attachment drivers in order to improve their efforts in marketing a variety of places. It is hoped that this study will also highlight areas for future research regarding the phenomenon of place attachment and the implications for marketing professionals. / Dissertation (MBA)--University of Pretoria, 2010. / Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS) / unrestricted
15

Environmental concern in South Africa

Willers, Vivien Adele 05 1900 (has links)
The present study has identified variables which significantly distinguish between environmentally concerned and unconcerned subpopulations of different ethnic groupings in South Africa, and assimilated these variables within a new model of environmental concern. This model developed from a framework relating to attitude formation, adaptation and expression and focuses on the prediction of environmental concern as an important precursor of environmentally responsible behaviour. The model proposes that the prediction of environmental concern involves a number of variables associated with structures at different levels of experience. Subjects for the study were selected by students registered for the third-year course in Environmental Psychology at the University of South Africa in 1991 and 1992. Each student's sample consisted of four boys and four girls of 14 to 16 years of age, and four men and four women over 20 years of age from the following ethnic groups: Whites, blacks, Asians and coloured. The sample for 1991 consisted of 4475 subjects with 1954 subjects in the 1992 sample. Subjects completed the Environmental Concern Scale (ECS) developed by Weigel and Weigel (1978) and named what they consider to be the three most serious threats to the environment in order of priority. Empirical data strongly support the model's conceptualisation of the emergence of environmental concern as a dynamic composition of individual experience, factors at the personal level and factors at the socio-level, and temporal and spatial structures. With regards to the personal level factors, results from the factor analyses confirmed the existence of a passively orientated mode of environmental concern that sees others as being responsible for solving environmental problems, and a mode of personal responsibility or active concern. Results from the CHAID analyses showed conclusively that ethnic grouping, as a socio-level variable, is the single-most significant and consistent predictor of environmental concern, be it passive or active concern. As anticipated, the CHAID analyses also demonstrated that correlates of environmental concern differed across the two modes of thinking: For all ethnic groupings, respondents with higher educational qualifications consistently showed higher levels of passive concern than respondents with lower qualifications across the 1991 and 1992 data sets. Depending on ethnic grouping, place of residence, exposure to environmental education programmes and home language also played a role as interacting predictors of passive environmental concern. On the other hand, however, age group, gender and leisure-time interacted with ethnic grouping as relevant variables in the prediction of active concern. Apart from confirming the multidirectional features of the model, the data also testify to the dynamic interaction between personal and socio-level variables over time. With regard to individual subjective experience, the findings on subjects' perceptions about serious threats to the environment show that, although general pollution and air pollution remained the two most popular choices across all ethnic groupings, other distinct group differences in perception emerged. More specifically, whites, Asians and coloured respondents considered global and local problems to be serious threats, while blacks were more aware of problems which affect their daily lives. The findings serve to underscore the necessity of establishing exactly what a specific target group regard as the "environment" before any attempt is made to determine their attitudes towards environmental problems. Contrary to expectations, however, there were no significant differences between concerned and unconcerned subgroups as regards perception of serious threats, and the data of the content analysis revealed that peoples' perceptions of the most serious threats to the environment did not coincide with newspaper coverage of environmental issues in the two periods prior to the data gathering in 1991 and 1992. It should also be pointed out that the model was not as effective in accounting for the data from black samples as it was for other ethnic groupings. One of the possible reasons offered is that the key to understanding groups differences in environmental attitudes lies in the territorial range of the environmental concern being examined and the way in which environmental belief systems emerge. Directions for future research on environmental attitudes are suggested. The delineation of unconcerned groups has pinpointed those groups at whom efforts to bring about changes in orientation could be directed through awareness programmes. Concerned groups, on the other hand, could be encouraged to learn new skills and become more actively involved in identifying and resolving environmental problems and issues at all levels. The suggested way to implement this would be through environmental education. / Psychology / D. Litt. et Phil. (Psychology)
16

An investigation into the aesthetic and psychological effects of the soiling and cleaning of building facades

Andrew, Christopher A. January 1994 (has links)
As buildings age biological and non biological soiling accumulates on their facades. Soiling changes the visual appearance of buildings. This thesis investigates the aesthetic and perceptual changes which take place as a result of the accumulation of soiling. A series of experiments and surveys were conducted to investigate the effects soiling had on aesthetic and perceptual judgements of buildings. A multiple sorting procedure using photographs of buildings, revealed that both an aesthetic evaluation and soiling levels were important ways in which the buildings were conceptualised. A second study comparing photographs of architecturally similar buildings before and after stonecleaning had taken place, revealed large shifts in the evaluation of buildings following cleaning as measured by semantic differentials. Changes in evaluation were found to be dependent on the nature and outcome of the cleaning process. Buildings were also consistently perceived to be younger following cleaning. Surveys amongst residents of cities which had undergone major stonecleaning programmes revealed an awareness of this activity in line with theories of urban perception. Attitudes towards stonecleaning programmes was found to be generally favourable. A survey conducted amongst architects showed the complex range of aesthetic and perceptual effects which soiling and cleaning has on buildings. The surveys conducted amongst both the general public and architects revealed that while cleaned buildings were generally seen to be aesthetically more pleasing than heavily soiled ones, there were some situations where soiling could enhance the aesthetic appearance of buildings. A further study involving ratings of buildings which varied in terms of soiling was therefore conducted which further clarified the role of soiling in aesthetic judgements. Drawing on research in experimental and environmental aesthetics, as well as data from the reported experiments and surveys a model is proposed which relates soiling level to facade complexity and aesthetic evaluation.
17

Social and personal psychological influences on individual engagement with global climate change

Ogunbode, Charles Adedayo January 2018 (has links)
The aim of this thesis was to examine the way individual responses to global climate change are determined by intrapersonal, social and experiential factors through three streams of research. The first stream employs cross-sectional and experimental methods to demonstrate that the influence of climate change information on behavioural intentions among two African populations is largely conveyed indirectly through perceived threat and concern. My findings support a view that a failure to account for the indirect effects of knowledge may have resulted in a systematic underestimation of its importance as a basis for environmental action. In the second stream, I sought to resolve previous inconsistencies in the evidence for a link between flooding experiences and climate change engagement. Using secondary data analysis, I found that political affiliation modulates the link between flooding experience and preparedness to engage in climate change mitigation behaviour in the UK, such that the indirect links between flooding experience and preparedness to reduce energy use, and willingness to pay higher prices for energy efficient products, was stronger among left-leaning voters. These results were followed up with four experimental studies in which flooding experience was operationalised with a mental simulation technique. The experiments were designed to examine how values and attribution may moderate the effects of flooding experiences on climate change attitudes, but they did not yield any conclusive findings. Finally, I examined the interplay between descriptive and injunctive social norms as influences of behavioural engagement with climate change using cross-sectional and experimental data. I found that social norms may influence behavioural engagement with climate change indirectly through their effects on individuals' perceptions of, and emotional responses to, the problem. However, the nature of this influence may also be dependent on the convergence of the two norm types and the level of individuals' intrinsic prioritization of pro-environmental outcomes.
18

Environmental concern in South Africa

Willers, Vivien Adele 05 1900 (has links)
The present study has identified variables which significantly distinguish between environmentally concerned and unconcerned subpopulations of different ethnic groupings in South Africa, and assimilated these variables within a new model of environmental concern. This model developed from a framework relating to attitude formation, adaptation and expression and focuses on the prediction of environmental concern as an important precursor of environmentally responsible behaviour. The model proposes that the prediction of environmental concern involves a number of variables associated with structures at different levels of experience. Subjects for the study were selected by students registered for the third-year course in Environmental Psychology at the University of South Africa in 1991 and 1992. Each student's sample consisted of four boys and four girls of 14 to 16 years of age, and four men and four women over 20 years of age from the following ethnic groups: Whites, blacks, Asians and coloured. The sample for 1991 consisted of 4475 subjects with 1954 subjects in the 1992 sample. Subjects completed the Environmental Concern Scale (ECS) developed by Weigel and Weigel (1978) and named what they consider to be the three most serious threats to the environment in order of priority. Empirical data strongly support the model's conceptualisation of the emergence of environmental concern as a dynamic composition of individual experience, factors at the personal level and factors at the socio-level, and temporal and spatial structures. With regards to the personal level factors, results from the factor analyses confirmed the existence of a passively orientated mode of environmental concern that sees others as being responsible for solving environmental problems, and a mode of personal responsibility or active concern. Results from the CHAID analyses showed conclusively that ethnic grouping, as a socio-level variable, is the single-most significant and consistent predictor of environmental concern, be it passive or active concern. As anticipated, the CHAID analyses also demonstrated that correlates of environmental concern differed across the two modes of thinking: For all ethnic groupings, respondents with higher educational qualifications consistently showed higher levels of passive concern than respondents with lower qualifications across the 1991 and 1992 data sets. Depending on ethnic grouping, place of residence, exposure to environmental education programmes and home language also played a role as interacting predictors of passive environmental concern. On the other hand, however, age group, gender and leisure-time interacted with ethnic grouping as relevant variables in the prediction of active concern. Apart from confirming the multidirectional features of the model, the data also testify to the dynamic interaction between personal and socio-level variables over time. With regard to individual subjective experience, the findings on subjects' perceptions about serious threats to the environment show that, although general pollution and air pollution remained the two most popular choices across all ethnic groupings, other distinct group differences in perception emerged. More specifically, whites, Asians and coloured respondents considered global and local problems to be serious threats, while blacks were more aware of problems which affect their daily lives. The findings serve to underscore the necessity of establishing exactly what a specific target group regard as the "environment" before any attempt is made to determine their attitudes towards environmental problems. Contrary to expectations, however, there were no significant differences between concerned and unconcerned subgroups as regards perception of serious threats, and the data of the content analysis revealed that peoples' perceptions of the most serious threats to the environment did not coincide with newspaper coverage of environmental issues in the two periods prior to the data gathering in 1991 and 1992. It should also be pointed out that the model was not as effective in accounting for the data from black samples as it was for other ethnic groupings. One of the possible reasons offered is that the key to understanding groups differences in environmental attitudes lies in the territorial range of the environmental concern being examined and the way in which environmental belief systems emerge. Directions for future research on environmental attitudes are suggested. The delineation of unconcerned groups has pinpointed those groups at whom efforts to bring about changes in orientation could be directed through awareness programmes. Concerned groups, on the other hand, could be encouraged to learn new skills and become more actively involved in identifying and resolving environmental problems and issues at all levels. The suggested way to implement this would be through environmental education. / Psychology / D. Litt. et Phil. (Psychology)
19

The study of responses to architectural exteriors by architectural and non-architectural students /

Kunawong, Chalay January 1986 (has links)
No description available.
20

Restorative benefits of the natural environment : enhancing restoration of directed attention & stress reduction through raising levels of cognitive awareness & physical encounter

Lalak, Nadia January 2009 (has links)
Philosophy(PhD) / Interaction with the natural environment has a vital role in human well-being - physical, social, spiritual and psychological - and yet in the twenty-first century many people lead a way of life totally separated from natural environments. Built environments and the increasing complexity of technological tasks necessitate increased demands for attention and a constant processing of information. Adaptation to such demands can result in depletion of psychological resources leading to stress and mental fatigue. Psychological resources must then be “restored” as they are critical for effective functioning. A review of restorative environments literature suggests there is further scope for enhancing restorative opportunities. A hypothetical model of enhanced restoration is proposed. It posits that an individual assuming a more active role, through raised cognitive awareness and physical encounter in the person-natural environment interaction will experience enhanced restoration in terms of restoration of directed attention and reduction of stress. The research hypotheses are tested using a quantitative field-based pretest-posttest experimental design with a sample of 100 volunteers. Data is collected through computerised objective and subjective measurement scales of attention and affect. Data is analysed through ANOVA. The major finding is that posttest scores improved compared to pretest scores in all 3 attention tests, 2 subjective attention scores and both affect measures, averaged over all 4 intervention groups. This means that the participants’ directed attention improved and they considered themselves to be less stressed regardless of the allocated experimental intervention group. Therefore, the most effective intervention in improving directed attention fatigue and reducing stress was raising an individual’s level of physical encounter with the natural environment. Further research is warranted, into the contribution that an individual can make to enhance the restorative process, and the need for education to raise awareness of the importance of the natural environment as a valuable (health-care) resource.

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