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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Medication errors study of their causes : submitted ... in partial fulfillment ... Master of Hospital Administration /

Trautman, Robert Paul. January 1960 (has links)
Thesis (M.H.A.)--University of Michigan, 1960.
2

Medication errors study of their causes : submitted ... in partial fulfillment ... Master of Hospital Administration /

Trautman, Robert Paul. January 1960 (has links)
Thesis (M.H.A.)--University of Michigan, 1960.
3

On errors & adverse outcomes in surgery learning from experience /

Troëng, Thomas. January 1992 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Lund University, 1992. / Added t.p. with thesis statement inserted.
4

Human error and disturbance occurrence in manufacturing systems

Barroso, Monica Frias da Costa Paz January 2000 (has links)
No description available.
5

The nature of error, error detection and automaticity in skilled behaviour

Baker, Troy Andrew, Psychology, Faculty of Science, UNSW January 2005 (has links)
This series of research attempted to clarify a number of issues relating to highly skilled performance including the frequency and nature of errors, the error detection capabilities and the purported role of automaticity in the production of skilled behaviour. The first study applied Rasmussen???s (1980) skill-, rule- and knowledge-based behaviour taxonomy to examine the frequency and nature of errors in skilled and highly skilled behaviour. Results provided an estimate of the frequency of skill-based errors, which has been unavailable in previous diary studies. A significantly lower proportion of skill-based errors were reported by elite compared with recreational golfers, suggesting that a characteristic of highly skilled behaviour is a reduction in the tendency toward minimal levels of cognitive control exhibited in everyday tasks and by those of lesser skill. In order to establish the level of insight skilled performers have into their actions, the second study manipulated visual feedback to examine the detection of error in elite and recreational golfers. Results indicated that an increase in skill was associated with an increase in the ability to detect error, however the error detection capability of elite players was far from perfect with fewer than 60% of marginal errors detected. Visual confirmation of the outcome is apparently necessary for precise error detection even in highly skilled golfers. In addition, both elite and recreational golfers attributed errors to poor concentration, yet this result appeared to be dependent upon observation of the error. Elite and recreational golfers reported attending to cues relating to the target, rhythm and technique during execution of the golf swing. The final series of experiments examined the effect of a sudden irrelevant sound on the performance of elite and recreational golfers. The first phase of this series of experiments demonstrated that an irrelevant sound occurring during the golf swing could disrupt the performance of elite and recreational players. The second experiment suggested that, in elite golfers, the disruption of performance was most likely an orienting response to the sudden noise. The results of these studies suggest that although attentional resources become available with the progression to skilled behaviour, even a highly proceduralised movement sequence, such as the golf swing, never becomes completely resource free. The final experiment suggested that increasing the attentional engagement of elite golfers could attenuate the negative impact of a sudden irrelevant sound on performance. Whilst there is no question of a tendency towards automaticity with extended practice, overall the research questions the proposition that highly skilled behaviour is characterised by a literal interpretation of automaticity, either in the planning or execution of movement, or in relation to error detection.
6

The lexicon in a model of language production /

Stemberger, Joseph Paul, January 1982 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of California, San Diego, 1982. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 291-299).
7

The lexicon in a model of language production /

Stemberger, Joseph Paul, January 1982 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of California, San Diego, 1982 / Vita. Bibliography: leaves 291-299.
8

Medication safety in hospitals : medication errors and interventions to improve the medication use process

Samaranayake, Nithushi Rajitha January 2013 (has links)
Medication errors are an unnecessary threat to patient safety. The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiology of medication errors and to assess the effectiveness of interventions intended to avoid medication errors in a tertiary-care hospital in Hong Kong. The epidemiology of medication errors included the study of the pattern of interception of medication errors and the study of technology-related medication errors using medication incidents reported during years 2006–2010. 34.1% of all medication errors that were reported in the study hospital were not intercepted and 92.4% of all drug administration errors reached the patient. 17.1% of all reported medication errors were technology-related and, most were due to human interaction with technology. The effects of a bar-code assisted medication administration (BCMA) system when used without the support of computerised prescribing (stand-alone), on its users and the dispensing process was studied using direct observations, questionnaires (Likert scale) and interviews. It was found that this system increased the number of dispensing steps from 5 to 8 and dispensing time by 1.9 times. Potential dispensing errors also increased (P<0.001). The perceived usefulness of the technology decreased among pharmacy staff (P=0.008) after implementation and they (N=16) felt that the system offered less benefit to the dispensing process (8/16) without the support of computerised prescribing. Nurses (N=10) felt that the stand-alone BCMA system was useful in improving the accuracy of drug administration (8/10). Avoiding the use of inappropriate abbreviations in prescriptions will help to reduce medication errors. Therefore the effectiveness of a ‘Do Not Use’ list (a list of error-prone abbreviations used in the study hospital) and attitudes of health care professionals on using abbreviations in prescriptions was studied using prescription review and questionnaires respectively. The use of abbreviations included in the ‘Do Not Use’ list decreased significantly (P<0.001) after its introduction but other unapproved abbreviations to denote drug names and instructions were commonly used. 96% of doctors, and all pharmacists and nurses, believed that avoiding inappropriate abbreviations will help to reduce medication errors. The use of abbreviations in prescriptions and attitudes of pharmacists in the study hospital was compared with a different medical system to determine the appropriateness of developing a universal error-prone abbreviation list. It was found that the types and frequencies of using inappropriate abbreviations vary among different medical systems. In conclusion, additional interventions such as technological interventions are needed to minimise drug administration errors, but proper planning and careful monitoring are needed to avoid unintended errors when using technologies. Implementing a stand-alone BCMA system aimed at reducing drug administration errors may affect the dispensing process. Therefore effects of a technology on all related processes need to be considered before implementation, and monitored after implementation. The introduction of a ‘Do Not Use’ list is effective in reducing inappropriate abbreviations in prescriptions and most health care professionals agree that avoiding inappropriate abbreviations may help to reduce medication errors. However, formulating in-house error-prone and standard abbreviation lists in hospitals, continuous updating of the lists and frequent reminders to prescribers are recommended. / published_or_final_version / Medicine / Doctoral / Doctor of Philosophy
9

The nature of error, error detection and automaticity in skilled behaviour

Baker, Troy Andrew, Psychology, Faculty of Science, UNSW January 2005 (has links)
This series of research attempted to clarify a number of issues relating to highly skilled performance including the frequency and nature of errors, the error detection capabilities and the purported role of automaticity in the production of skilled behaviour. The first study applied Rasmussen???s (1980) skill-, rule- and knowledge-based behaviour taxonomy to examine the frequency and nature of errors in skilled and highly skilled behaviour. Results provided an estimate of the frequency of skill-based errors, which has been unavailable in previous diary studies. A significantly lower proportion of skill-based errors were reported by elite compared with recreational golfers, suggesting that a characteristic of highly skilled behaviour is a reduction in the tendency toward minimal levels of cognitive control exhibited in everyday tasks and by those of lesser skill. In order to establish the level of insight skilled performers have into their actions, the second study manipulated visual feedback to examine the detection of error in elite and recreational golfers. Results indicated that an increase in skill was associated with an increase in the ability to detect error, however the error detection capability of elite players was far from perfect with fewer than 60% of marginal errors detected. Visual confirmation of the outcome is apparently necessary for precise error detection even in highly skilled golfers. In addition, both elite and recreational golfers attributed errors to poor concentration, yet this result appeared to be dependent upon observation of the error. Elite and recreational golfers reported attending to cues relating to the target, rhythm and technique during execution of the golf swing. The final series of experiments examined the effect of a sudden irrelevant sound on the performance of elite and recreational golfers. The first phase of this series of experiments demonstrated that an irrelevant sound occurring during the golf swing could disrupt the performance of elite and recreational players. The second experiment suggested that, in elite golfers, the disruption of performance was most likely an orienting response to the sudden noise. The results of these studies suggest that although attentional resources become available with the progression to skilled behaviour, even a highly proceduralised movement sequence, such as the golf swing, never becomes completely resource free. The final experiment suggested that increasing the attentional engagement of elite golfers could attenuate the negative impact of a sudden irrelevant sound on performance. Whilst there is no question of a tendency towards automaticity with extended practice, overall the research questions the proposition that highly skilled behaviour is characterised by a literal interpretation of automaticity, either in the planning or execution of movement, or in relation to error detection.
10

Field measures of refractive error /

Smith, Kyla M. January 2008 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S.)--New England College of Optometry, 2008. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 51-57).

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