• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 3
  • Tagged with
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Judgment of feeling states from facial behavior: a bottom-up approach

Snodgrass, Jacalyn D. 05 1900 (has links)
A series of studies was conducted to examine the feasiblity of a bottom-up approach to the study of judgment of affective feeling states from facial behavior. Previous work on the judgment of emotion from facial expressions has taken a more top-down approach; observers judged the emotional meaning of a wholistic facial expression. Individual facial movements have sometimes then been identified within that complex expression, but the meaning of those individual movements has not been studied. A bottom-up approach begins by exploring the meaning of individual facial movements instead of complex facial expressions. In this approach the relationship between the emotional meaning of individual facial movements and complex facial expressions can be explored. It is argued that such an approach has the potential to explain judgment of not only a limited set of basic emotional expressions, but the full range of emotionally tinged feelings that individuals both experience in themselves and judge in others. Individual action units, as scored by Ekman and Friesen's (1978) Facial Action Coding System (FACS), and selected combinations of action units were presented to observers in three pairs of studies. Filmstrip sequences were used in the first pair of studies, and still photographs in the other two pairs. In the first study of each pair, observers judged the degree of pleasure and arousal expressed by the face. In the second study of each pair, observers rated how well each of a set of emotion terms described the feeling expressed by the face. Observers were found to reliably attribute meaning to individual action units on both scales. Additionally, pleasure and arousal judgments predicted emotion term ratings. The meaning attributed to combinations of action units was found to be related to the meanings of the individual action units occurring alone. Resultant ratings were shown to be meaningful within a dimensional model of emotion space.
2

Judgment of feeling states from facial behavior: a bottom-up approach

Snodgrass, Jacalyn D. 05 1900 (has links)
A series of studies was conducted to examine the feasiblity of a bottom-up approach to the study of judgment of affective feeling states from facial behavior. Previous work on the judgment of emotion from facial expressions has taken a more top-down approach; observers judged the emotional meaning of a wholistic facial expression. Individual facial movements have sometimes then been identified within that complex expression, but the meaning of those individual movements has not been studied. A bottom-up approach begins by exploring the meaning of individual facial movements instead of complex facial expressions. In this approach the relationship between the emotional meaning of individual facial movements and complex facial expressions can be explored. It is argued that such an approach has the potential to explain judgment of not only a limited set of basic emotional expressions, but the full range of emotionally tinged feelings that individuals both experience in themselves and judge in others. Individual action units, as scored by Ekman and Friesen's (1978) Facial Action Coding System (FACS), and selected combinations of action units were presented to observers in three pairs of studies. Filmstrip sequences were used in the first pair of studies, and still photographs in the other two pairs. In the first study of each pair, observers judged the degree of pleasure and arousal expressed by the face. In the second study of each pair, observers rated how well each of a set of emotion terms described the feeling expressed by the face. Observers were found to reliably attribute meaning to individual action units on both scales. Additionally, pleasure and arousal judgments predicted emotion term ratings. The meaning attributed to combinations of action units was found to be related to the meanings of the individual action units occurring alone. Resultant ratings were shown to be meaningful within a dimensional model of emotion space. / Arts, Faculty of / Psychology, Department of / Graduate
3

Cerebral asymmetry in facial affect perception of women: neuropsychological effects of depression

Crews, William David 05 September 2009 (has links)
Forty right-handed women, half who had been classified as depressed, the other half nondepressed, participated in a tachistoscopic study of the influence of depression on the cerebral hemispheric processing of Ekman and Friesen’s (1976) happy, sad, and neutral emotional faces. A dynamometer was also used as a standardized measure of hemispheric motor functioning such as hand grip strength, perseveration, and fatigue. Results indicated that the depressed women were characterized by elevated levels of both depression and anxiety, suggestive of an agitated, depressive state with heightened arousal. Further, depressed as compared to nondepressed women displayed significantly faster reaction times to sad faces presented their right visual fields and happy faces presented their left visual fields. For the dynamometer data, primary findings indicated that depressed women displayed significantly less perseveration at the left hand as compared to nondepressed women. There was also a trend for depressed as opposed to nondepressed women to show less perseveration at the right hand. These findings from both the tachistoscope and dynamometer data are suggestive of differential arousal of both the left and right cerebral hemispheres and are discussed in light of arousal theory. / Master of Science

Page generated in 0.1447 seconds