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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The design of an intervention to reduce violence in the family: A family–centred approach

Ryan, Jill January 2018 (has links)
Philosophiae Doctor - PhD / Violence occurs in different environments, however, it is often found in the family with family members being the perpetrators. Family violence, as an integrative concept, is defined by few researchers or theorists, let alone conceptualised as a theoretical grounding for family-centred interventions aimed at violence in the home. However, family members are all affected in the act of any violence in the family, thus any intervention should include the whole family. A family-centred approach focuses on all family members to be included in the intervention and is acknowledged as the best method when trying to create an intervention for family violence. Thus, the aim of this study was to design an intervention programme for families experiencing family violence in order to reduce violence in the family. To create such a programme, intervention mapping was the chosen design for this study. Intervention mapping has five steps, 1.) Specify the programme’s goals into proximal programme objectives. In this stage, needs are identified; 2.) Selection of theoretical and practical strategies; 3.) Design the programme, 4.) Implementation of the programme, and 5.) Focus on anticipating process and effect evaluation. However, this study only focused on the first 3 steps of intervention development, namely, Phase I, a family violence needs assessment done to identify the problem, Phase II entailed a review done to determine appropriate theoretical and practical approaches for the intervention regarding family violence, and lastly, Phase III had been a Delphi study which aided in the design and development of the intervention. This study showed promising results with proven long-term positive effects in implementing a family-centred approach, and when coupled with a collaborative network of support services, political will, and community support, and has the ability to ensure continuity of care and improved functioning for families experiencing violence in the home.
2

A curriculum for training of occupational therapists in early childhood intervention

Aronstam, Maria Cornelia 01 August 2007 (has links)
Please read the abstract (Summary) in the section 00front of this document / Dissertation (M Occ Ther)--University of Pretoria, 2007. / Occupational Therapy / unrestricted
3

Collaborations between music therapist and parents to transfer music therapy activities into the home context for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Tracey, Kerryn A. January 2017 (has links)
This qualitative research study explored areas of similarity and contrast between a music therapy student's interpretations of selected audiovisual excerpts from music therapy sessions with a child with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and his parent's interpretations of the same. A further feature of the study was investigating how these interpretations could inform the collaborative creation of a music activity for use in the home environment. Eight one-on-one music therapy sessions were conducted with an eight year-old boy with ASD at Alpha School in the Western Cape. The sessions were video recorded. Once the music therapy process was complete, four primary excerpts and five secondary excerpts were selected. Interpretations of the four primary excerpts were written by the music therapy student. A semi-structured interview consisting of two parts was then conducted with the child's parent. Part one involved eliciting the parent's interpretations of the four primary excerpts. Part two involved the viewing of the five secondary excerpts as part of a discussion between the music therapy student and parent, leading to the collaborative creation of a music activity for the home environment. The interpretations of the music therapy student and parent were matched with the music therapy student's interpretations for the purposes of qualitative content analysis and comparative analysis. Codes were derived for the interpretations, and then grouped into sub-categories and categories. Two overarching themes were then drawn from the data: operation of the music therapy student's contextual lens; and operation of the parent's lens. Within these two themes, different sub-themes were present: music therapy student’s reflexivity; focus on developing relationship; focus on clinical musical features; valuing offerings as musical; parent's pride in her child; noticing musical interactions; and focusing on successful interactions. These themes then implicitly informed the collaborative creation of a music activity for the home context. / Dissertation (MMus)--University of Pretoria, 2017. / Music / MMus / Unrestricted

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